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Mineral and Corn

Monk74

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Nov 26, 2019
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92
That being said , I don’t fault anyone who does the opposite of me. Everybody is different. And if you pay a bank note and property taxes or lease a place, do whatever makes you happy.
 

BSK

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Joined
Mar 11, 1999
Messages
68,600
Location
Nashville, TN
This fall, I plan on (as much as I can) trying to spray the stumps of the least-desired trees we want there soon after they are cut. You might also consider this for less competition on the trees, seedlings or nuts you plant - also more sunlight hitting the ground in the upcoming years. Just throwing another option out there for combating trees you don't want.
Great idea. Unfortunately, the less desirably species tend to be the most aggressive recolonizers.
 

BSK

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Joined
Mar 11, 1999
Messages
68,600
Location
Nashville, TN
Monk74,

I would simply caution you on making associations between something that has been done and what you see from a couple deer. Local deer populations are shockingly complex organisms, with many, many factors influencing their performance. Unfortunately, I watch all the time as hunters/landowners jump to conclusions based on what they hope is true, and usually involving simple solutions to complex problems. A case in point: I have a client that has been heavily supplementally feeding for years. There has been no uptick in herd performance during that time. Until last year. Last year, the hunters experienced a HUGE increase in antler growth per age-class last year. They are now completely convinced the supplemental feeding is finally working - primarily because they were so convinced early on it was going to be the answer to their local low-performance problems. However, they're ignoring the fact that EVERY property in the area experienced a huge increase in antler growth per age-class last year and that they've been supplementing for years without improvement.
 

Shed Hunter

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Joined
Oct 11, 2011
Messages
3,880
Location
Henderson County
Monk74,

I would simply caution you on making associations between something that has been done and what you see from a couple deer. Local deer populations are shockingly complex organisms, with many, many factors influencing their performance. Unfortunately, I watch all the time as hunters/landowners jump to conclusions based on what they hope is true, and usually involving simple solutions to complex problems. A case in point: I have a client that has been heavily supplementally feeding for years. There has been no uptick in herd performance during that time. Until last year. Last year, the hunters experienced a HUGE increase in antler growth per age-class last year. They are now completely convinced the supplemental feeding is finally working - primarily because they were so convinced early on it was going to be the answer to their local low-performance problems. However, they're ignoring the fact that EVERY property in the area experienced a huge increase in antler growth per age-class last year and that they've been supplementing for years without improvement.
I remember you mentioning last year being an abnormally good year for growth. What’s your prediction on this year?
 

BSK

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Joined
Mar 11, 1999
Messages
68,600
Location
Nashville, TN
I remember you mentioning last year being an abnormally good year for growth. What’s your prediction on this year?
If I could predict those years, I would probably be a wealthy man! I will have to see the first mid to late summer trail cam pictures coming in to know.

I do think the western 2/3 of TN will see a pretty big white oak acorn crop, but a poor red oak acorn crop. That can make hunting a bit more difficult in October through mid-November with a bunch of white oak acorns on the ground. But by late November, without red oak acorns, deer should really shift towards food plots, which makes hunting a lot easier.
 

BSK

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Joined
Mar 11, 1999
Messages
68,600
Location
Nashville, TN
But the idea is interesting. Looking back at past years, I can see some really good years for antler development and some really bad years. I wish I knew the EXACT factors that drive those ups and downs.
 

woodsman04

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2018
Messages
583
Y’all ought to work at a feed mill and have to turn a farmers load of grain down because the moisture isn’t right.
That corn isn’t used to make chicken or cow feed. The reason why? Is because it’s bad for them if aflatoxins are developed. It’s a huge deal.
As mentioned before, this corn isn’t thrown away, it’s sold as a different feed such as the wildlife feed.

If it ain’t good enough for cows or chickens, what makes you think it’s ok for deer or turkeys? That’s my view on it anyways.
 

JCDEERMAN

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Joined
Jul 19, 2008
Messages
12,307
Location
NASHVILLE, TN
I do think the western 2/3 of TN will see a pretty big white oak acorn crop, but a poor red oak acorn crop. That can make hunting a bit more difficult in October through mid-November with a bunch of white oak acorns on the ground. But by late November, without red oak acorns, deer should really shift towards food plots, which makes hunting a lot easier.
And for us food plotters out there, planting the appropriate fall crops to capitalize on this can pay off. If the white oak acorns are raining down, that's where they'll likely be eating. Hence, don't plant too many early crops, I'd rather focus on mid-late blends this year.
 

BSK

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Joined
Mar 11, 1999
Messages
68,600
Location
Nashville, TN
Good plan JCDEERMAN. Let me add that, as long as nothing bad for acorn production occurs between now and mid-September, we should have a big white oak acorn crop! Branches blown out of trees by local storms are displaying MANY acorn buds, even triple and quadruple acorn bud clusters. As long as growing conditions continue as they have, we should have a big crop.
 

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