Inline Crossbows

bowriter

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I know several people who use them, considered it myself except my problem is in drawing it to start with-no right shoulder at all. At one time could have drawn a bow one time. Now, can't even begin to draw one. If I could, I would probably get one. I can shoot a compound more accurately than a crossbow and they are tens times lighter. Been around for ages.
 

102

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Last season, the DAY before our Illinois permits showed up in the mail, my 75 year old hunting buddy told me he could no longer draw his 55 pound compound.
He was SICK. THe doctor told him he had a torn rotator cuff. It was painful to raise his arm.

I got busy and researched Draw-loc, by Hickory Creek.

My buddy told me he did not want to buy a cross bow and did not feel comfortable borrowing someone elses.

We oredered a draw loc.

It cost 200.00 and arrived within a few days.

It literally took 15 minutes to put it on his bow and sight it in.

Also, since the drawing of the bow now used different muscles and BOTH arms and back, he maxed his limbs out to about 65 pounds and in no time was shooting better than ever and faster/flatter than ever.

Then, last November, he killed his FIRST Pope and Young buck.

It is truly a very fine product that I fully recommend.

BTW, he was not able to hold the bow up very long so he bought a Primos trigger stick and uses it on his stabilizer for quick support...even in a tree stand.
 

bowriter

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Just a techi note here: Since he used a draw device that held thebow at full draw, it was not a P&Y buck. It was one the met or exceeded P&Y minimums. P&Y won't accept animals killed with such a device...or even Luminocs, so I am told.
 

Hunter 257W

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Is the interface where it fastens to the bow standardized enough to work well with any brand bow?

I would have to really investigate the trustworthiness of the safety mechanism too. Having dry fired a compound bow once, I sure wouldn't want that thing to let the string go when I wasn't ready.
 

102

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We know John, but trust me, he, nor I, nor anyone else in our group, (and I am sure this includes you), DON'T CARE if P/Y standards are met.
I was just saying it is a good device. It works well, it is a great tool for a man that may have an injury, or a need for a little assistance.
 

102

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Hunter 257W said:
Is the interface where it fastens to the bow standardized enough to work well with any brand bow?

I would have to really investigate the trustworthiness of the safety mechanism too. Having dry fired a compound bow once, I sure wouldn't want that thing to let the string go when I wasn't ready.

GREAT question...the answer is that the safety device works very well. In fact, there are TWO safety, anti-dry-fire devices built it making it virtually impossible to dry fire.
I do not know if it will work on ALL bows, but this is a good company who stands behind their work. THey will tell you if you call them.
 

Winchester

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A great idea for those who need it thats been around for quite a while. I personally dread the day I have to use one, but I can assure you I will use one of these before a Xbow if im able!
 

102

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Winchester said:
A great idea for those who need it thats been around for quite a while. I personally dread the day I have to use one, but I can assure you I will use one of these before a Xbow if im able!

Same here Winchester. It has been good for the camp to watch the oldest have good success with this contraption.

It adds some weight to the bow for sure, but it may be taken off for trips to and fro. In fact, anytime you want you can take it off and shoot it like a regular compound with the turn of a knob.

It is so easy to use and pull back, even in a climbing stand. He now pulls back more poundage than he ever has before.

THis winter, after the season, he got surgery and is now re-habbing his shoulder. He will probably not need it anymore.
 

bowriter

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Without a doubt, it is better in terms of mobility than a crossbow. Did I see/hear correctly, thebow is pulled back with both arms just as you would a crossbow? If so, I will have me one on order post haste.
 

102

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John,
Yes, you heard correctly, both arms. And also the way you draw your bow is much easier because of the position you draw it in. THis is why the extra poundage is so much easier.

I do not use one but have shot his many times.
IMO, the advantages are that your bow is vertical, QUIET, and very accurate.
 

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