• Help Support TNDeer:

Strange Fawn Sighting

bgant

Active Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2019
Messages
33
Every year I start seeing fawns in my yard around early to mid-May. I was starting to wonder what was going on, as I haven't seen any this year, and there are tons of doe all around me. I went down to check my garden this morning, which is surrounded entirely by 4-foot tall cattle panels, and got half way through my garden before seeing this little one. Its spots haven't started fading and it looked very thin and frail, making me think it's pretty young. Any idea how it got over the fence? Mature deer could jump 4 feet without a problem, but surely not a fawn this small. Could it have squeezed through a 6x6 inch opening in the cattle panel?

Can't wait to hear some input on this one. Gonna have to keep a close eye on the garden today in hopes of seeing how it gets out.
 

Attachments

    You don't have permission to view attachments. Attachments are hidden.

punkcat

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2010
Messages
160
Location
The Rock
Been there an hour. Right next to the house.
 

Attachments

    You don't have permission to view attachments. Attachments are hidden.

bgant

Active Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2019
Messages
33
Yes it could squeeze through a 6x6 square but another option is she may have had it in there.
Didn't even consider she could have had it in there. That actually makes a lot of sense. Perhaps I'll open the gate for the day and give them a chance to reunite.
 

cbhunter

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Joined
Dec 9, 2013
Messages
13,510
Location
Carroll County
Every year I start seeing fawns in my yard around early to mid-May. I was starting to wonder what was going on, as I haven't seen any this year, and there are tons of doe all around me. I went down to check my garden this morning, which is surrounded entirely by 4-foot tall cattle panels, and got half way through my garden before seeing this little one. Its spots haven't started fading and it looked very thin and frail, making me think it's pretty young. Any idea how it got over the fence? Mature deer could jump 4 feet without a problem, but surely not a fawn this small. Could it have squeezed through a 6x6 inch opening in the cattle panel?

Can't wait to hear some input on this one. Gonna have to keep a close eye on the garden today in hopes of seeing how it gets out.
agree, it probably squeezed through. I would probably help it out. Mom isn't far away and that baby needs milk
 

BSK

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 11, 1999
Messages
68,633
Location
Nashville, TN
Just remember that the fawn hides itself. The mother doe doesn't decide the hiding places. This prevents the mother's scent trail leading directly to the fawn's hiding spot. The mother doe leaves her fawn(s) at a given location, and the fawn(s) go find their own nearby hiding spot. The mother doe then returns after feeding to where she left the fawn(s) and calls them out of hiding. So when you see fawns hiding in weird places, don't blame the doe!

Some of my daughter's friends sent her video of a fawn they found hiding under an old log building. Typical of the time, the log structure was built up on rock pilings, leaving about a 2 and a half foot gap between floor and ground, and the fawn was all curled up in this space. Fawns will pick some weird places to hide, especially in shrubbery right up against houses.
 

Pilchard

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2018
Messages
1,346
Location
Dreaming of Tarpon
Just remember that the fawn hides itself. The mother doe doesn't decide the hiding places. This prevents the mother's scent trail leading directly to the fawn's hiding spot. The mother doe leaves her fawn(s) at a given location, and the fawn(s) go find their own nearby hiding spot. The mother doe then returns after feeding to where she left the fawn(s) and calls them out of hiding. So when you see fawns hiding in weird places, don't blame the doe!

Some of my daughter's friends sent her video of a fawn they found hiding under an old log building. Typical of the time, the log structure was built up on rock pilings, leaving about a 2 and a half foot gap between floor and ground, and the fawn was all curled up in this space. Fawns will pick some weird places to hide, especially in shrubbery right up against houses.
Had one in our rose bush right up against the curb of the street last week. It eventually relocated under my neighbors trampoline.
 

megalomaniac

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2005
Messages
9,696
Location
Mississippi
Just remember that the fawn hides itself. The mother doe doesn't decide the hiding places. This prevents the mother's scent trail leading directly to the fawn's hiding spot. The mother doe leaves her fawn(s) at a given location, and the fawn(s) go find their own nearby hiding spot. The mother doe then returns after feeding to where she left the fawn(s) and calls them out of hiding. So when you see fawns hiding in weird places, don't blame the doe!

Some of my daughter's friends sent her video of a fawn they found hiding under an old log building. Typical of the time, the log structure was built up on rock pilings, leaving about a 2 and a half foot gap between floor and ground, and the fawn was all curled up in this space. Fawns will pick some weird places to hide, especially in shrubbery right up against houses.
Wow, didn't know that! I assumed the mother left the fawn in the most suitable cover, in essence she chose where the fawn should hide.

That's leaving a LOT of survival/ predator avoidance up to the new fawn. Thank God for imprinting and instinct.
 

BSK

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 11, 1999
Messages
68,633
Location
Nashville, TN
Even more interesting, twin (or even triplet) fawns instinctively know not to hide together. That reduces the chances a predator finds and kills both of them. The siblings will hide near each other (within 30 to 40 yards), but not right side by side.
 

Tom Collins

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2012
Messages
214
Location
Tennessee
Even more interesting, twin (or even triplet) fawns instinctively know not to hide together. That reduces the chances a predator finds and kills both of them. The siblings will hide near each other (within 30 to 40 yards), but not right side by side.
I’ve heard that does stimulate their fawns to poop and then will often eat the poop to cover their scent. Amazing creatures.
 

JCDEERMAN

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2008
Messages
12,341
Location
NASHVILLE, TN
Even more interesting, twin (or even triplet) fawns instinctively know not to hide together. That reduces the chances a predator finds and kills both of them. The siblings will hide near each other (within 30 to 40 yards), but not right side by side.
Fascinating!
 

Latest posts

Top