Can CWD cross species barrier?!?!

AT Hiker

AT Hiker

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Jul 3, 2011
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10,964
Location
Clarksville, Tennessee
As this disease spreads the ghastly concern of IT crossing the species barrier might possibly be more than a concern. Personally, I never feared eating venison from areas with CWD. Now, I’m a bit concerned.

SCNs comment on the relevance and concern of CWD made me think of this article I read lately.

“A study in Canada, where the deer disease also is present, found that macaque monkeys had contracted chronic wasting disease after being fed meat from deer that had tested positive for CWD. The findings are the first known transmissions of the prion disease to a primate from eating infected venison.”

https://www.jsonline.com/story/news/loc ... 453371001/

I hate to think I could never eat wild venison again, that’s my biggest fear.


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G

GRIT

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I don't know as much as i should about CWD or EHD but i have been deer hunting sense the late 70s.I don't know the life cycle of a bot fly but i do no that the 4 bucks that me and my wife killed this year they were full of bot fly larvae.I think it's just a matter of the perfect storm here in Tennessee for one of the 2 CWD or EHD to wipe out 90% of the deer heard here.
 
S

Smo

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Sep 6, 2012
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North of Al. & South of Ky.
That’s my concern as well, that was the reason for my post on CWD and EHD.

I never realized the problem was as big as it is in other areas.

Take a look at Wisconsin & Minnesota Game & Fish online.

They have done a lot of studies on the subject.

It started out small in those areas as well.

Some areas report 10% increase in the infected deer over the last decade.

I’m thinking this will be the last year I buy store bought urine.

Apparently there are no laws requiring testing of those products.

I mostly use the scent canisters and don’t apply directly to the ground anymore anyway.

I just feel like if there’s a possibility to endanger the deer population here it’s not worth the risk.

That just my take on it ..... I’m not suggesting everyone should follow suit by any means .

Just something too think about on a cold day.
It really surprises me that there aren’t any laws in place requiring deer farms to test the urine prior to distribution.
 
Jmed

Jmed

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Ooltewah
I'm no scientist or microbiologist, but yes, it can. Didn't this originate in the West in some captive mule deer operation. Remember reading that it crossed over from domestic sheep. And it can be passed from Elk to Deer, basically all cervids if I understand correctly. Yes this something to be worried about and a good reason to have strict laws to prevent its spread. The scary part is once you have it in your area, you can never get rid of it as the "prions" can remain dormant in the dirt.
 
S

Smo

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Joined
Sep 6, 2012
Messages
2,310
Location
North of Al. & South of Ky.
Jmed":rdo3lfwi said:
I'm no scientist or microbiologist, but yes, it can. Didn't this originate in the West in some captive mule deer operation. Remember reading that it crossed over from domestic sheep. And it can be passed from Elk to Deer, basically all cervids if I understand correctly. Yes this something to be worried about and a good reason to have strict laws to prevent its spread. The scary part is once you have it in your area, you can never get rid of it as the "prions" can remain dormant in the dirt.




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