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Second week of practice

swd

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Aug 10, 2018
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337
I am not a year round shooter with my bow. I shoot from March or April until the end of bow season. I got my bow out a couple weeks ago. The first three or four sessions were terrible! I usually reduce my draw weight by 6-8 pounds for the first month or so, but this year I am picking up right where I left off last year (about 66 pounds). I had to sky the bow to get drawn back and could only shoot about 8 or 9 arrows. I am up to 36 arrows each session now and returning to better form until the last 12 or so arrows.

Get your bows out and beat the rush to the pro shop for tuning and repair!!! Now's the time, not two weeks from the opener. You owe it to the animals and yourself ;D
 

JCDEERMAN

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Jul 19, 2008
Messages
12,377
Location
NASHVILLE, TN
Great post and advice. I usually start at the beginning of June and have all the kinks, repairs and form down and completed by mid-July. 10 arrows a night from various ranges, going further and further out as time progresses. That get's me ready for the velvet hunt and CO elk in early September.

I will also add for everyone to continue to practice throughout bow season. Don't stop as soon as the season opens. When it starts getting cooler, it makes it harder to pull back, even on a good buck, when you don't continue practicing. I've been in those shoes.
 

swd

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Aug 10, 2018
Messages
337
I have had a couple of seasons where I found in mid-season practice that my sights had gotten knocked out of zero. It really is critical to maintain that discipline.
 

JCDEERMAN

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Jul 19, 2008
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12,377
Location
NASHVILLE, TN
Been there too. Another thought to consider. Bow shops are always slammed at the same time every year; when season opens and shortly prior. These bow shops are getting fewer and fewer by the numbers. I heard through the grapevine my local bow shop may be closing sometime within the next year or so. Makes me want to get the equipment to DIY. Got to stay on top of things
 

swd

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Joined
Aug 10, 2018
Messages
337
I look at working on my bow about like I do reloading ammo. I know I should; I just don't want to. I reloaded thousands of rounds as a kid. I hated it. Boring monotonous drudge work. I barely like to shoot my rifle. I only do it out of obligation to the animals I hunt.

All that said, I really enjoy shooting my bow. I am just not into tinkering enough to want to work on it. I do my part to make sure my local shop stays in business. I give him nearly all (more than 95%) of my business and never haggle on pricing. I value the expertise and service he brings to the table.
 
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TNDeerGuy

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Joined
Nov 28, 2006
Messages
6,892
Location
Old Hickory/Mt.Juliet, TN
I've shot competitively for years, for this very reason. It will absolutely make you a much better archer, no questions!!

Not only will you learn little nuances of shooting that the average deer hunting archer isn't exposed to, you will also learn tuning and shooting tips and strategies that will also make you a better archer. Which helps with confidence and that is everything with archery!

Most people think that you need all this fancy equipment and prestine colored bows with mile long stabilizers. Truth is... what you hunt with is perfectly fine as there are classes for everyone! These local tournaments are not these big intimidating events you think they are. They are often run by normal people and very low-key—think of working-class golf in the woods. The big national events are quite different, but the local events are practically like going over to your buddies' house and shooting targets in his woods.
 

TN hunter

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Joined
Oct 4, 2007
Messages
557
Location
Maury,Tn
I've shot competitively for years, for this very reason. It will absolutely make you a much better archer, no questions!!

Not only will you learn little nuances of shooting that the average deer hunting archer isn't exposed to, you will also learn tuning and shooting tips and strategies that will also make you a better archer. Which helps with confidence and that is everything with archery!

Most people think that you need all this fancy equipment and prestine colored bows with mile long stabilizers. Truth is... what you hunt with is perfectly fine as there are classes for everyone! These local tournaments are not these big intimidating events you think they are. They are often run by normal people and very low-key—think of working-class golf in the woods. The big national events are quite different, but the local events are practically like going over to your buddies' house and shooting targets in his woods.
Great post!!
 

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