I think every deer hunter should read this book

TX300mag

TX300mag

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"Dead On!" by John Jeanneney

This is a requirement for my children to read now before they begin carrying a gun to the woods. It definitely changed my opinions on several things and made perfect sense considering some of my past experiences.

The author of the book had participated in over 900 deer tracking jobs as THE foremost authority (IMO) in deer tracking dogs. He's the author of "Tracking Dogs for Wounded Deer" which is considered the Bible of deer tracking with dogs.

Probably the biggest challenge to most of our conventional thinking is the idea of "waiting" after a shot. Over the last five or six years, I've stopped "waiting" and unless I'm continuing a hunt attempting to harvest multiple deer, I move quickly. I can remember Bowriter posting about doing this almost 15 years ago and thinking he was crazy. This makes sense, though. I've treated gunshot victims in the field for about 25 years now, I can honestly say I've never told a gunshot victim to get up and run. I've never seen a doctor do that, either. He explains why very well in the book, common sense. If the shot is determined to be a "gut" shot, then you withdraw and wait several hours. Otherwise, track the deer down as quickly as possible.

Although I've never been a big proponent of head shots (I had a bad experience at 17 years old), I have occasionally taken neck shots and been a BIG proponent of spine shots-I have since changed my mind. I can recall several instances where deer have hit the ground like a ton of bricks only to get back up seconds or even minutes later. One of my hunting partners shot the buck of his lifetime (shall remain nameless) last year. He hit the ground only to flop into the bushes SEVERAL minutes later to never be seen again. The author explains why these three are NOT ethical shots and explains why the vitals are the most effective (include a certain margin of error). Keep in mind that this is based on around 1000 deer tracks with a dog.

I highly recommend this book for ANYONE.

https://www.amazon.com/Placement-Hunter ... Jeanneneny
 
Jcalder

Jcalder

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Unless I'm bow hunting, I'm usually on my way to start searching within 5 minutes. Depending on what I find at the impact sight or the first signs of a hit I'll decide what happens next


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R

recurve60#

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I don't wait, even on a bow shot, but If I know it's a gut shot I will leave without even inspecting the place where the deer was standing and come back 6-8 hrs later. Most times the deer will be a very short distance away doa.
 
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BULL MOOSE

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I listened to that guy on Wired to Hunt and it was interesting.
 
W

Winchester

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2 sides to the coin and we humans arent dogs. If you let a wounded deer know your tracking it before it expires, it WILL go farther and faster vs not knowing what happened to it. Bowriters whole theory was to push GUT shot deer.
 
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Mike Belt

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I don't squeeze the trigger on "iffy" shots so when I do, I'm almost certain of where I hit my deer. I have and may again take a spine shot and on rare occasion like when a deer is standing dead under me, I may take a head shot. Otherwise when I shoot the only reason I don't immediately climb down is if I'm attempting a multiple kill.
 
TX300mag

TX300mag

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Winchester":32qk2bfm said:
2 sides to the coin and we humans arent dogs. If you let a wounded deer know your tracking it before it expires, it WILL go farther and faster vs not knowing what happened to it. Bowriters whole theory was to push GUT shot deer.

This book is not about tracking deer with dogs, the other one is. This is about shot placement, identifying the impact of the shot, and beginning the tracking process (if it's even necessary). It sounds as though you have read the book and disagree with Jeanneney? I'd like to know more about your take on the book as it made a lot of sense to me (more and more so as I've applied his principles over the last few years).

I don't remember bowriter advocating pushing gut shot deer, but if he did I stand corrected and would NOT agree with that.
 
H

Hunter 257W

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I've never waited to look for a deer after the shot. Have never lost one nor had one run more than about 60 yards so tracking has never been a big deal. I expect it will happen some day but not yet. My cousin did lose one years ago that we looked for half a day. The way it vanished and the blood stopped made no sense at all but it did.
 
duckduck84

duckduck84

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I am confident I would have recovered 2, if not all 3 of the deer I've lost if I had tracked immediately. Even the doe I grazed this year hung around but I had no other shot when I came up on here because it was dark by then.

Unless I'm staying up for another deer I will get down immediately for any deer that is shot and runs out of sight.

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