Time to Dry age some beef

BamaProud

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I haven't dry aged a prime rib in a couple of years. I think I'me going to give this one 30 days.
Choice cut, ~8 pounds grass fed bone-in (with a couple of marrow bones).
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redblood

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You had me all the way up until I saw grass fed. I don't care for that. I prefer good old fashioned grain fed/ finished beef. But enjoy your treat.
Agree 100 percent. The best marketing tool ever- try to create the iinage if a superior product that just so happens to not cost the investment of grain. We finished beef on our farm (angus and simangus). It take corn to bring the fat and marbling.
 

TX300mag

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Grass-finished takes longer to finish, more labor and fewer animals turned over on same land. There's also nuance when it comes to genetics.

Finishing on grass is a learned skill, definitely something that can easily fall short and affect the quality. I've tasted beef that tastes like fish before.

But done correctly, I prefer grass-finished. Yellow fat, more flavor.
 

redblood

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3 letters every beef eater needs to know- WDA- weight for day of age. Dr Garrigus taught me this as an animals science undergrad. As pointed earlier in this thread. Since grass is low in energy content (caloric) animals gain weight much slower. Therefore grass fed animals will be much older by the time they reach weight and desired finish levels. Small framed cattle -4 and 5 frames- might still
Be able reach acceptable levels on grass/clover mix. 6 frames and up have no shot. If you must go grass fed, you definitely want to go with an early maturing, easy fleshing low frame score animal. Herefords or angus may fit this bill. Definitely need fo stay away from continental breeds like charolais, simmental, and limousine.
 

TX300mag

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3 letters every beef eater needs to know- WDA- weight for day of age. Dr Garrigus taught me this as an animals science undergrad. As pointed earlier in this thread. Since grass is low in energy content (caloric) animals gain weight much slower. Therefore grass fed animals will be much older by the time they reach weight and desired finish levels. Small framed cattle -4 and 5 frames- might still
Be able reach acceptable levels on grass/clover mix. 6 frames and up have no shot. If you must go grass fed, you definitely want to go with an early maturing, easy fleshing low frame score animal. Herefords or angus may fit this bill. Definitely need fo stay away from continental breeds like charolais, simmental, and limousine.

Great info Redblood

I'm going to finish my Dexter and Dexter/Jersey crosses on grass, but just going to be patient. I'm thinking around 30 months. Mixed beef calves, maybe a little faster.

I rely on friends that are experienced in it-definitely want to get it right.
 

jb3

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Grass-finished takes longer to finish, more labor and fewer animals turned over on same land. There's also nuance when it comes to genetics.

Finishing on grass is a learned skill, definitely something that can easily fall short and affect the quality. I've tasted beef that tastes like fish before.

But done correctly, I prefer grass-finished. Yellow fat, more flavor.
Hunted a farm that the pasture wasn't just "grass". It was a blend of different grasses that was grown there for a reason, but to a normal person it looked like a field of regular grass.
 

Popcorn

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For what it's worth, Currently enjoying a beefalo calf that began as a feeding test on a slow grow breed that is genetically predisposed to being grass fed. We love the texture afforded by the bison genes and yes the yellow fat is very important but decent marbling is critical to being flavorful and tender. Calf was on grass with occasional supplements to 700 lbs then moved to lush orchard grass / clover with supplements equal to 1% of body weight 2X week to about 1100 lbs then remaining on grasses with grain feed choice for approximately 8 weeks to final 1360 lbs. very happy with the results but for "ideal" marble the ration of grain feed might be better if incremental increases were employed throughout the 9 month feed up to full choice rather than sudden increase later in the feed out. IE: good marble takes time
 

mike243

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I have had buffalo with yellow fat that I suspected was from corn, never had any beef that had yellow fat, I have tried grass fed several times over the years but keep coming back to traditional raised and finished beef.
 

TX300mag

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I have had buffalo with yellow fat that I suspected was from corn, never had any beef that had yellow fat, I have tried grass fed several times over the years but keep coming back to traditional raised and finished beef.

Yellow fat is more common with mature, grass-fed beef and that might be a more common way to raise buffalo . From my experience corn will result in white fat.
 

TX300mag

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For what it's worth, Currently enjoying a beefalo calf that began as a feeding test on a slow grow breed that is genetically predisposed to being grass fed. We love the texture afforded by the bison genes and yes the yellow fat is very important but decent marbling is critical to being flavorful and tender. Calf was on grass with occasional supplements to 700 lbs then moved to lush orchard grass / clover with supplements equal to 1% of body weight 2X week to about 1100 lbs then remaining on grasses with grain feed choice for approximately 8 weeks to final 1360 lbs. very happy with the results but for "ideal" marble the ration of grain feed might be better if incremental increases were employed throughout the 9 month feed up to full choice rather than sudden increase later in the feed out. IE: good marble takes time

Feed is reserved for finishing usually because of cost and also because marbling (and weight gain) is most efficient after skeletal growth is generally complete, hence the reason
 

Popcorn

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Feed is reserved for finishing usually because of cost and also because marbling (and weight gain) is most efficient after skeletal growth is generally complete, hence the reason
I don't disagree but the beefalo presents a bit of a challenge in that it is not a small breed but is a slow grower / gainer. They can take several months longer to reach desired process weight than an angus or straight beef breed. It appears even though less efficient, gradual increases of grain are better for marbling over a sudden increase which in the beefalo created large deposits of fat rather than improving the marble. At 1360 lbs they still had not completed their frame but were exceptional cuts with a fantastic grain. They could have been better I believe but at a much greater cost and I was up against an appointment with the processor.
 

TX300mag

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I don't disagree but the beefalo presents a bit of a challenge in that it is not a small breed but is a slow grower / gainer. They can take several months longer to reach desired process weight than an angus or straight beef breed. It appears even though less efficient, gradual increases of grain are better for marbling over a sudden increase which in the beefalo created large deposits of fat rather than improving the marble. At 1360 lbs they still had not completed their frame but were exceptional cuts with a fantastic grain. They could have been better I believe but at a much greater cost and I was up against an appointment with the processor.

Great info, popcorn! That sounds like a cool project
 

redblood

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Great info Redblood

I'm going to finish my Dexter and Dexter/Jersey crosses on grass, but just going to be patient. I'm thinking around 30 months. Mixed beef calves, maybe a little faster.

I rely on friends that are experienced in it-definitely want to get it right.
HARD TO BEAT JERSEY BEEF- They dont yield well, but man is it tender and flavorful
 
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