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Would you ...... buy an electric truck?

BMan

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Feb 6, 2006
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Middle TN
Electricity, at least here, mostly comes from natural gas and nuclear. TVA is still spending a ton of money on both of those, at least for now. The Texas failure had more to do with NG failure then anything and poor regulatory policies/requirements (probably would require a different thread to dive into).

I agree, there is nothing green about an all-electric vehicle, for me it would be about the performance. I would actually expect the towing performance to be more impressive with the electric truck but time will tell on the performance numbers...remember I said 10 years from now, I expect technology to improve significantly. If they can get the range up to 400-500 miles with decently quick recharge then I'd be fine with it.

The grid is an interesting and valid discussion in certain areas. Then again TVA just had some pretty significant incentives to add load to the system (electrification incentive to pay people not to install NG equipment) due to reduction in load on the grid over time. Buildings are becoming significantly more efficient and improving all the time.

At least on the Tesla side, you can get an 80% recharge in 20 minutes and get 300-350 miles on that charge. Not ideal but not terrible.

That's why I said "new." Increased demand will either require more supply, rationing, or massive price increases to convince users to not use the AC, television, washer, etc. The two most recent nuke plants in the US were started in 1973 and came online in 1996 and 2016 respectively (Watts Bar 1 and 2). As the environmental nazism will get far worse, I can't see nuke plants or any fossil fuel plants coming online in the foreseeable future without tremendous legal problems and excessive costs.

Performance should be hellaciously good, as you can put a lot of power into fairly small electric motors. So long as they can be charged, anyway. All comes back to the electricity...
 
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huntinkev

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Nov 23, 2006
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Humphreys
NO, not right now. Some days for work I may drive 500-1000 miles, and some of our foreman too, we have projects scattered all over TN. How can we effectively do this with an electric vehicle.....you can't.

To put into perspective, we have a 2017 truck that has 120,000 miles, a 2016 that has 175,000 miles, a 2014 that has over 400,000 miles. We run a lot of miles and we wouldn't be able to do our jobs as effectively limited by electric vehicle. That doesn't take into account all our hauling of equipment with a road tractor and lowboy.
 

Ed B

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Sep 27, 2009
Messages
526
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Middle TN
That's why I said "new." Increased demand will either require more supply, rationing, or massive price increases to convince users to not use the AC, television, washer, etc. The two most recent nuke plants in the US were started in 1973 and came online in 1996 and 2016 respectively (Watts Bar 1 and 2). As the environmental nazism will get far worse, I can't see nuke plants or any fossil fuel plants coming online in the foreseeable future without tremendous legal problems and excessive costs.

Performance should be hellaciously good, as you can put a lot of power into fairly small electric motors. So long as they can be charged, anyway. All comes back to the electricity...

I'm not disagreeing that there are significant concerns about how to handle that increase load. I'm also a believer that technology will improve to allow it to happen fairly easily. I'm probably wrong but I see EV's as a luxury item for quite awhile. The people that want them will be able to afford upgraded infrastructure at their home. Time of day rates are also going to be part of it, that will work to help spread the demand out. I could easily see it being as simple as you go to charge your car, the AC unit for your house turns off for 20 minutes while you charge.

I don't hide behind the green part of it all. My belief is the crazy toxic nature of the massive batteries that are in these cars is far worse then conventional gasoline but time will tell.

Nuclear has a tough hill to climb, the amount of regulation involved does not make it cost effective. I thought I read recently where Brown's Ferry just completed an overhaul of one of their reactors which is major undertaking but the cost is just insane.

I was intrigued on the fossil fuel side, found this https://www.tva.com/environment/environmental-stewardship/integrated-resource-plan . There is quite a bit of NG plants planned for in the future...an alarming amount of PV as well. I can't imagine the toxic fallout from all these PV panels we are installing when those things go bad.

It will be very interesting to see the transition to EV's, I'm with a lot of you guys, I don't see how they are going to ever be able to phase out gas with so many currently on the road.

Back to the original question on an electric truck. Like I said, yes within the next 10 years but not now...even then I would think it would be the exception and not the norm.
 

hard county

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Nov 26, 2007
Messages
763
Pure electric? Definitely no. Hybrid or plugin hybrid? Absolutely. The truck gets better mileage, better torque, and the whole thing is a big generator you can use for whatever you happen to need 110 ac power for.
 

BlackBelt

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Aug 9, 2008
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5,755
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SouthWest TN
That was another reason they wanted Trump out of office. He made us energy independent and we enjoyed cheap fossil fuels. As long as gasoline was cheaper than electricity there was no way electric cars were going to be more than a luxury option for people. But when gas prices hit $5-6 per gallon the sheep start making noise. And in steps the electric car, right on cue. The sheep buy their car and pipe down like good little citizens should.
 
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waynesworld

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May 13, 2012
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Shelbyville, Tennessee
I'm not disagreeing that there are significant concerns about how to handle that increase load. I'm also a believer that technology will improve to allow it to happen fairly easily. I'm probably wrong but I see EV's as a luxury item for quite awhile. The people that want them will be able to afford upgraded infrastructure at their home. Time of day rates are also going to be part of it, that will work to help spread the demand out. I could easily see it being as simple as you go to charge your car, the AC unit for your house turns off for 20 minutes while you charge.

I don't hide behind the green part of it all. My belief is the crazy toxic nature of the massive batteries that are in these cars is far worse then conventional gasoline but time will tell.

Nuclear has a tough hill to climb, the amount of regulation involved does not make it cost effective. I thought I read recently where Brown's Ferry just completed an overhaul of one of their reactors which is major undertaking but the cost is just insane.

I was intrigued on the fossil fuel side, found this https://www.tva.com/environment/environmental-stewardship/integrated-resource-plan . There is quite a bit of NG plants planned for in the future...an alarming amount of PV as well. I can't imagine the toxic fallout from all these PV panels we are installing when those things go bad.

It will be very interesting to see the transition to EV's, I'm with a lot of you guys, I don't see how they are going to ever be able to phase out gas with so many currently on the road.

Back to the original question on an electric truck. Like I said, yes within the next 10 years but not now...even then I would think it would be the exception and not the norm.
Where do you get that Nuc's are more expensive? I while back I looked and they are one of the most cost effective. It is not the regulation but rather the negative campaign adds that face them. But that normally comes from the fuel industry. Operating a plant has regulations but we have more plants then people think. Ever AC carrier has at least two :) subs have them. If we keep our heads in the sand and believe all the negative adds we will be our own demise. The national power supply need to be addressed with a non political group to solve all the states issues. Collectively we have the power it is stupid laws and politics that gets in the way of accessing it.

By the way Hydro I think was the most cost effective and I think solar or wind was last.
 

backyardtndeer

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Jul 29, 2015
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West Tennessee
I would be interested in results of a non biased scientific test showing green houses gases for generation of electric to power an electric truck vs a diesel that has the latest def system. Total miles performing under loads in real world situations.
 

Chiflyguy

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Joined
Aug 6, 2019
Messages
421
There’s a lot of factors before we phase out gasoline cars.
I don’t see it happening.
A lot of the younger generation can’t handle working at McDonalds.
Uncle Joe said he’s gonna put in 50,000 chargers nationwide.
Well, he better get goin.
 

Ed B

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Sep 27, 2009
Messages
526
Location
Middle TN
Where do you get that Nuc's are more expensive? I while back I looked and they are one of the most cost effective. It is not the regulation but rather the negative campaign adds that face them. But that normally comes from the fuel industry. Operating a plant has regulations but we have more plants then people think. Ever AC carrier has at least two :) subs have them. If we keep our heads in the sand and believe all the negative adds we will be our own demise. The national power supply need to be addressed with a non political group to solve all the states issues. Collectively we have the power it is stupid laws and politics that gets in the way of accessing it.

By the way Hydro I think was the most cost effective and I think solar or wind was last.
The cost of nuclear is in the construction component. It is insanely expensive to build. Make one weld, takes a couple days to get x-rayed, then make another pass, another couple days to get x-rayed and approved. My discussions are a couple years old but at the time nuclear was on par with NG, with significantly increased risk. I always assumed that nuclear would be the clear cost winner, but the data showed otherwise. Granted, this was all specific to TVA.

Hyrdo is actually one of the most expensive options. They cost a ton to build and produce relatively low power. Per TVA's plan I linked above, they only show maintaining the current hydro fleet with no plans for additional capacity.

I'll try to find some hard data on a later but I was surprised as I thought nuclear and hydro would be the cheapest by far but the construction costs is what makes them unattractive.
 

waynesworld

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Joined
May 13, 2012
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2,840
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Shelbyville, Tennessee
Sorry but you don't look at what the initial cost is but what the cost is over time as they are depreciated. When you look at cost per KW it includes the cost of building it and the cost of refueling, maintenance and then disposing of. If you have any thing different please share.
 

Snowwolfe

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Dec 2, 2013
Messages
3,087
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Between Crossville and Cookeville
EV's have a lot to overcome. They are good for city dwellers. But then you need chargers at every parking location. The only way EV becomes mainstream is when the roads are all changed to allow vehicles to charge as they are being driven.
Another option is the development and improvement of nano battery technology.
 

TAFKAP

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Joined
Nov 6, 2009
Messages
13,714
Location
Memphis
Where do you get that Nuc's are more expensive? I while back I looked and they are one of the most cost effective. It is not the regulation but rather the negative campaign adds that face them. But that normally comes from the fuel industry. Operating a plant has regulations but we have more plants then people think. Ever AC carrier has at least two :) subs have them. If we keep our heads in the sand and believe all the negative adds we will be our own demise. The national power supply need to be addressed with a non political group to solve all the states issues. Collectively we have the power it is stupid laws and politics that gets in the way of accessing it.

By the way Hydro I think was the most cost effective and I think solar or wind was last.
Per kilowatt, a nuke plant is the cheapest energy to produce. Unfortunately, new and updating regulations are making them harder and more costly to upgrade and re-license. Since many of them are approaching the end of their license period, a lot are decommissioning rather than renewing a license.

Many nuke sites are situated in areas to serve high-density population centers (read: Blue States). The newest nuke plant in the US right now is Watts Bar, whose Unit 1 reactor is approaching 25 years old. And with Westinghouse filing bankruptcy recently, shutting down construction at the Summer plant, there aren't many resources available for new construction. Siemens Energy is covered up from the Westinghouse fallout, and I don't see GE doing much for developing new reactor technology.

Meanwhile, all the remaining sites are going to have to keep replacing components at higher and higher costs of replacement, maintenance, and upgrade.
 

Rob R.

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Joined
Apr 25, 2011
Messages
6,888
Location
Germantown TN and Oxford MS
It all boils down to 2 things for me, price and range. However, our current electrical grid and charger accessibility is a serious negative. Funny how many greenies jump on the EV train. They forgot where the electric comes from.
View attachment 70054
Totally agree. I don’t believe they could build enough power plants to generate enough electricity if all vehicles were electric.
And if they could build enough power plants the libs and tree huggers will never allow them to be built.
 

Wildcat

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Joined
Jun 10, 2000
Messages
59,914
Location
Western Ky.
It's not just the power for the electric autos.

Say we DO go to all-electric autos and EVERYBODY buys one and uses LESS AND LESS gas every day.

Well, where is all that EXTRA electricity going to come from???

#1, we already have problems some days making sure everybody had enough electricity without any brownouts which we are seeing more and more of WITHOUT the number of electric autos we are talking about.

#2, we do NOT have the power grid that can handle all that extra electricity. Keeping UP WITH THE POPULATION just to keep our homes and businesses powered up and running is going to take a far better power grid than we have today. Now with all the growth we will have in both homes and business you add the HUNDREDS OF MILLIONS of electric autos to the mix and by 2050 we will need a power grid that can handle FIVE TIMES the power we have today.,

#3. Somebody is going to pay for all that, guess who???
 

fairchaser

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Joined
Sep 13, 2011
Messages
6,920
Location
TN, USA
As soon as they have a self driving electric truck, I’m all in. I can crawl in the back seat and sleep. Once I get to my hunting spot, I’ll wake up and go hunt. I figure it will be between 5-10 years if not sooner.
 

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