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Wood Identification

Grainger

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Anybody care to hazard a guess as to what kind of wood this is?

It's definitely not any kind of Oak, that much I do know.

Doesn't have any strong smell.

Seems dense and heavy, whatever it is, it looks to have the makings of some good firewood.

Came from a lot where they're about to build a house, it was laying close enough to the side of the road to be in "fair game" territory, so I rolled up early one morning and went to cutting and loading.

Came from a mature, ridge top, forest in Knox Co.

It's much easier to identify a tree if it's still standing, as opposed to cut log lying on the ground.

3D4DA653-4F2D-4369-BA97-3B2CD2D48FF6.jpeg 0EA07EF5-41FD-4AF7-A7D1-E801D8710601.jpeg


Just wanted to see if anybody could identify it by the pics provided, and so I can learn it and remember if it's good firewood.
 

Grainger

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Sure looks like a white oak from here.
But I guess under the right conditions it could be a white maple.
I thought it was too, when I gave it a "drive-by", right before dark the night before.

But once I got into it, I could tell it wasn't.
1). It didn't have that "soury smell". that White Oak especially has.

2). It's not as "fibrous" as White Oak

When I got it home, I compared it to some known White Oak, the bark on the White Oak has a different texture, but the color is very similar.
 

Grainger

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Sugar maple
Your "handle" would lead me to believe you've seen a few cut trees. That wasn't a choice I considered, though certainly a possibility in the woods where it was cut from.

Sugar Maple is top notch wood, a lot of Sugar Maples spread wide, and low--doesn't have a nice long straight trunk on it, which makes good form for firewood. A Sugar Maple growing in a mature forest prolly takes a different form
 

Grainger

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Alright, if I count right; I've got 3 mentions of Maple, 4 of Elm, and 3 of Hickory.

This wood is for next Winter, and may not get split until a year from now, maybe I'll hand split a log of it tomorrow and give it the "Crappie Luck Test".

Thanks to all who chimed in!
 

Chaneylake

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on the wings of a snow white dove
Alright, if I count right; I've got 3 mentions of Maple, 4 of Elm, and 3 of Hickory.

This wood is for next Winter, and may not get split until a year from now, maybe I'll hand split a log of it tomorrow and give it the "Crappie Luck Test".

Thanks to all who chimed in!
If the wood splits easily with axe then it's not elm.
 

poorhunter

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Hickman county
Alright, if I count right; I've got 3 mentions of Maple, 4 of Elm, and 3 of Hickory.

This wood is for next Winter, and may not get split until a year from now, maybe I'll hand split a log of it tomorrow and give it the "Crappie Luck Test".

Thanks to all who chimed in!
No way it’s elm or hickory. I’ll eat my crow if I’m wrong.
 

Grainger

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No way it’s elm or hickory. I’ll eat my crow if I’m wrong.
No need to break out the bottle of bar-b-que sauce yet. We'll give it The "Crappie Luck Test", an then we'll be inside the log, see what the grain looks like.

There's also a couple of forums for total firewood geeks, I can post the pics over there also, see what they have to say.

Thought this would be great place to start, after all, you might climb a tree just like this and perch in it come Fall.
 

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