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Why do people have to be pricks!

Joined
Apr 30, 2021
Messages
20
Location
East tn.
Have not been down in a couple weeks. Went for a nice mornings hunt and never heard or seen a peep of a turkey.
Only to find where somebody made a path through the fence row with a SxS......actually found part of the fender well they tore off.
I have posted signs, put up numerous cables every time they do this....it is getting old!!
Trying something new this go round.
Layed a tree stand at the base of a tree 75 yards from my house, came back months later and found that someone had hung the stand and put their seat in it!! Good grief
 

SES

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2011
Messages
1,771
Location
Corryton, Tn
Rancocas I don’t understand your “have to hunt”. I paid for my land by working my butt off and don’t want anyone else on it without permission. If your hunting to feed yourself then I see it as a budget problem. If there is money for a computer and internet to post on TNdeer, or smart phone bill for internet, then that money could be used for food. Hunt public land and don’t trespass on others land who did make it a priority to save their money to purchase the land.
Thank you! I used to drive 2 hours to hunt public land until I was able to buy a piece of my own. I lease, as in pay for, the right to hunt on the land adjoining mine. I don’t understand the logic behind people just hunting on someone’s land that they know that they are not supposed to be on and them thinking that it is ok. It’s illegal. It’s stealing. Ever heard the expression,”can’t trust a thief?”
 

KPH

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2005
Messages
7,535
Location
Hendersonville Tenn
Times change. I hope ya'll don't take this wrong, but I have mixed feeling about the trespassing thing.
Sure, I respect private property and an owner's right to keep it private. However, I'm old and I remember different times and a different perspective.
I began hunting in the 1950's. I well remember that if a property was not "posted" then it was considered okay to hunt there; no permission needed to be asked. Further, posted property was rare.
Of course we respected the land. We left gates how we found them, open or closed. We were careful crossing fences so as not to break them down. We did not litter. We stayed away from livestock and out of standing crops. Often, we offered to share our game with the land owner. Sometimes we helped the owner fix a fence, bale hay, or whatever.
Then, in the mid 1960's things began to change. I went away in the military for a few years. When I came home I took my little brother small game hunting to a farm that our family had been hunting for many years.
It was not "posted". Well, while my brother and I were in the woods the farmer and his son used a couple of tractors to block in my car. They waited for us to return and then read us the riot act for trespassing. I was taken completely by surprise. Such had never happened to me before and was completely unprecedented.
Things have steadily gone downhill since then. The population has boomed, now being almost three times what it was back in the 1950's and 1960's. Posted property seems to be the norm now. Lands open for general hunting, or even just to stroll around and enjoy the outdoors, are hard to find in some areas. Public lands such as game lands and parks are often over crowded, over used, and game is scarce in those places.
So, if you are a dedicated hunter without the means of acquiring your own land, the public lands are far from you or are void of game - then I ask you; what are you to do? Put away your guns, and go vegetate in front of the boob-tube? Or, play Daniel Boone and do your hunting while sneaking around in indian territory while trying to avoid the indians.
I see it as quite a dilemma for many people.
Yes, of course, many people now days don't know and therefor don't respect the land. They think nothing of crushing crops under their feet, popping staples out of a fence post when they climb over, or dropping their lunch wrappers on the ground. They just have not been brought up right.
Yep. Quite a dilemma.
There are just too d*&!! many people in the world!
back in that time i could go across multiple farms hunting wave at the people and they would wave back need a drink of water for yourself or your dog no problem just knock on a door and ask i have even offered them any game i had. times sure have changed with people who have no respect for others.
 

KPH

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2005
Messages
7,535
Location
Hendersonville Tenn
Guys, as much as I want to place some good boobytraps out there please do NOT do it. It's great to talk about them and stuff but in all 50 states, it's against the law. If someone gets hurt by a boobytrap on YOUR property (nails in boards) you WILL get arrested, you WILL get sued, you WILL lose in a court of law and you WILL pay.

I know it should not be this way but that's the law. That is the very reason the American people along the border with Mexico do not place boobytraps on their own property. Now some may have but they got in trouble if caught.
i know of one case where the man had to pay for servile 4-wheeler tires
 

Bambi Buster

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Joined
Jan 29, 2004
Messages
19,168
Location
Middle Tennessee
........But theft and vandalism is not what I am talking about. What I am saying is that if I had nowhere else to go (I do) then I would have no alternative but to slip in to some private property to hunt. I would leave as little sign of my being there as possible; maybe just a footprint here and there.
Remember, even Robin Hood was a poacher. ():~)

.........
Wow. :rolleyes:
 

Rancocas

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2005
Messages
324
Location
Ocoee Country/Cleveland
Well, as I expected most of you are not getting my point.
If you are interested enough, go back and carefully read all of my posts on this topic. Maybe something will finally click.
'Nuff said.
 

KPH

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2005
Messages
7,535
Location
Hendersonville Tenn
Well, as I expected most of you are not getting my point.
If you are interested enough, go back and carefully read all of my posts on this topic. Maybe something will finally click.
'Nuff said.
they are born in a different time and don's relies there is a thing as good neighbors. when deer came in much changed. people who didn't respect others property like was did back in the day came into play . i knew if i did anything wrong on a neighbors place my parents would know about it before i got home i knew this and treated their place like i would have on our place
 

Laserman1

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Joined
Sep 25, 2016
Messages
928
I did re-read your post. You mad a lot of good points in both post. What got me was the “ by god I don’t care who owned it I’m gonna sneak in and hunt it “ attitude. If you don’t own it you shouldn’t be on it. If you can’t afford land , then you may have to give up a recreational activity like hunting until you find some pubic land you can hunt. We don’t own the animals but we do own the property they are on.
 

Omega

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2018
Messages
2,025
Location
Clarksville, TN
they are born in a different time and don's relies there is a thing as good neighbors. when deer came in much changed. people who didn't respect others property like was did back in the day came into play . i knew if i did anything wrong on a neighbors place my parents would know about it before i got home i knew this and treated their place like i would have on our place
I get it, as a kid I used to hunt small game all over the place, and couple farmers would buy us a bunch of .22s to kill as many prairie dogs off their land as possible. But times were different then, kids had much more respect for others property than now. And we weren't kids anymore, we shouldn't expect to be treated the same anymore.
 

KPH

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2005
Messages
7,535
Location
Hendersonville Tenn
I get it, as a kid I used to hunt small game all over the place, and couple farmers would buy us a bunch of .22s to kill as many prairie dogs off their land as possible. But times were different then, kids had much more respect for others property than now. And we weren't kids anymore, we shouldn't expect to be treated the same anymore.
back then it was the same with adults as young people may be it was just where i grew up and lived
 

Bambi Buster

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Joined
Jan 29, 2004
Messages
19,168
Location
Middle Tennessee
I did re-read your post. You mad a lot of good points in both post. What got me was the “ by god I don’t care who owned it I’m gonna sneak in and hunt it “ attitude. If you don’t own it you shouldn’t be on it. If you can’t afford land , then you may have to give up a recreational activity like hunting until you find some pubic land you can hunt. We don’t own the animals but we do own the property they are on.
^^^^^This^^^^^^^^^
 

Gronk

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2021
Messages
158
Location
Lewisburg, TN
they are born in a different time and don's relies there is a thing as good neighbors. when deer came in much changed. people who didn't respect others property like was did back in the day came into play . i knew if i did anything wrong on a neighbors place my parents would know about it before i got home i knew this and treated their place like i would have on our place
Read both of your posts several times all the way through, start to finish. Private property is not community property. Somebody worked their arse of for that little bit of land they call their own. Can I go to your place and take your car to the store because I don’t have a car of my own.... I promise to leave it better than when I took it? Can I use your home and appliances to store needed food items because it’s a necessity and I can’t afford my own (because of poor life decisions)? Can I park in your driveway if you don’t notice and wave to me when I drive by because it’s neighborly? In this life, in modern times, YOU get what YOU pay for. If you haven’t planned accordingly for your “wants”, that’s on you. If it’s a SHTF scenario, people would poach you for poaching their resources, just saying...
 

MUP

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Supporter
Joined
Aug 1, 2007
Messages
77,377
Location
Just North of Chatt-town
Well, here in America, we're not peasants who are held down by the royals, despite the Federal govt trying their darndest. We have the option to work and provide for ourselves, as little or as much as we choose, and with work comes opportunity, opportunity to maybe buy a piece of land for oneself, to hunt on, live on, or both. I don't buy the "have to hunt" argument in this day and time, and even if it were the case, there is public land available to do so, just get on your smartphone or computer and find it. ;) And as far as crossing others property back in "the day", I've done it too, and it was their choice to either allow me to do so, or not. I've experienced both as a young teenager "back in the day".
 

Grill-n-man

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Joined
Jan 10, 2013
Messages
748
Location
rhea county tn
Try your best to get pictures of them but each time you find evidence of trespassing call the local police and make a report. This will do a couple things -establish documentation that you have a problem, searching for a legal end to the problem, with a little luck they will get caught, but most importantly it will establish solid proof of the problem and your willingness to legally and peacefully resolve the issue in case on a small chance someone gets hurt or a physical conflict takes place. Whether you own the property or have a lease contract you have the only legal right to the property and this entitlement crap ain’t legal.
Biggest problem you is the same I have and many others is the entitlement to what others have being taught and practiced. It doesn’t matter what you did in the 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s etc It doesn’t matter if they just kids or out for a Sunday stroll. It doesn’t matter if it’s posted or not as Tennessee law is specific on the explanation of trespassing. What truly matters it ain’t yours, you didn’t work for it, you didn’t pay for it, you don’t have an entitlement to anything so stay off it period. There is not any acceptable excuse to be one what’s another except a life or death emergency. Don’t care if you 12 or 112 you ain’t entitled to hack.
 

Rancocas

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Joined
Nov 29, 2005
Messages
324
Location
Ocoee Country/Cleveland
D*&! it! Some of you people are real ignoramuses. You are reading things into my posts that are not there.

First off; I'm not a poor smuck who can't afford any land. I am actually better off than most in my retirement, and I currently own land in three states.
Bambi Buster; said “ by god I don’t care who owned it I’m gonna sneak in and hunt it “ attitude. You have that in quotation marks as if it is a direct quote. Where the h*$! did that come from? I never said that! I think the "attitude" is all yours - although I sure am getting one now.
Laserman1 quoted me as saying; "have to hunt". NO. I said "I will hunt." There is a difference.
And Gronk, I don't have two posts here. Including this one there are five. Beginning on page two.

"What we have here is a failure to communicate." (Anyone remember that phrase from the movie "Cool Hand Luke"?)
Okay. Maybe it is my fault for being a poor communicator.

Yeah, times have changed. Much for the worst!

I'm done. Bye.
 

KPH

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2005
Messages
7,535
Location
Hendersonville Tenn
Read both of your posts several times all the way through, start to finish. Private property is not community property. Somebody worked their arse of for that little bit of land they call their own. Can I go to your place and take your car to the store because I don’t have a car of my own.... I promise to leave it better than when I took it? Can I use your home and appliances to store needed food items because it’s a necessity and I can’t afford my own (because of poor life decisions)? Can I park in your driveway if you don’t notice and wave to me when I drive by because it’s neighborly? In this life, in modern times, YOU get what YOU pay for. If you haven’t planned accordingly for your “wants”, that’s on you. If it’s a SHTF scenario, people would poach you for poaching their resources, just saying...
different time different attitude we where neighbors, and friends helped each other out had respect for each other sorry you can't understand that.
 

BSK

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Joined
Mar 11, 1999
Messages
68,510
Location
Nashville, TN
I truly understand those who become disheartened watching all the big chunks of huntable land being bought up by "the rich." I know this is a major trend because I work for these people. In my area, most of the really big chunks of land are owned by doctors and lawyers (for hunting). But there are a ton of smaller lands (100-200 acres) that are owned by people who are very blue-collar. The land has been in their families for generations. They are definitely not rich. Of course, getting into buying land now - considering land prices - is very difficult. At that same time I see blue-collar guys with $50K trucks and $40K bass boats. That $90K would have been an awesome down-payment on a chunk of land.

And although it's true, none of us landowners own the wildlife that use our properties, we DO OWN access to them. Once that animal crosses our property line, they are fair game. But as landowners we own the right to pursue those animals while they are on our land.
 

iowavf

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Joined
Oct 25, 2005
Messages
7,455
Location
southwest iowa
The only dilemma I see, is the lack of respect by those who trespass. I am 58, and was taught to knock on doors, ask permission.. and when given, leave the place better than it was before you gained permission.. and if told no, thank them anyway and move on.

Laws provide the guidance, and its there for a reason.
Was taught he same way. I know times are changing, but you have to respect the landowner because it's his property to do what he'd like.
 

iowavf

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Joined
Oct 25, 2005
Messages
7,455
Location
southwest iowa
Yes, I see your point about the lack of ethics in society today.
I did state in my first post that although asking permission was not necessary if the land was not posted, we did respect the land and did no damage. In most cases the owners probably never knew we were there.

Times have changed and too many people have no respect for much of anything. Very sad. I do not blame you at all for prosecuting trespassers to the full extent of the law. Further more, I have no tolerance whatsoever for thieves and vandals. Hot tar and feathers is what they deserve, and hanging if they are caught at it again.

But theft and vandalism is not what I am talking about. What I am saying is that if I had nowhere else to go (I do) then I would have no alternative but to slip in to some private property to hunt. I would leave as little sign of my being there as possible; maybe just a footprint here and there.
Remember, even Robin Hood was a poacher. ():~)

Oh BTW; We chose our current home over 20 years ago partly based on the fact that 200 acres of adjoining property was owned by a paper company and it was open for people to hunt and wander around. Then, about 10 years ago that land was sold. We didn't even know it was for sale until after it had been bought by a local millionaire. He sold most of the timber off it, subdivided it, and put it up for auction. I regret now that I didn't bid on the clear-cut land. A Florida native bought 70 acres of it directly behind my property. He hired a bunch of Mexicans to encircle his entire property with barbed wire and post no trespassing signs about every 20 feet all around the property. Where the trail led from my back yard into that property they plastered the no trespassing signs in the middle of my trail and on both sides of it. They did the same where I had a ground blind at the base of a large oak that was just a few yards inside his property line.
He had quarrels with other neighbors about the property line. He had it surveyed and found that boundary lines did not always agree. One neighbor had his back fence 15 feet inside the new guy's property. It had been that way for over 30 years! Instead of being nice, the new guy approached the neighbor and the first thing he said; "Your fence is on my property. Move it." There were similar incidents with several different neighbors. Yeah, I know, under the right of adverse possession the neighbors could have fought him in court, but to my knowledge none of them chose to pursue the issue. In my own situation, I had a log backstop to my shooting range piled up right on top of the property line. The new guy used a bulldozer to push it 20 feet or so up into my property.
Now, 10 years later the Florida guy has a house and barn back there. He does not talk to his neighbors and there is still much resentment against him. He patrols his property boundaries on a tractor that has a scabbard with a shotgun in it. He shoots back there at various places, day and night. I have heard him shooting at 3 in the morning. Not just a random shot either, he fires off a lot of rounds. I wonder where he gets his ammo supply.
He did give us a phone call last winter after a snowfall. Seems that he found someone's footprints in the snow. The person had climbed over his gate and walked in almost up to his house, then turned around and went back. He wanted to know if it was me. No. It was not me.
The guy is sometimes away for months at a time, traveling for his job. I have told him that in exchange for hunting rights I would look after his property for him while he is gone. However, he refused my offer.
I miss where it's ok to hunt on other people's property without permission if they don't have it posted? I'm sorry but that was still trespassing.
 

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