• Help Support TNDeer:

Skid steer or Dozer

Mr. Hawk

Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2003
Messages
730
Location
Putnam co
I have another post about me thinking about getting a D5 dozer I found for my 270 acres that’s mostly hilly timber, ridges and rocks. A buddy is suggesting I buy a skid steer instead. I’d like to be able to clear stuff and work on my miles of logging roads. Which would be best? I already has a tractor w/bucket with bushhog.
 

Hunter 257W

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2012
Messages
10,335
Location
Franklin County
Yeah, I'd like to read thoughts on which is best myself. I need something that could clear small trees, say no more than 8" at the base and push back field edges. Also has to be on tracks because I have such a problem with wild pear trees with thorns. I no longer dare try to bush hog the things because of tire damage to my tractors. I think a small to medium bulldozer is what I need but maybe a skidsteer could work too. Don't have experience with them to know.
 
Primary

Primary

TNDeer Assistant
Here are some related products that TNDeer members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TNDeer’s partner,Primary, where you can find links to TNDeer discussions about these products.

 
 

Urban_Hunter

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 15, 2012
Messages
5,402
Location
Hendersonville
Of the two, I would go with a skid steer. A dozer is great for making new roads, but a skid steer should be able to maintain what you have and also be a lot more versatile around the farm for other duties
 

Planking

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 18, 2013
Messages
5,106
Location
Tennessee
It depends on how hilly, rocky and rough it is. I don't think my skid steer is the best tool around real steep and rocky terrain. Unlike a dozer or mini ex it will do very little going up a steep hill. I have some steep rocky woods i would like to clear out the logging roads on but its just beyond what it can do. I got it stuck and it was a nightmare to get it out. Farm and field work its hard to beat. I push over 8 inch trees with it and dig out much bigger ones. It will clear out smaller stuff fast but when it gets steep or big rocks are involved i would be on something else. You can fill the tires or buy the airless tires if you have tree thorns and prefer those over tracks.
 

waynesworld

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 13, 2012
Messages
2,503
Location
Shelbyville, Tennessee
I had 90 acres and tried using a skid steer first and did not work. Ended up being the death to the skid steer. They are great for what they are used for and may get one later but for going out and pushing trees the thorn bushes it is not heavy enough. I have seen the ones with the brush eater on front tear some stuff up but they looked expensive. The mini excavator may work but you have to go slow at the start. On a small piece of land i used a full size excavator. I love working with the big things pushing trees over gives you the tool time feeling.
 

mike243

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2006
Messages
15,924
Location
east tn
I haven't used 1 of the larger skid steers with the tracks but the older 1's that had the tracks that wrapped around the tires went pretty dang good, a smaller high lift would be my pick, I like to be able to pickup a bucket of dirt/rocks and dump it some where and not have to push it.
 

TRIGGER

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2011
Messages
8,036
Location
Cunningham TN
A skid steer is a whole lot more versatile. There are countless things that can be done with one but pushing over trees or cutting in roads are not things for a skid steer. It just all depends on what you are wanting/needing done. If I were just looking for a piece of equipment to help out around the farm it would be a New Holland track skid steer. I say New Holland because that’s what I own now and have owned other brands but the New Holland is just a tough reliable machine. (Mine runs every day as I use it for work). A dozier is great for doing a few things but you can rent (or buy) attachments For a skid steer that allow you to do so much more.
 

bjohnson

Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2010
Messages
904
Location
Lawrence County, TN
Pick the right tool for the job. A dozer will clear what you need quicker. The downside is once you're done clearing and maintaining your roads the dozer will sit until needed.
 

jetwrnch

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Joined
Aug 22, 2003
Messages
2,064
Location
Kingston
Dozer because you already have a tractor with a bucket. I sold my Bobcat because of instability on hills.
 

Stykbow

New Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2015
Messages
1,200
Location
Campbell county
My dad had a John Deere dozer about the size of the one your looking at and an excavator. He sold the dozer because the excavator would do pretty much anything the dozer would as far as clearing land. He also pointed out that you didn’t have to worry as much about limbs and tree tops falling on you because of how you pushed trees down with the bucket.


If you’re going to be stupid, you’d better be tough!
 

TNTreeman

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2017
Messages
1,947
Location
Franklin Tn
Skid steer and dozer really are two seperate work horses. I love an excavator especially with a thumb. It all depends on what you want to do and terrain.
 

waynesworld

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 13, 2012
Messages
2,503
Location
Shelbyville, Tennessee
Just go big
 

Attachments

  • Earth.jpg
    Earth.jpg
    62.3 KB · Views: 370

Grizzly Johnson

Active Member
Joined
Oct 7, 2008
Messages
16,076
Location
Tennessee
I would go with the dozer.... proper maintaining and it will last you a long time.

As far as the skid steer goes, from personal experience at work..... if you have anything other than flat ground..... you will become efficient at putting the tracks back on or get tired of doing it and sell it. It doesn't take much on uneven or rocky ground, even turning on big enough stobbs can jump the tracks off. I have a system that I use and can get a track back on in 5-10 minutes depending on how far off it is.... If it's bad and all the way off, you have to jack up the machine, remove the cover and open the valve to let out the grease that adjusts the tension of the tracks. Then get the track back on and then put a tube of grease back in to tighten the track back up. It's a PITA and could take 30 minutes or so depending on how prepared you are for the instance.

Each machine has it's place in work environments.
 

FTG-05

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2013
Messages
2,229
Location
TN
Grizzly Johnson":3t3yk2ix said:
I would go with the dozer.... proper maintaining and it will last you a long time.

As far as the skid steer goes, from personal experience at work..... if you have anything other than flat ground..... you will become efficient at putting the tracks back on or get tired of doing it and sell it. It doesn't take much on uneven or rocky ground, even turning on big enough stobbs can jump the tracks off. I have a system that I use and can get a track back on in 5-10 minutes depending on how far off it is.... If it's bad and all the way off, you have to jack up the machine, remove the cover and open the valve to let out the grease that adjusts the tension of the tracks. Then get the track back on and then put a tube of grease back in to tighten the track back up. It's a PITA and could take 30 minutes or so depending on how prepared you are for the instance.

Each machine has it's place in work environments.

I've helped put three tracks back on two different skid steers. Holy Mother Forking was that a massive PITA. Think trying to push a 500 lb wet noodle. :bash:
 

Latest posts

Top