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Have the DA liberals thought this through completely? Battery powered vehicle charging requirements...

rtaylor

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Oct 27, 2011
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716
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tennessee
I'm going to say they have thought it through and don't care about the details. They will do just like Obamacare and pardon themselves from being subject to such ridiculous foolishness. These bills are just for us peasants.
 

Bone Collector

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Sep 9, 2009
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17,396
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Murfreesboro, TN
Without doing a lot of research and crunching a lot of numbers, I can't help but imagine that with all electric vehicles on the road, the electricity demand on our power grid would at minimum double. How can we supply twice what is currently supplied all the while going to green energy. No sunshine no solar electricity. No wind no windmill electricity.
by burning fossil fuels..... 😂
 

eddie c

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Aug 9, 2001
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9,499
Location
jackson, tn
I didn't read every post but one caught my eye. Talking about upgrading the home electric service, the utility company will have to increase the wire/cable size to handle the current increase, which in turn will need more petroleum to made the wire insulation, etc.
 

woodswise

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Joined
Feb 11, 2007
Messages
279
Location
Goodlettsville
Just sitting here and wondered, how long would it take to charge a Tesla?

Sooooo, I duckduckgo'ed it.

  • Home Charging – Fully charging at a residential home where power output is low usually takes overnight from an empty battery to a full charge (or a couple hours if you’re just topping-off from a daily commute). Most people just plug in when they get home.
  • Charging at Superchargers – Charging at a Tesla Supercharger while on the road usually takes anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour, or sometimes a little more depending on the charger and the vehicle.
  • Charging at Public Chargers – Public chargers have widely varying power rates which can be as slow as a home charger or as fast as a Tesla Supercharger. Check the power rate of the public charger to get a sense of the charging time and see the tips in this article.
So, it appears the best case scenario is 30-45 minutes. Can you imagine, sitting at a RaceTrac for 30-45 minutes, OR LONGER, charging your electric car or truck?
How much are we going to have to spend to upgrade our electric service? From the article linked below regarding Tesla vehicles, you would need a 90 amp 240 volt circuit, which in my case, would require adding, at a minimum, a 125 amp sub panel. I would have to calculate how this would affect my main service entrance conductor and breaker size, which is currently 200 amp. Just shooting from the hip, I might have to upgrade this also. If I was pulling 90 amps charging my greenie vehicle, while at the same time the water heater and both AC units kick on I might be popping that 200 amp main breaker.

Also, how much money is RaceTrac going to invest to install all of these chargers? They are also going to have to have gasoline for x amount of years until fossil fuels are history.

How about the electrical grid upgrade requirements to supply all of the RaceTrac locations (and thousands of other vendors)? How much is this going to cost tax payers?

How is the power going to be generated to charge all of these vehicle? Wind? Solar? Nuclear? Fossil Fuels?

Have we really thought this through completely? I see lots of electric road rage happening in our future. I hate pulling over for 10 minutes to get gas, let alone 1 hour best case scenario to charge my Biden mobile. I drive pickup trucks and SUV's, which would require much larger batteries than a light weight Tesla sportscar. Which means longer charging times and power requirements.

The State of Tennessee is about to announce a new infrastructure plan to install chargers on every major interstate in Tennessee every 5 miles.... and guess who gets to pay for that electric vehicle or not?
 

Crosshairy

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Aug 22, 2006
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3,455
Location
Bartlett, TN
????
Maybe 25% jet fuel and 20% Diesel?
Maybe a little-known fact, but jet fuel and diesel are often co-mingled. The overlap in the two cuts is pretty large. As such, excess jet fuel is often dropped into the diesel, and the cuts between the two are manipulated depending on market forces. A 5-10% swing between the two is nothing, and we move the number around that much pretty often depending on the demand. Sometimes the number you gave might be more common, but plenty of times we are maximizing diesel production so some of the kero is blended into it.
 

FLTENNHUNTER1

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Nov 21, 2007
Messages
23,361
Location
SE Tennessee
My thing is once the batteries wont charge anymore then what. Landfill, leaks, they will be worse for the planet the gas.
And to add to your thoughts, how about the lead up to the failure? I'm making an semi-educated guess, but I think the battery would gradually lose its capability to hold a charge, meaning instead of giving you a range of 300 miles when the car/battery was new, it might only give you 200 then eventually only 100 miles per charge.
 

Cull Buck Hunter

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Joined
Dec 16, 2005
Messages
2,113
Location
Cleveland,TN
All those chargers will increase the burden on the grid and require massive upgrades to the distribution lines, transformers and facilities to increase capacity, I work for a local Utility and upgrades end up going back to the customer base even when it's a non profit provider, simple math.
 

Spurhunter

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Jun 9, 2008
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8,012
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Munford, TN
Of course it doesnt make a lot of sense, buying a car for $50,000 in order to 'save money' on fuel, haha.
My Tundra gets 15-16 MPG. I've done the math on buying a small car to save on gas. When you figure vehicle cost, insurance, tags, and maintenance, the second vehicle would have to get a whole lot of MPGs to save you any money. At least that was the case under President Trump. Under Joe and the Ho it will be different if they get their way and gas hits $5 a gallon. Plus I hate driving small cars and love my truck.
 

Stu

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Aug 31, 2017
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1,303
Location
Nashville area
And to add to your thoughts, how about the lead up to the failure? I'm making an semi-educated guess, but I think the battery would gradually lose its capability to hold a charge, meaning instead of giving you a range of 300 miles when the car/battery was new, it might only give you 200 then eventually only 100 miles per charge.
This is correct. My buddy boufht a nissan leaf used and it does not charge to 100%
 

FLTENNHUNTER1

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Joined
Nov 21, 2007
Messages
23,361
Location
SE Tennessee

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