Federal fire sticks

waynesworld

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Why wouldn't these be legal for ML the primer is separate the powder and the round is pushed through the barrel? I have not looked at the definiations of ML but i have used the powder that are pellets and a primer. Of course i am not a big ML person.
 

CHRIS WILSON

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waynesworld":1tkg623w said:
Why wouldn't these be legal for ML the primer is separate the powder and the round is pushed through the barrel? I have not looked at the definiations of ML but i have used the powder that are pellets and a primer. Of course i am not a big ML person.
Tennessee regs define a muzzle loader as "those firearms which are incapable of being loaded from the breech." The issue with Traditions new NitroFire and the Federal FireSticks is that though the bullet is loaded from the muzzle, the fire stick propellant is a self-contained powder charge cartridge that is loaded from the breech. By definition, the powder charge being loaded from the breech doesn't fit with what Tennessee defines as a muzzleloader. With that being said, I don't believe the TWRA has released an official statement on the Traditions NitroFire and Federal Firesticks that I'm aware of yet. Someone please correct me if I'm wrong.
 

waynesworld

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That makes sense thanks, i guess that is why some states are making tweaks to the laws. I would personally like to see this leagle as it could prevent some accidents that some people like me make. Like did i put one or two pellets in? or measuring by hand when you shake like me :)
 

Wobblyshot1

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Here's one with a traditional twist. I would love to have this flintlock rifle to hunt deer with. I could but not during Tennessee's ML season...it's a Ferguson rifle and it's a breech loader....illegal by definition according to the regulations.
 

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CHRIS WILSON

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Wobblyshot1":rn52nlfz said:
Here's one with a traditional twist. I would love to have this flintlock rifle to hunt deer with. I could but not during Tennessee's ML season...it's a Ferguson rifle and it's a breech loader....illegal by definition according to the regulations.

That's a very nice rifle and a historic design. Though illegal by definition, I'd be surprised if a TWRA officer would ticket you for using that....but then again, it may depend on the how uptight the officer is. My bet is the majority wouldn't even have the knowledge base to recognize it as a breech loader.
 

BullDawg Bill

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These are now legal, the definition has changed:

7. Muzzleloading firearms are defined as those firearms in which a projectile (rifle) or projectiles (shotgun) must be loaded from the muzzle (front) end of the barrel and the firearm being of design and manufacture that prevents the projectile(s) from being loaded from the breech (rear) end.
 

Carlos

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These are now legal, the definition has changed:

7. Muzzleloading firearms are defined as those firearms in which a projectile (rifle) or projectiles (shotgun) must be loaded from the muzzle (front) end of the barrel and the firearm being of design and manufacture that prevents the projectile(s) from being loaded from the breech (rear) end.
Right. They're now legal, although I saw several guys hunting with them last year on public land.
Seems like they might give some advantage, with the sealed load and all.
 

Carlos

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The best price I can find on one of their Nitrofire rifles is $550-$600.

I'd need to hear some valued feedback before I dropped that much on a rifle that I'd only carry 1 week of the season. (My CVA does pretty well with the BH209.)
 

CHRIS WILSON

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These are now legal, the definition has changed:

7. Muzzleloading firearms are defined as those firearms in which a projectile (rifle) or projectiles (shotgun) must be loaded from the muzzle (front) end of the barrel and the firearm being of design and manufacture that prevents the projectile(s) from being loaded from the breech (rear) end.
I was wondering how long it would take for the TWRA to bow to pressure and change the wording/definition to make them officially legal.
 

BullDawg Bill

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Right. They're now legal, although I saw several guys hunting with them last year on public land.
Seems like they might give some advantage, with the sealed load and all.
Looking forward to finding out this fall. I've never hunted muzzleloader season before because I wasn't confident enough in my ability to drop a deer in his tracks with a neck shot - I'm physically handicapped and tracking is difficult for me (but I've done and always will if I wound an animal). This seems to be more consistent from shot to shot.
 

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