Blacktop drive question

Kimber45

Kimber45

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So, when our builder had the driveway poured I was clueless that I needed to see that it be poured 4+ inches thick vs 2.. Our lot, entire area, holds a ridiculously large amount of moisture 8-9 months out of the year. Driveway is cracking and starting to sag in lots of places. My initial thought was to take a sledgehammer to the sagging areas, back fill them with something and then have 2 more inches of blacktop put over existing ... This one has lasted 11 yrs before really showing issues.

Thoughts?
 
280longshot

280longshot

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My driveway is about 15 yrs old and has several cracks but in pretty good condition overall. Thinking about getting it repaved and having a bigger turn around.
Im guessing they can just pave over the existing driveway without much repair.
Im not sure what they would do to yours.

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Jcalder

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No way I'd let them pave over a cracked driveway, especially if its spider webbed. You'd be a lot better off cutting out the problem spots. If it's cracked it'll crack on the top coat. If it's spiderwebbed it's essentially going to pieces and won't be cured with a coat


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Big Ben

Big Ben

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Mine is 4 inches thick and still have a few cracks where tree's are close. I was told it was due to the roots. Ours is about 13 years old and only been patched and coated once about 5 years ago.
 
280longshot

280longshot

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Jcalder":1rczipw9 said:
No way I'd let them pave over a cracked driveway, especially if its spider webbed. You'd be a lot better off cutting out the problem spots. If it's cracked it'll crack on the top coat. If it's spiderwebbed it's essentially going to pieces and won't be cured with a coat


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Whats the best way to repair cracks if i was to have it repaved.

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Jcalder

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Cut them out and rebed it with crusher run. Make sure the crusher run is packed. I would leave my cutout places a bit deeper and have it filled with asphalt if it was mine. If it's a single crack I think there's some tar type adhesives at lowes. It'll probably crack there again. The spiderwebs would concern me more. Not sure how bad it is but if it's terrible you may be better off starting over. Base is key on asphalt and concrete. Some point I'll have to redo my driveways. I'll either pour them or dig them out completely


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Kimber45

Kimber45

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Jcalder":1g687vh5 said:
Cut them out and rebed it with crusher run. Make sure the crusher run is packed. I would leave my cutout places a bit deeper and have it filled with asphalt if it was mine. If it's a single crack I think there's some tar type adhesives at lowes. It'll probably crack there again. The spiderwebs would concern me more. Not sure how bad it is but if it's terrible you may be better off starting over. Base is key on asphalt and concrete. Some point I'll have to redo my driveways. I'll either pour them or dig them out completely


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To “maybe” avoid this again 10 yrs down the road, would putting in french drains down each side out to the ditch possibly help with diverting a lot of the moisture?
 
Kimber45

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I’ve had mine resealed twice.. With all the water this ground holds, it’s pretty miraculous that it lasted this long.
 
Jcalder

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Kimber45":rqhmi2bk said:
Jcalder":rqhmi2bk said:
Cut them out and rebed it with crusher run. Make sure the crusher run is packed. I would leave my cutout places a bit deeper and have it filled with asphalt if it was mine. If it's a single crack I think there's some tar type adhesives at lowes. It'll probably crack there again. The spiderwebs would concern me more. Not sure how bad it is but if it's terrible you may be better off starting over. Base is key on asphalt and concrete. Some point I'll have to redo my driveways. I'll either pour them or dig them out completely


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To “maybe” avoid this again 10 yrs down the road, would putting in french drains down each side out to the ditch possibly help with diverting a lot of the moisture?
if you have a low spot that generally holds water I would. If it doesn't hold water I wouldn't fool with it. Biggest issue is you don't want it sitting on a wet spot


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L

leader

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Asphalt or concrete cheaper?


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double browtine

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So for starters, asphalt is totally different than concrete. In pavement design, you start by determining the load bearing of your soil. Then you design the sub base, then finally the surface course. Concrete will support a lot more than asphalt.
In your case, with soil that holds alot of water, you will need a larger stone in your base to allow the water to escape or drain from under the driving surface. The alligator cracking on the surface allows water to soak through the asphalt into the subsurface layers of stone and soil. The freezing and thawing of the trapped water causes the sub base to fail. This is what causes pot holes on roads.
Without seeing your situation, it would be hard to suggest a solution. However, if I were building a new driveway, I would remove all the topsoil, compact the soil, clay is best, then put down a couple inches of 1-1/4" to 2" stone, followed by 2 inches of 3/8-3/4" stone, followed by your pavement. And make sure it has enough slope to drain, so your driveway doesn't pond water on the surface.
 
fritoman

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It will crack where you have a crack if you don't tear it out when you lay more. I worked on asphalt crew in high school and my dad has owned an asphalt sealing business for 20 years.

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Kimber45

Kimber45

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double browtine":2g3glyjy said:
And for a quick fix, I think quickcrete makes a concrete mix that is asphalt colored.

I'll have to look into that.. It has really started to spider web on me this year, but the 2 low spots have probably sunk 1 - 1.5" x 18" wide and are 6-8' in length. I walked on one low spot today and watched water ooze out..

It's inevitable it has to be torn out by what I'm hearing here, but if I can patch it for now it buys me a little time to maybe put together a lot of what I need without breaking the bank. The driveway is 20' wide by (way more than I wish it were) probably at least 135'.. and with a 20'x20' turnaround. I will go back with something like a 20'x40' on the turnaround as parking is often an issue plus I'll go 21' in width as the boys park on the right side with crew cab trucks. Normally there is one vehicle in the 2 car garage and 4 parked in the driveway. We do have a good concrete pad leading up to the garage so one gets parked to the right side of that pad, while 3 live on the blacktop. The youngest drives like his mother :D so he has contributed to destroying the edge of the driveway turning too sharp and rolling the outside edge to a point that it has 1000 cracks in it there lol..
 
Jcalder

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The problem is driveways aren't bedded properly. And they generally don't have a consistent depth. That's where they'll save money and get the homeowner. Same with concrete. If I was paying to have the work done I'd be watching them.
Db is correct on getting some bigger rock under the road bed. That gives the water a place to go. Most contractors don't do that. It can get expensive but it doesn't have to be bedded like a road either. The only thing I would change with what db said is capping the gravel with crusher run. You could hold your the edge back on top of your bigger rock to let the water in. French drain it out


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RUGER

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Just go with concrete, then you will KNOW it is gonna crack. :)
 
M

Mike Belt

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My asphalted driveway is cracking everywhere because of the trees I have everywhere. The roots grow under the driveway and push upwards.
 

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