ADVICE Please (water damage)

bigasports

bigasports

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Oct 25, 2008
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Spring Hill
I came home last night to water pouring out of my garage. Once I get inside the actual house I find a inch to inch and a half of water covering the whole down stairs. Water hose from under the kitchen sink had a mishap of sorts per the plumber. Plumber fixed the hose in a matter of minutes and didn't charge me a dime. He said he felt bad about the water I was dealing with all covering my floors. (Royal Flush Plumbing) Spring Hill, TN

Insurance sent out a water damage emergency restoration crew. They soaked, vacuumed, and put fans out. Talking with them gave me the feeling that they were gonna dry everything and it would all be fine. I have no experience with this but I find that hard to believe based on my floors being covered (hardwood, carpet, ceramic tile) I thought for sure that the carpet, the pad and the wood floors would be pulled up along with some of the base boards and dry wall. I called another guy to come in and give me a second opinion so I'm waiting on him now.

Bottom line is I feel the first crew who was contacted by my insurance company is in kahoots with them and is trying to just help the insurance not pay me out. Anyone go through this? Thoughts? Advice?
My cell# 615-473-710FOUR
 
Snowwolfe

Snowwolfe

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Just have to wait and see what happens. The Insurance most likely will not pay for something that "might" go bad. Keep an eye on the floor for signs of fading, warping, and mold.
 
Kimber45

Kimber45

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If they did the big heaters, dehumidifiers, fans etc you won’t have much damage, if placed correctly. They need to run them under in the crawl space and above in the living area. Been there, done that, no fun at all. Sorry bud
 
Grandslam11

Grandslam11

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If there is more damage, the insurance company should pay even after the fact. Just keep an eye on it. Those commercial heaters and dehumidifiers are the real deal and do an incredible job. I would be more worried with the hardwood buckling than anything. Also keep in mind, if any furniture or anything was damaged in the process, that is claimable as well.
 
rem270

rem270

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Don't have any advice to give you but hate it happened and hope you get it fixed RIGHT whichever way it has to go.

That's my biggest fear me being back home and something happening like that. Usually we're gone a minimum of 3 days and a lot can happen in that time frame.
 
T

TNLynn

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baxter TN
I live near Cookeville and have farm bureau insurance. When I had a water line burst, insurance guy said my house was unliveable, paid me $1500 per month NOT to live in my house, replaced EVERYTHING water touched. Nearly 3 months out of my house. New hardwood floors, new carpet in bedrooms, new subfloors , new duct work. I was VERY satisfied with Farm Bureau.
 
DaveB

DaveB

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When leaving the house for more than a day turn the water off. I timed it, 30 seconds lift the cover, turn the valve--- instead of | and replace the cover.
 
WTM

WTM

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came home from vacation one year to find the city sewer dept blowing sewage into my basement. glad i sold that house.

good luck on the drying out. i have a feeling the wood floors are gonna curl on you, but you may get lucky. if its laminate its prolly toast.
 
WTM

WTM

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TNLynn":1ef4woyt said:
I live near Cookeville and have farm bureau insurance. When I had a water line burst, insurance guy said my house was unliveable, paid me $1500 per month NOT to live in my house, replaced EVERYTHING water touched. Nearly 3 months out of my house. New hardwood floors, new carpet in bedrooms, new subfloors , new duct work. I was VERY satisfied with Farm Bureau.

+1 had 2 water damage claims and a $30k claim from a tree falling during a storm. good service.
 
R

ronnycl

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They have 72 hours to dry the structure before mold begins. With proper equipment fans and dehumidifiers they can dry most everything. After the structure is dry the may pull wood floors if necessary. Alot of factors here type of wood etc...nail down or glue down, carpert and pad can be dried without pulling tile as well, they may pull the wood at the end of the day but do not expect the tile or carpet to come out with a clean water loss. Give them the 72 hours and do not turn off their equipment. Run your house heater up to 90. Heat dries! Get a hotel for the 3 days and let them have it
 
dralarms

dralarms

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If it's not "soaked up" and swelled it's more than likely fine. I had a leak here and didn't catch it for months (in the wall and seeping into the floor" and it cost 16000.00+ to fix it. The water restoration people have meters to measure the amount of moisture in the woods and once dry they can tell if it's going to do anything.
 
W

wjohnson1983

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North AL
Had a similar situation a few yeas ago. When this subdivision was built they put all the water heaters in the attic for some reason. Anyways a line froze and popped. When temps rose later in the day while at work, the attic flooded and then the ceiling caved in from the weight of wet the insulation. They brought all those things to dry the house out like you said, but most of it that sat in water needs to be replaced.

For us it was all trim, 2 ft up of sheetrock was the standard, painting of all those rooms, and hardwood floors. They pulled the carpet/padding up while drying and restretched. Then steam cleaned it. Didn't have to fight insurance/adjustor for any of that.

Had to get the adjustor back out a second time and really fight them for new cabinets and countertops though in the kitchen. They deemed the house unlivable, but we had to document proof of water/utility/mileage/extra food costs/etc. to get a monthly stipend. That went ok for 2-3 months and then they wouldn't pay anymore because we "should" have been back in the house. So we had to fight to get more months because it was their fault for not sending the adjustor and wanting to argue over things that were water damaged.

Appliances were tested, but nothing found to be broken. We had to get a furniture repair specialist to give us a quote on repairing vs. totaling furniture.

All State
 
P

prstide

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Real wood floors should be fine and can be completely dried in place. The carpet pad should probably be pulled and the carpet itself can be dried then pad replaced. Pull the toe kick on kitchen cabinets and dry beneath. Tile will be fine. The good thing is it was clean water. I'm assuming your house is on a slab?
 
P

prstide

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wjohnson1983":2taz9250 said:
Had a similar situation a few yeas ago. When this subdivision was built they put all the water heaters in the attic for some reason. Anyways a line froze and popped. When temps rose later in the day while at work, the attic flooded and then the ceiling caved in from the weight of wet the insulation. They brought all those things to dry the house out like you said, but most of it that sat in water needs to be replaced.

For us it was all trim, 2 ft up of sheetrock was the standard, painting of all those rooms, and hardwood floors. They pulled the carpet/padding up while drying and restretched. Then steam cleaned it. Didn't have to fight insurance/adjustor for any of that.

Had to get the adjustor back out a second time and really fight them for new cabinets and countertops though in the kitchen. They deemed the house unlivable, but we had to document proof of water/utility/mileage/extra food costs/etc. to get a monthly stipend. That went ok for 2-3 months and then they wouldn't pay anymore because we "should" have been back in the house. So we had to fight to get more months because it was their fault for not sending the adjustor and wanting to argue over things that were water damaged.

Appliances were tested, but nothing found to be broken. We had to get a furniture repair specialist to give us a quote on repairing vs. totaling furniture.

All State

Your scenario is different because the water came from above and is considered Class III.
 
TNRifleman

TNRifleman

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I worked in this industry for years at the corporate office of one of the national restoration companies. If it was truly clean water, and they were able to extract most of the water before it sat too long, drying it without a bunch of demolition is possible. They need to set the proper amount of air movers and dehus to dry it out efficiently so secondary damage doesn't occur. I would watch the wood floors really closely. Are they using any drying mats on the wood floors? Also, ask them what category and class they determined this to be. If they say it is a Cat 2 or 3, they likely should not be drying in place. Category of water defines the level of contaminant in the water. Class of water basically defines how much water/absorption has occurred. A class 2 or 3 is much more absorption than class 1.

From the sounds of the direction they are headed with the dry out process, I would expect them to have classified this as a Cat 1, class 1 or cat 1, class 2 at worst.

All different material types will have a dry standard (basically % of moisture content at normal conditions) that needs to be reached. If the can reach dry standard on sheetrock, floors, subfloors, etc, without doing much tear out, that is what the insurance company will be looking for. I am surprised they did not disengage the carpet and pull the pad as it helps the drying process and is cheap to replace, however, some insurance companies really push "in-place" drying these days.

Sorry you are going through this, it sucks for sure.
 
1bow4me

1bow4me

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west Tn.
If you have hardwood flooring, it will buckle. Felt with it before with insurance company. They said it wouldn't have any effect on it and a month later it was warping. Called ins. company and they balked at fixing it. Basically told them that's fine. The next call will be from my lawyer. They had an adjuster there the next day and all my floor was replaced. When they pulled up the old flooring, there was moisture and water everywhere. They can't "Dry it out". If moisture gets under the flooring, it Will damage it. Carpet will mold and rot, linoleum will bubble up, and hardwood will warp. Tile will come loose. Jmo and from experience.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G890A using Tapatalk
 
M

mike243

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Sep 6, 2006
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16,751
Location
east tn
Hate that it happened but please ck the water pressure,I go behind plumbers that fix 1 thing then some thing else pops,no more than 75lbs as that's the limit of most regulators and if its over you cant adjust it back down and it stay,most hoses don't just break with out a reason,if a gas water heater is in use a expansion tank is needed most of the time these days,use to the incoming pressure wasn't real high and it could back into the main water system but not any more with ck valves to stop that,putting a gauge with a tattle tail needle on it for 24 hrs will tell you whats going on
 
F

fishboy1

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Jan 13, 2003
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Location
Warren Co
Remember that the purpose of insurance is to make you Whole - deductible. That means to put you back the way you were before the incident - the deductible.

So be slow to accept a settlement. IF you are not satisfied with the restoration, don't accept the adjusters offer.
Laminate is probably toast.
Hardwood might be ok, but it depends on the subfloor. If you have a particle board subfloors and the water soaked through the hardwoods, it WILL be damaged. If the hardwoods are well sealed, it might have kept the water from getting underneath and degrading the subfloor.
Hate that you are going through this. Hope they fix everything up right.
 

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