I know that several people on here have tried Biologic's Winter Bulbs and Sugar Beets and have all had mixed results. Well I decided to use the mix mainly because of the sugar beets that were in the mix.

I must say that I was very impressed with the sugar beet portion of the mix. I planted the complete biologic mix along with some wheat and clover. I had a serious bug problem that took out many of the turnip tops, but the beets were un-harmed and the deer began to browse on them from bow season until they were gone. They produce a lush green leaf that it not too spicy or bitter even before a frost. I actually would pick some every time I checked the plot to taste it.

Next year I will probably plant only the sugar beets and take a year ot two off from the turnips. There has been some legal issues with the seed production, but I have heard that a round-up ready variety may be available on the market soon. This would allow people to plant earlier in the summer so that the sugar beets could actually produce a bulb. I dont really care about the bulb because I really liked the production of the greens and this could be a good alternative to the common turnip greens.

Here is the plot in early September.




Here it is after the bugs wiped out the turnip greens. You can see that the only greens left are the beets. They werent harmed by the bugs.



Here is some early season browse on the beet greens.



And here is what is left of the plot as of last weekend. The only visible beets or turnip greens for that matter is right on side the box stand. The box stand kind of served as an exclusion cage since the deer dont like to get to close.



It appears that they are very disease and pest resistant. It doesnt appear to be effected by the turnip beetle that destroyed most of the turnip greens. Some of the greens that are still by the box stand are almost 2ft tall with huge leaves. Unfortunately I forgot to get a picture of them.

Anyway, I just thought I would share this for anyone who is looking to plant some different varieties in their plots next year.