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#9975 - 07/23/06 08:14 PM longhunter re-enactors are you out there?
camocowboy
TnDeer Old Timer
4 Point


Registered: 12/07/99
Posts: 426
Loc: Livingston,Tn/Overton

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We are planning on re-enacting the ambush and death of Robert Crockett in Overton county at our celebration this september. He was Davy's brother and one of the original longhunters. If you have an outfit and like to to that sort of thing we need you! email bowmanjim@yahoo.com
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#9976 - 07/23/06 09:05 PM Re: longhunter re-enactors are you out there?
TN.Frank
8 Point


Registered: 12/24/05
Posts: 1608
Loc: Crossville, TN., U.S.A.

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Try posting on this Traditional site and I bet you'll have better luck.
http://www.muzzleloadingforum.com/fusionbb/fusionbb.php?

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#9977 - 07/23/06 10:07 PM Re: longhunter re-enactors are you out there?
TN.Frank
8 Point


Registered: 12/24/05
Posts: 1608
Loc: Crossville, TN., U.S.A.

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Here's another site where you might advertise for some reinactors.
http://www.historicaltrekking.com/

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#9978 - 07/24/06 02:33 PM Re: longhunter re-enactors are you out there?
TN.Frank
8 Point


Registered: 12/24/05
Posts: 1608
Loc: Crossville, TN., U.S.A.

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Well, any luck yet?
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#9979 - 07/24/06 03:21 PM Re: longhunter re-enactors are you out there?
camocowboy
TnDeer Old Timer
4 Point


Registered: 12/07/99
Posts: 426
Loc: Livingston,Tn/Overton

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You know Frank this is just another symptom of why Tennesseeans are just no fun anymore. We are called the volunteer state but no one wants to do anything that requires a little effort unless there is something to put in their pocket for them. Robert Crockett was as important to our state history as was his brother. He just never got the press. He was one of the original longhunters opening up tennessee for settlement and lost his life to the Indians. I want to see him remembered. Maybe if I had asked for some customers to buy drugs, I would have gotten a better response.There seems to be more users than re-enactors.
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#9980 - 07/24/06 03:58 PM Re: longhunter re-enactors are you out there?
TN.Frank
8 Point


Registered: 12/24/05
Posts: 1608
Loc: Crossville, TN., U.S.A.

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Yep, I feel ya' pard. That's why I'm pretty much a "Traditional Muzzle loading" kind of guy because they still have a sense of community, at least more so then many others. I'm sure if you post on the links you'll find some people to help ya' out. I've not done any thing even close to re-inacting unless you count the rendevou that I went to in the early 80's. Other then that I just tend to like the guns, not really into the clothes,LOL. Good luck, I'm sure someone will answer you if you post. ;\)
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#9981 - 07/25/06 02:24 PM Re: longhunter re-enactors are you out there?
Rancocas
4 Point


Registered: 11/29/05
Posts: 249
Loc: Ocoee Country/Cleveland

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You are a bit far away for me, about a 3 1/2 to 4 hour drive.

When is this celebration? and, when was Robert Crockett killed?

Not meaning any offense, but just to be contrite, as a "traditionalist" and a history buff, I must say that I don't consider either David or Robert Crockett to be "longhunters" They grew to manhood in the early 1800's, after the longhunter era had ended. Sure, they made long hunts of a month or two, but they were not "longhunters".

Mark A. Baker, as a historian, has said that the high point of the longhunter era was probably the single decade of the 1760's. The entire era might extend from the 1750's until about the 1770's. In those times very, very few white men lived west of the Appalachians.

The "longhunters" were mainly white men who had homes east of the Appalachians, and who crossed the mountains to hunt for a year, or more, mostly in the Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee country. Daniel Boone was a longhunter early in his career. At that time he lived in the Yadkin Valley of North Carolina. On one long hunt he was away from home for about 3 years!

The Crocketts were farmer/hunters whose families were settled either in the mountains, or west of them. David Crockett's grandfather was killed by the Cherokees in 1777 in what is now east Tennessee. He might have been a longhunter, but he was a farmer at the time he was killed.

David and Robert lived during the heyday of the "mountainman era", although they did not take part in that great adventure. When Davy was killed at the Alamo, men such as Kit Carson and Jim Bridger were roaming the far west.

Maybe the meaning of "longhunter" is only a matter of semantics. However, I think it is the little things such as this that set a real "traditional muzzleloader" and "living historian" apart from all the others who also choose to carry muzzleloaders.
_________________________
Know what you believe in, fight for your beliefs, and never, never ever, compromise away your rights!

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#9982 - 07/25/06 02:33 PM Re: longhunter re-enactors are you out there?
TN.Frank
8 Point


Registered: 12/24/05
Posts: 1608
Loc: Crossville, TN., U.S.A.

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Yep, you got it right. The "Longhunter" period was well over by the time that Davy Crockett came along. What would have been called a "Longhunter" became the Mt.Men, who carried on the tradition by venturing out into the west for a year at a time in order to gather beaver pelts and other furs.
Personally, that was my favorite time period in history but as I get older I tend to drift further back into history to the point that now the Revolutionary War period is my favorite. Guess the older I get the further back I go. LOL. \:D

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#9983 - 07/25/06 05:26 PM Re: longhunter re-enactors are you out there?
camocowboy
TnDeer Old Timer
4 Point


Registered: 12/07/99
Posts: 426
Loc: Livingston,Tn/Overton

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By Dallas Bogan

Reprinted with Permission from Dallas Bogan. This article was published in the LaFollette Press.
I am so intrigued with the longhunters that at this time I will compile a story concerning them. I have before mentioned them in articles, but at this time I will go into some detail regarding them.

One might say that the longhunters were the first authentic genuine American Frontiersmen to pass beyond the Blue Ridge Mountains. The majority of longhunters were simple, plain, poor men in search of relief from debt, land, and a way to feed their families. Civilizing the west, as the area of Tennessee was called in early colonial times, was not their goal. They just yearned to make money by hunting and selling their deer skins and furs. A longhunter, ruling out any misfortune, could earn more than $1000 a year, quite a sum for the day.

Among the early longhunters in Campbell County were Curtis Alderson, John Alderson, Joseph Carroll, Obediah Garwood, John Herd, Walter Kelley, Archibald Taylor, Phillip Cooper, John Strutler and Uriah Stone. Some historians claim that Daniel and Squire Boone made at least one hunting trip into Campbell County.

Shortly after the French and Indian War, in the middle 1700's, the land west of the Appalachian Mountains was open for hunting and settling. The adventurers involved were comprised mainly of the English, Irish and German immigrants. They lived on the edge of Indian country and were the ones who had the skills of traveling into the wilderness and survive. Virginia, Pennsylvania and North Carolina were the primary states to send the longhunters into the backwoods.

The long hunt would start just after the fall harvest and could possibly last as long as a year, or until the hunters returned with there hides and furs.

The Middle Tennessee region was set up as a 'station camp' by the longhunters, reasoning being that the main supply area was located here. This region was centralized for the benefit of the longhunters simply so they could prepare their hides and furs, and spend time relaxing before they would go back for the hunt. A head count would find as many as 30 men in a hunting party, each pairing up to hunt in all directions from the station camp.

And now for the adventuresome side of the longhunters. The following is condensed from Ramsey's "Annals of Tennessee."

On June 2, 1769, a large company of longhunters was created for the purpose of hunting and exploring in what is now Middle Tennessee. Certainly this area, as well as all of Tennessee, was discovered and settled by these adventurers who became the first explorers.

The company consisted of more than twenty men, some from North Carolina, others from the area of Natural Bridge (Rockbridge County, Va.), and several from the newly formed settlement near Inglis' Ferry in Virginia. The place of gathering was below Fort Chisel on New River. The names of some of these men are: John Rains, Kasper Mansker, Abraham Bledsoe, John Baker, Joseph Drake, Obadiah Terrill, Uriah Stone, Henry Smith, Ned Cowan, and Robert Crockett.

They traveled by the head of the Holston, crossing the North Fork, and on to Clinch and Powell's Rivers. They then passed through Cumberland Gap and discovered the southern part of Kentucky. Here they set up camp at a place since called Price's Meadow, located in present Wayne County. At this point they agreed to deposit their game and skins.

The hunters were separated to a degree, the whole company still traveling to the southwest. They arrived at Roaring River and the Cany Fork at a point far above the mouth, somewhere near the foot of the mountain.

Robert Crockett was killed near the headwaters of Roaring River when returning to camp. About seven or eight Indians were traveling to the north, where in ambush, firing upon and killing him. Crockett's body was discovered on the war track leading from the Cherokee Nation towards the Shawnee tribe.

The immediate country was covered with high grass with no traces of human settlement to be seen. The surroundings also included dry caves and creek banks where stones were set up that covered large numbers of human bones.

The hunt continued for eight or nine months, when part of them returned in April 1770.

Findlay and Boone, along with the explorers, returned to the banks of the Yadkin where they related their many stories to the settlement. Their friends and neighbors were captivated by the glowing description of the land beyond. The pioneer folks, with their imaginations abounding, were enthused with the visions of the fertile valleys beyond the mountains. The Atlantic country, in which they lived, with its hills and rocky uplands, seemed a great distance from their mental picture of the newly discovered lands.

With the news of the newly found land, the settlements of New River, Holston, and Clinch launched a company of about forty strapping hunters for the purpose of hunting and trapping west of the Cumberland Mountains. They, without delay, set out equipped with their rifles, traps, dogs, and blankets. Their traveling apparel included their hunting shirts, leggins, and moccasins.

Hastily, they commenced their grueling enterprise in the real spirit of adventure through the rough forest and rugged hills. The expedition was led by Col. James Knox, the names of the adventurers being unknown.

The Colonel and nine others penetrated to the lower Cumberland, there making an extensive and irregular search, thus adding much to their knowledge of the country. After a long absence, the party returned home. These hearty souls were known as "The Longhunters."

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#9984 - 07/25/06 08:07 PM Re: longhunter re-enactors are you out there?
camocowboy
TnDeer Old Timer
4 Point


Registered: 12/07/99
Posts: 426
Loc: Livingston,Tn/Overton

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After digging through history all afternoon I believe you could be right! The sign in the county that tells about Robert Crockett calls him Davy's brother. Every generation had a Robert. But... he also had an uncle who fought in the battle of Kings mountain who may have been our county hero. What do you think? By the way, in the history of Sgt. Alvin C York, his father is also called a longhunter who came into Fentress county.
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#9985 - 07/26/06 06:41 AM Re: longhunter re-enactors are you out there?
Rancocas
4 Point


Registered: 11/29/05
Posts: 249
Loc: Ocoee Country/Cleveland

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Uh huh. That Robert Crockett of 1769 would have been old enough to be Davy's grandfather. And, yes, this fits with the time period of the longhunters.

BTW; I once knew a guy named David Crockett. He was from Vermont.

Alvin C. York's father would have lived during the 1800's - far too late to be a longhunter. However, I did hear once that one of York's ancestors was a longhunter and was the first white man accredited to enter the Valley of the Three Forks of the Wolf, in what is now Fentress County. Supposedly, he lived under a rock shelter there while he hunted the valley.
I have spent some time in Fentress County, and have seen the rock shelter, as well as toured Alvin York's home.
_________________________
Know what you believe in, fight for your beliefs, and never, never ever, compromise away your rights!

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#9986 - 07/26/06 09:21 AM Re: longhunter re-enactors are you out there?
Rancocas
4 Point


Registered: 11/29/05
Posts: 249
Loc: Ocoee Country/Cleveland

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The Battle of King's Mountain took place in October of 1780 - too late for your Robert Crockett who was killed in 1769 or '70.

I think this is fascinating stuff. This is some of the kinds of topics that I enjoy on muzzleloading sites.
I don't read anything that mentions inlines, pyrodex, sabots and such as that. I don't care about that stuff and don't want to hear about it. For me, with muzzleloading, if it didn't exist before the 1860's it don't exist now.
_________________________
Know what you believe in, fight for your beliefs, and never, never ever, compromise away your rights!

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#9987 - 07/26/06 10:46 AM Re: longhunter re-enactors are you out there?
camocowboy
TnDeer Old Timer
4 Point


Registered: 12/07/99
Posts: 426
Loc: Livingston,Tn/Overton

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Now I gotta find out just who Robert Crockett was!
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#9988 - 07/26/06 12:42 PM Re: longhunter re-enactors are you out there?
TN.Frank
8 Point


Registered: 12/24/05
Posts: 1608
Loc: Crossville, TN., U.S.A.

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 Quote:
Originally posted by Rancocas:

I don't read anything that mentions inlines, pyrodex, sabots and such as that. I don't care about that stuff and don't want to hear about it. For me, with muzzleloading, if it didn't exist before the 1860's it don't exist now.
WOW, we are SO much alike in this respect, kind of spooky. \:D
As was tradition "back in the day" most people named their kids after the father or grandfather and had kind of a "family first name" that got passed on from one generation to the next. I'd bet that you'll find a Robert in every generation of Crocketts same as a Davy. This is interesting stuff though. Good luck with the search. ;\)

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#9989 - 07/30/06 08:12 AM Re: longhunter re-enactors are you out there?
camocowboy
TnDeer Old Timer
4 Point


Registered: 12/07/99
Posts: 426
Loc: Livingston,Tn/Overton

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It's a shame but it looks like I may have to go to Ken-tuk-ee to get some guys willing to fill in for re-enactors of the VOLUNTEER state because so far there are no volunteers in Tennessee!
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#9990 - 07/30/06 10:55 AM Re: longhunter re-enactors are you out there?
Rancocas
4 Point


Registered: 11/29/05
Posts: 249
Loc: Ocoee Country/Cleveland

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Maybe these guys can help you out.
www.geocities.com/davycrockettlonghunters
_________________________
Know what you believe in, fight for your beliefs, and never, never ever, compromise away your rights!

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#9991 - 08/01/06 09:26 AM Re: longhunter re-enactors are you out there?
REBEL1972
Spike


Registered: 09/08/04
Posts: 63
Loc: BAXTER ,TN.

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Camo cowboy , are you still in the same place? I have been to your place a couple of times .Are you still having the fall shoots?
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#9992 - 08/01/06 10:42 AM Re: longhunter re-enactors are you out there?
camocowboy
TnDeer Old Timer
4 Point


Registered: 12/07/99
Posts: 426
Loc: Livingston,Tn/Overton

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Hello rebel! No we have not had a shoot in a while. I sure do miss them. We are planning a primitive squirril hunt the second weekend in
September in Standing Stone Park. If you would like a flyer please email your mailing address to me. It's going to be a hoot! sidelock,flinters and trad bows only. JB

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#385640 - 09/07/07 01:51 AM Re: longhunter re-enactors are you out there? [Re: camocowboy]
Locksley
16 Point


Registered: 10/23/01
Posts: 19734
Loc: Antioch TN

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Interesting read .
_________________________
To know wisdom and instruction; to perceive the words of understanding;"The greatest pain a man can suffer is to have knowledge of much, and power over nothing" - Herodotus

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#527659 - 12/13/07 04:08 PM Re: longhunter re-enactors are you out there? [Re: Rancocas]
Macdaddy3231
Button


Registered: 10/24/07
Posts: 4
Loc: Middle Tennessee

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Rancocas, are you familiar with Mark A. Baker?
_________________________
"Education, I fear, is learning to see one thing by going blind in another."
-Aldo Leopold

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#534673 - 12/20/07 02:55 AM Re: longhunter re-enactors are you out there? [Re: ]
Locksley
16 Point


Registered: 10/23/01
Posts: 19734
Loc: Antioch TN

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Interesting read . I used to do this back in the 1980's and threw the early 1990's and know several rifle makers I will pass this info on.
_________________________
To know wisdom and instruction; to perceive the words of understanding;"The greatest pain a man can suffer is to have knowledge of much, and power over nothing" - Herodotus

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#560987 - 01/12/08 07:12 PM Re: longhunter re-enactors are you out there? [Re: Locksley]
bohun10g
4 Point


Registered: 12/13/07
Posts: 245
Loc: Sparta,TN

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Nice history JB
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#565941 - 01/16/08 01:23 AM Re: longhunter re-enactors are you out there? [Re: bohun10g]
Locksley
16 Point


Registered: 10/23/01
Posts: 19734
Loc: Antioch TN

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A lot of people do not realize it, but Davy Crockett had a lot of relatives in Tennessee, including several first cousins by the name of David Crockett, which were named after Davy’s grandfather. I believe the story about when Davy was rejected by a Quaker girl was invented to explain the marriage license found in Jefferson Co., of his cousin, Davy Crockett- probable son of his uncle William, to Margaret Elder, (proved by Bible records). When Davy lived in Gibson Co., Tennessee, two other David Crocketts lived within 12 miles of him. One of these was referred to as David Crockett of Rutherford Co. by Goodspeed, and this was the cousin that married Margaret. They moved to Rutherford Co. with her father, David Elder, before moving to Gibson Co. The Elders and the Crocketts were probably moved together from Lancaster, Pa., to Frederick Co., Virginia, to Tyrone Co., NC, and then to Tennessee. The other David Crockett was David B. Crockett, son of Davy’s uncle Robert. David B. married Drucilla Elder, sister to Margaret Elder. Their grandmother was Anne Gordon, who lived on Greene Mountain, South Carolina, where Davy’s father, John and his uncles fought in the revolution in the Battle of Green Mountain.

David Crockett, the elder lived on Tuscarora Creek on North Mountain, Fredrick Co., Virginia, at least by 1748 as evidenced in a deed by Hugh Lyle. His neighbors included the John and Patrick Gillaspy, William Patterson, Robert Jackson, James Glenn (bought from Mordicai Mendenhall), Richard Beeson (Mordicai Mendenhall's father-in-law), James Brittain, and Robert Elder.

The earliest record found on David Crockett was dated January 8, 1743. David Crockett is called by some David, the elder, to distinguish him from his grandson, the famous Davy Crockett, who died in the Alamo in San Antonio, Texas in 1836. According to this deed, David Crockatt (Crockett) witnessed the sale of land between Morgan Bryan and his wife to Roger Turner in Frederick Co., Virginia. An interesting fact of this association of David Crockett and Morgan Bryan is that it links the families of two of America's greatest frontiersmen. Morgan Bryan's granddaughter, Rebecca, daughter of his son Joseph, married frontiersman Daniel Boone. Assuming David was at least 21 years of at the time of this transaction he would have been born around 1722 or earlier. Davy Crockett in his autobiography stated that his grandfather was born in Maryland or on the way over on a ship. During this time there were Crocketts in Lancaster, Pennsylvania where Davy said his father spent time in his youth. Some of David Crockett's neighbors may have also come from Lancaster as the Elders, Pattersons, Beesons who were mentioned in deeds with David Crockett were also names of families in Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. Modecai I. Mendenhall, who witnessed a deed with David Crockett, was born in Concord, Chester Co., Pennsylvania in about 1713. He married Charity Beeson on March 21, 1734/35 in Leacock, Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania, giving proof that some of these neighbors were indeed from Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. Modecai moved to Guilford, Guiford Co., NC, as many of these families later moved to North Carolina. Some of these families also moved to the Holston River Valley of Tennessee in what became Sullivan Co., where the Crocketts later moved. One such person that moved from Frederick to the Holston River Valley and then to Clarkesville, Tennessee was Valentine Sevier, whose brother was General John Sevier.

Records show that David Crockett was added to the tythe list in 1748, and he married Elizabeth, whose last name is not known, at about this time. There has been speculation that she was the daughter of Jonas Hedge because there has been no record of David and Elizabeth buying land from Jonas Hedge, but a deed is in the records showing that they sold this land in 1768 when they left Frederick. This is doubtful in that Jonas Hedge lived for some years after this date and there is no evidence of a daughter Elizabeth. Elizabeth may have been a Patterson and possibly the daughter or sister of William Patterson that was mentioned in several deeds in Frederick and also in Tyrone Co., NC. This would also account for the name of John and Rebbeca Crockett's son Patterson who was Davy Crockett's brother. Of course this is also only speculation.

David and Elizabeth are proven by Davy Crockett's autobiography to have children by the name of John (Davy's father), William, James and Joseph. A claim filed by William for James and Alexander, the orphans of David Crockett, proves Alexander and shows that James and Alexander were underage in 1779. Robert Crockett is proven by his Revolutionary pension application and by the fact he filed the estate papers with William when David was killed. He also had the authority to sell David's land. There is also evidence of a son named David that was mentioned as David Crockett, Jr. in a court document in Tyrone Co. and that signed one of the petitions that David signed. It has been suggested that jr. could also infer another David Crockett that was younger, but may not be his son. Deeds show that a David Crockett was still living in the vicinity of where the Crocketts lived near what is Rogersville, Hawkins Co., Tn. after David and Elizabeth were killed.

ESTATE OF DAVID CROCKETT

http://travel.nostalgiaville.com/Tennessee/crockettinteresting.htm




HISTORIC TIMELINE OF TENNESSEE


15000 BC
to
5000 BC

Paleo Indians
-Occupied area
·


6000 BC
to
1000 BC
Archaic Indians
-Occupied area
-They created mussel shell mounds along Cumberland River

1000 BC
to
1100 AD
Woodland Indians
-Occupied area
-They were mound builders

1100 AD to
1600 AD
Mississippian Indians
-Occupied area


1541 Desoto
-Desoto, an early Spanish explorer, visited Tennessee area
-He penetrated as far north as Chattanooga
-Claimed area as Spanish possession
-Visited the Indian village of Chiaha
- Located near present day South Pittsburg

1600's Cherokee, Chickasaw, Creek, and Shawnee Indians
-The Cherokee Indians occupied the area of East Tennessee
-Creek Indians lived along the Tennessee River &South Middle Tennessee
-Chickasaws inhabited West Tennessee along the Mississippi River
-Used land as common hunting ground


1673 James Needham
-Sent by Virginia trader to scout trade with Cherokee Indians

1682 Cherokee Indians
-Drive out Shawnees
-Shawnees tried to permanently settle area
-Cherokee settlements were east of Tennessee River
LaSalle
-Established Mississippi Valley territory for France
-Named area Louisiana Territory
-Built Fort Prud'Homme near Memphis
-Became the first white man's building in Tennessee

1711 Eleazer Wiggin
-An English trader in area

1714 M Charleville
-A French Trader from New Orleans
-Built store on French Lick Creek

1721 Indian Treaty
· Nicholson's Treaty

1730 Indian Treaty
-Cumming's Treaty
James Adair
-Traveled with Indians
-Wrote book, "A History of the American Indians"
-Published in London 1775
Dr Thomas Wather
-Sent to explore by Loyal Land Co of Virginia
-Named Cumberland Mountains, Cumberland Gap, and Cumberland River
-Named in honor of the Duke of Cumberland, Prime Minister of England

1732 Indian Treaty
-Oglethorpe's Treaty

1750
1751
1752
1753
1754

1755 Indian Treaty
-Glen's Treaty
-Signed November 24

1756 Indian Treaty
-Waddell's Treaty
Fort Loudon
-Built 1756
-Destroyed by Indians, 1760

1760 Indian Treaty
-Littleton's Treaty

1761 Indian Treaty
-Grant's Treaty
Elisha Walden
-Lead party of long hunters in area
-Named Walden Ridge which forms eastern edge of Cumberland Plateau
Willaim Bean

-Established first white settlement in Tennessee
-Built cabin on Boone's Creek
1762
1763 Indian Treaty
-Treaty of Augusta
1764 Daniel Boone
-Commissioned by Richard Henderson's Land Co, 1764
-Marked trail to Kentucky through Cumberland Gap
-Explored frontier
-Had a home on Yadkin River
1765 Henry Scoggins
-Explored frontier
-Worked for Henderson's Land Co
-Followed Boone's exploration
-Took boat down Cumberland River
-Settled at Mansker's Lick near Nashville
1766
1767
1768 Indian Treaties
-Treaty of Hard Labor
-Signed October 14
-Treaty of Fort Stanwix
-Signed November 5
1769
Late 1700's Early explorers in Tennessee
-John Rains, Kasper Mansker, Abraham Bledsoe, Obediah (Obey) Terril, Uriah Stone, Henry Smith, Ned Cowan, Joseph Holliday, Thomas Spencer
1770 Indian Treaty
-Treaty of Lochabor
-Signed October 18
1771 Four settlements had been established
-South Fork of Holston
-Carter's Valley
-Watauga Valley
-Nolichucky River Valley
1772 Indian Treaty
-Leases of Watauga Settlers & Jacob Brown
-Signed March 19
-Land was transferred
Watuga Association
-Settlers founded Watuga Association
-Established law & order on frontier
-Wrote first constitution in America claiming freedom
-James Robertson became Watuga leader
1773
1774
1775 Indian Treaties
-Transylvania Purchase
-Signed March 17
-Purchase of Carter's Valley
-Signed March 17
-Purchase of Watauga Settlers & Jacob Brown
-Signed March 19
-Second purchase of Jacob Brown
-Signed March 19
-Land was transferred with these treaties
Judge Richard Henderson
-Traveled from North Carolina to Tennessee
-He represented a group called the Transylvania Company
-The company was a group of Carolina land speculators
-Henderson brought wagon loads of trade goods
-Goods estimated worth was 10,000 pounds sterling
-A meeting was held at Sycamore Shoals on the Watuga River
-A majority of Indians were present and most of the settlers of the area
-A scout named Daniel Boone attended meeting
-A purchase was made of approximately 20,000,000 acres of land
-The tract included all of Kentucky
-It also included the areas covered by tributaries of Cumberland River
-Land purchase referred to as the "Treaty of Sycamore Sholes"
-Daniel Boone cut a trail from Virginia to the Cumberland Gap
-The trail was later named the "Wilderness Road"
-Kentucky settlers did not want to be under Henderson's rule
-They negotiated with colony of Virginia to come under their control
-Virginia set up a county to include all of Kentucky
-County was known as Virginia County
-Henderson was given some compensation for his land loss
-The British claimed sovereign power over the land sold
-British Agent John Stuart told Indians they had no right to sell land
-Henderson counted on turmoil of the American Revolution to settle disputes
-Purchase made about a month before Lexington and Concord Battle
Chief Dragging Canoe
-Sale opposed by a young Cherokee Chief
-Dragging Canoe's followers grew in number
-They resisted continuous colonial settlements along Tennessee frontier
-North Carolina extends all the way to the Mississippi River
1776 North Carolina
-Watuga settlers chose to become a part of North Carolina
-North Carolina boundary line extended to Mississippi River
Cherokee War
-Indians attempted an offensive against settlers in upper East Tennessee
-The Indian uprising occurred at the start of the Revolutionary War
-The Indians were associated with the British in spying activities
-They were not under British military guidance
-The Cherokee's were defeated in the War of 1776
-John Sevier became a hero during the war's battles
-Chief Dragging Canoe and his followers seceded from Cherokee Nation
-They migrated southward to the valley around Chickamauga Creek
-They became known as the Chickamauga Indians
John McDonald
-Established a trading post along South Chickamauga Creek
-He traded with the Indians
-His land was later sold to missionaries
-Land became property of the Brainerd Mission
Dragging Canoe
-Becomes leading chief
-The Creek Indians joined with the Chickamauga's to drive out the new settlers
-Raids were conducted up and down the Tennessee and Virginia frontiers
-Patrick Henry, Governor of Virginia joined with North Carolina to wage war with the Indians
-One purpose of war was to gain free access to the Tennessee River
-The war party burned 11 Chickamauga villages
-John McDonald's trading post was overrun
-His supplies, furs and deerskin were later auctioned to the soldiers
-The auction took place along a nearby stream which was latter named Sale Creek
1777 Indian Treaty
-Avery Treaty
-Signed July 20
-Land was transferred
Chickamauga Indians (click here for timeline submitted by T Meeks)10'04
A splinter group of Cherokees who followed Chief Dragging Canoe in leaving the Upper and Middle Cherokee towns, moving to the Chickamauga Creek area around present day Chattanooga. Thanks to Floyd Ayers, Winchester, TN.
Washington County
-Created by North Carolina Legislature
-Encompassed all the state of Tennessee
1778
1779 Sullivan County
-Created in East Tennessee from portion of Washington County
-Now two counties in Tennessee
Settling Tennessee
-James Henderson commissioned an exploration of his new land purchase
-James Robertson made a trip to the Cumberland
-When he returned, plans were made to establish a settlement
-Robertson led a party that drove livestock overland through Kentucky
-They arrived at Nashborough around Christmas
1780 Colonel John Donelson
-Col John Donelson led a flotilla of flatboats from Kingsport
-The vessels were constructed as flatboats
-Women, children, and household goods were shipped on boats
-The boats after reaching the Ohio River had to be paddled upstream to their destination
-Indians attacked in the Chattanooga Gorge
-A trailing boat contained small pox victims
-Several of the passengers were killed, but the Indians caught the disease
-Donelson's daughter, Rachel, was on one of the boats
-Rachel later became wife of President Andrew Jackson
1781
1782 Military Reservation
-North Carolina Legislature set aside a military reservation in Middle Tennessee
-Land grants made to Revolutionary War veterans
-Amount of acreage determined by military rank
1783 Indian Treaty
-Treaty of Nashborough
-Signed in June
Davidson County
-Formed by act of North Carolina Legislature
-Created in Middle Tennessee from portion of Washington County
-Included Cumberland Mountains to Tennessee River
Greene County
-Created from Washington County
-Covers most of East Tennessee
-Washington County becomes small county in upper East Tennessee
-Now four counties in Tennessee



1784 North Carolina
-State of North Carolina extended from Atlantic Ocean to Mississippi River
-Land bounded by Cumberland Mountains, Cumberland & Ohio Rivers was open
-The new colonial government was harassed by heavy indebtedness
-Congress encouraged states to swap vacant land to reduce debts
-Ceded open lands to the federal government in June
-The open lands later became Tennessee
·-Revolutionary War Soldiers were given land grants of 640 to 12,000 acres
·-A Land Grab Act was passed to sell land at about $5.00 per 100 acres
·-Nearly four million acres were sold in seven months
-Congress did not accept responsibility of new territories for two years
-Lawlessness and Indian aggression grew rampant in the territories
-People of the Territory formed independent area to maintain law and order
State of Frankland

-Leaders met to discuss formation of a new state in Jonesboro area
-After three meetings the state of Frankland was formed
-It was later renamed Franklin in honor of Benjamin Franklin
-John Sevier became the areas first governor
-North Carolina demanded the new government be disbanded
-The legislature repealed the act of cession of the land to the United States
-The people of the new area split over allegiance
-John Sevier became head of the Franklin party
-John Tipton headed the North Carolina party
John Sevier elected governor of the state of Frankland (1784)
John Sevier served as governor of Frankland, 1784 and of Tennessee, 1796-1801, 1803-1809-The area comprising Tennessee was first called Frankland
-It was renamed Franklin in honor of Benjamin Franklin
-John Sevier became the areas first governor
-North Carolina demanded the new government be disbanded
-The legislature repealed the act of cession of the land to the United States
-The people of the new area split over allegiance
-John Sevier became head of the Franklin party
-John Tipton headed the North Carolina party
-The new government disbanded and North Carolina again ruled the area in 1788
-Sevier was arrested by Tipton and brought to trial in North Carolina
-Sevier escaped before the trial
-The legislature later restored his privileges
-North Carolina apportioned itself into four districts
-The Western District included "Territory South of the Ohio river"
-John Sevier was elected to the U S Congress from Western North Carolina in 1789
-North Carolina again ceded the Western Territory to the United States in 1790
-David Campbell was named judge of the superior court of the district
-John Sevier became brigadier general of East Tennessee, the Washington District
-James Robertson became brigadier general of Middle Tennessee, the Miro District
-President Washington appointed William Blount first governor of the district
-Blount was born in North Carolina on March 26, 1749
-He first established counties in the Western Territory in the following order:
-Washington, Sullivan, Green, Hawkins, Davidson, Sumner, Tennessee, Knox, Jefferson
-Rocky Mount ate the forks of the Holston and Watuga Rivers was the first capital
-The capital was later moved to White's Fort which Blount renamed Knoxville
-Knoxville was named for U S Secretary of War, Henry Knox
-The governor built a wooden mansion in Knoxville, the first two-story home in the area
-Blount died of the fever in 1800
-Blount College, now the University of Tennessee, was established in 1794
-Tennessee became a state in 1796
-John Sevier was elected the states first governor
-There was over 60,000 people in the territory in 1795
-A state constitutional convention was held in Knoxville in January, 1796
-Andrew Jackson officially proposed the name of the state
-The area had been called Tennessee Country for years
-It was named after the Tennessee River derived from the Indian "Tenase"
-President Washington signed the act, making Tennessee the sixteenth state
-The legislature of the state began functioning on March 28, 1796
-John Sevier was inaugurated first governor of the new state on March 30, 1796
-Sevier was born in Rockingham County, Virginia on September 23, 1745
-He was the oldest of seven children
-He was one of the better educated men of his day
-By age nineteen, he became a merchant in New Market, North Carolina
-Sevier moved to a settlement on the Holston River in 1778
-Shortly thereafter, he relocated to the Watauga settlement
-He led thirty-five successful fights against the raiding Indians
-Sevier fought against the British at the battle of Kings Mountain
-He established many treaties with the Indians during his twelve years as governor
-Sevier broke the original Tennessee County into two new counties:
-Robertson county was named for James Robertson
-Montgomery County was named for Colonel John Montgomery
-He served three consecutive terms as governor from 1796 to 1801
-When he could not succeed himself for a third term, Archibald Roane was elected
-After Roane term ended, Sevier was elected to serve three more terms
-After serving as governor, Sevier was elected to the state senate for one term
-He was then elected to Congress where he remained until his death
-Sevier died from fever on September 24, 1815
-He was buried on the east bank of the Tallapoosa River
-His remains were transferred to Knoxville in 1887
1785 Indian Treaty
-First Franklin Treaty
-Signed May 31
-Treaty of Hopewell
-Signed November 18
-Made the federal government source of authority in all Indian affairs
-Land transferred
1786 Indian Treaty
-Second Franklin Treaty
-Signed August 3
Hawkins County
-Created from Green County
-Covers land in East Tennessee
Sumner County
-Created from Davidson County
-Covers large portion of Middle Tennessee
Wayne County
-Created from Washington County
-Covers extreme East Tennessee
-Now seven counties in Tennessee
David Crockett (click here for interesting Crockett information submitted by R.W. Crockett)11'04
-David Crockett born August 17, 1786
-Crockett's grandfather, also David, first settled in Pennsylvania
-Emigrated to Rogersville Tennessee
-Was killed by a Cherokee Indian attack
-John Crockett was David's father
-He fought in Revolutionary War in Battle of Kings Mountain
-Married Rebecca Hawkins
-Lived near mouth of Limestone Creek in Greene County
-The Crockett family moved about 10 miles to Cove Creek
-Moved again to Jefferson County near Morristown
-Operated a cabin tavern on the new Knoxville-Abingdon Road
-When David was 12, he attended school for four days
-A fight with a boy at school caused him to run away from home
-worked in Virginia for farmers, wagoneers, and hat maker for 2-1/2 years
-David returned home and became an expert marksman
-He returned to school for six months
-David married Polly Finley in Jefferson County on August 12, 1806
-He farmed in the community for two or three years
-A son John Wesley was born on July 10, 1807
-A second son, William was born 1808
-The family moved to near Lynchburg in Moore County in 1808 or 1809
-Another move brought them to Franklin County, 1810
-They located about 10 miles southwest of Winchester on Bean's Creek
-A daughter, Margaret was born 1812
-Crockett enlisted in war against Indian massacres in Southern Alabama
-David's wife Polly died 1813
-Crockett married to Elizabeth Patton, 1815
-A son, Robert Patton was born in Franklin County, 1816
-Land ceded by Chickasaw Indians to United States September, 1816
-Crockett first located in county at the head of Shoal Creek in 1816
-Became temporary magistrate in new government
-Helped organize county 1817
-Lived few blocks south of the Lawrenceburg public square for short time
-A daughter, Rebecca Elvira, was born on December 25, 1818
-Served as one of the first Justices of the Peace
-Was a member of commission appointed to select the county seat
-Elected colonel of Lawrenceburg's regiment of the Tennessee's Militia
-Became first representative in State Legislature, 1821-1822
-A daughter, Matilda, was born on August 2, 1821
-Crockett owned 614 acres in Lawrence County in 13 different tracts
-He first located at the head of Shoal Creek
-The complex cost more than $3,000
-Over 1-1/2 million tons of iron ore mined from Shoal Creek
-Crocket also built a grist mill, powder-mill and distillery
-Complex built on the middle fork of Shoal Creek
-All of complex was washed away when Shoal Creek flooded
-Crockett moved the family west to Gibson County, 1822
-He represented 11 west Tennessee4 counties in Legislature, 1823-1824
-Was elected to U S Congress 1827-1835
-He was defeated in a Congressional election, 1834
-David decided to go to the aid of Texas in land dispute against Mexico
-He died at the Alamo on March 6, 1836
-His wife Elizabeth moved family to Texas
-She died on January 31, 1860 in what was Johnson County, TX
-She is buried in what is now Hood County, TX
·-A "Davy's Day" celebration held in Lawrence County, 1890
-"Davy Crockett Day" celebrated as part of annual Strawberry Festival
May 14, 1955
1787
1788 Tennessee County
-The state of Franklin ended in March
-The new government disbanded and North Carolina again ruled the area
-Sevier was arrested by Tipton and brought to trial in North Carolina
-Sevier escaped before the trial
-The legislature later restored his privileges
-North Carolina apportioned itself into four districts
-The Western District included "Territory South of the Ohio river"
-County created from western part of Davidson County to Tennessee River
-County existed only until 1796
-Now eight counties in Tennessee
1789 North Carolina Legislature
-A second cession of land
-Land later to become Tennessee made to Federal Government
-Little unsold land remained in area
-Area called "Territory South of the Ohio River"
-William Blount named Governor
-John Sevier elected to U S Congress from Western North Carolina in 1789
1790 William Blount became governor of the Territory South of the River Ohio (1790-1796)
-William Blount served as governor the Territory South of the Ohio River, 1790-1796
1791 Indian Treaty
-Blount negotiated Treaty of Holston with Indians
-Blount' Treaty signed July 2
1792 Indian Treaty
-Knox's first Treaty
-Signed February 17
-Jefferson County created from Greene and Hawkins Counties
-Most of land taken from Greene County
Knox County
-Took most of Greene county land
-Became largest county in state
Indian County
-Created from Knox County
-Located in South East Tennessee near Chattanooga
Western District
-Created beyond western boundary of Davidson County to Mississippi River
-Now eleven counties in Tennessee
1793
1794 Indian Treaty
-Knox's second Treaty
-Signed June 26
Sevier County
-Created from Jefferson County
-Now twelve counties in Tennessee
Major James Ore
-Leads battle against Chickamauga Indians
-Destroys towns of Nickajack and Running Water
-Chickamauga power base also destroyed
1795 Blount County
-Created from Knox County
1796 Tennessee
-Admitted to Union after 60,000 people were counted in area as 16th state
-President Washington signed bill June 1
-John Sevier, a leader at Watauga, became first governor
-The capital was placed at Knoxville
Carter County
-Created from Washington County
Granger County
-Created from Hawkins County
Montgomery County
-Created from Tennessee County
Robertson County
-Created from Tennessee and Sumner counties
Tennessee County
-County abolished
-Records included in those of Montgomery County
John Sevier elected governor of Tennessee (1784-1801)
1797 Cocke County
-Created from Jefferson County
1798 Indian Treaty
-First Treaty of Tellico
-Signed October 2
-Land transferred
1799 Smith County
-Created from Sumner County and Indian lands
Williamson County
-Created from Davidson County
Wilson County
-Created from Sumner County
-Wilson and Williamson Counties extended south to the state line
-Both counties claimed land controlled by the Indians
1800 Thomas Jefferson
-Elected President of the United States
-19 Counties existed in state boundaries
1801 Anderson County
-Created from Knox and Granger Counties
Jackson County
-Created from Smith County and Indian lands
Roane County
-Created from Knox County and Indian lands
Claiborne County
-Created from Granger and Hawkins Counties
-23 counties existed in state
Archibald Roane elected governor of Tennessee (1801-1803)
Archibald Roane served as governor of Tennessee, 1801-1803
-Roane was born in Dauphnin County, Pennsylvania in 1760
-He fought in the Revolutionary War
-Roane crossed the Deleware River with General Washington in 1776
-He was present at the surrender of Yorktown
-He became a member of the state constitutional convention in 1796
-Roane was elected governor to succeed John Sevier in 1801
-The state was divided into three congressional districts, Washington, Hamilton, and Mero
-Jackson County was organized during Roane's term
-After his term as governor, Roane served as trustee of the first three colleges in the state:
Blount College, now the University of Tennessee
Greenville College
Washington College in Washington County
-His last official office was as superior court judge in 1811
-Roane died at age sixty on January 18, 1819
-He is buried in Pleasant Forest Cemetery near Campbell's Station
-The state had over 260,000 people in it in 1809
1802
1803 Dixon County
-Created from Montgomery and Robertson Counties
Stewart County
-Created from Montgomery County
Rutherford County
-Created from Davidson, Williamson, and Wilson Counties
John Sevier elected governor of Tennessee (1803-1809)
1804 Indian Treaty
-Second Treaty of Tellico
-Signed October 24
-Formal agreement to open first roads in area
1805 Indian Treaty
-Chickasaw Cession
-Signed July 23
-Land transferred
-Creek Treaty
-Third Treaty of Tellico
-Signed October 25
-Concerned the opening of roads through Cherokee lands
-Fourth Treaty of Tellico
-Signed October 27
-Land transferred
1806 Land Grants
-The United States turns over jurisdiction of land grants to Tennessee
Indian Treaty
-Dearborn's Treaty
-Signed January 7
-Land transferred
Campbell County County
-Created from Anderson and Claiborne Counties
Overton County
-Created from Jackson County and Indian lands
White County
-Created from Jackson and Smith Counties



1807 Indian Treaty
-Robertson and Meigs Treaty
-Signed September 11
Bledsoe County
-Created from Roane County and Indian lands
Franklin County
-Created from Rutherford and Indian lands
Rhea County
-Created from Roane County
Warren County
-Created from White, Jackson, and Smith Counties, and Indian lands
1808
1809 Willie Blount elected governor of Tennessee (1809-1815)
Willie Blount served as governor of Tennessee, 1809-1815
-Born in Bertie County, North Carolina on April 17, 1768
-Was half brother to William Blount, Tennessee's first Territorial Governor
-Moved to Tennessee in 1790
-Was elected judge of the newly formed state in 1796
-Was elected governor in 1809, and re-elected in 1811 and 1813
-Raised $370,000 and 2,000 men for Creek War and War of 1812
-Tennessee received its nickname "Volunteer State" from Blount's efforts
-Sought governor's seat and was defeated by Sam Houston in 1827
-Represented Montgomery County at Constitutional Convention of 1834
-Died on September 10, 1835
-Was buried in a private burial ground near Port Royal
-Remains moved to Greenwood Cemetery at Clarksville in 1877
1810
1811 -Reelfoot Lake was created by an earthquake
1812
1813
1814 Indian Treaty
-Capitulation of the Creeks
-Signed August 9
Andrew Jackson
-Defeated the Creek Indians at Horseshoe Bend
Population
-There were over 300,000 people in the state in 1814
1815 Andrew Jackson
-Defeated the British at the Battle of New Orleans
Joseph McMinn elected governor of the Tennessee (1815-1821)
Joseph McMinn served as governor of Tennessee, 1815-1821
-Was born in Chester County Pennsylvania on June 27, 1758
-Fought in the Revolutionary War
-Settled in Sullivan County which later became Hawkins County
-Was a member of the territorial legislature in 1794
-Helped frame the first Tennessee constitution in 1796
-Became state senator in 1807 and served as speaker until 1809
-Was elected for two more terms in 1817 and 1819
-Became an Indian Agent in 1822
-Died on November 17, 1824
-Is buried near Calhoun in McMinn County
-McMinn County and the town of McMinnville in Waren County named in his honor
-The state capital was moved from Knoxville to Murfreesboro
-The following counties were established under McMinn's six years as governor:
Obion, Weakley, Henry, Gibson, Carrol, Tipton, Haywood, Madison, Henderson, Shelby, Fayette, Hardeman, McNairy, and Hardin
1816 Indian Treaty
-Graham's two Treaties
-Signed March 22
-Jackson & Meriweather's Treaty
-Signed September 14
-Chickasaw Treaty
-Signed September 20



1817 Indian Treaty
-Jackson & McMinn's Treaty
-Signed July 18
-Land transferred
-Included most of the southern portion of Sequatchee Valley
Marion County
-Created from Bledsoe and White Counties, and Indian lands
1818 Indian Treaty
-The Great Chickasaw Cession
-Signed October 19
-Land transferred
1819 Indian Treaty
-Calhoun's Treaty
-Signed February 27
-Land transferred
Hamilton County
-Created from Rhea County and Indian Lands
1820
1821 William Carroll elected governor of Tennessee (1821-1827)
William Carroll served as governor of Tennessee, 1821-1827 & 1829-1835
-Served three successive term as governor twice
-Born near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on March 3, 1788
-Moved to Davidson County about 1806
-Opened the first nail store in Nashville in 1810
-Nashville had a population of about 1,100 in 1810
-Became captain of the Nashville Uniform Volunteers in 1812
-Fought with General Jackson in the Creek War and War of 1812
-Became owner of the first steamboat, the General Jackson, registered in Nashville
-A new state constitution was established in 1834
-Completed the first penitentiary in Nashville, Tennessee in 1831
-The first asylum was completed near Nashville in 1840
-The state capital was moved to Nashville from Murfreesboro in 1826
-Died on March 22, 1844
-Buried in the City Cemetery in Nashville
1822
1823 Indian Treaty
-Overton's Treaty
-Land transferred


1824
1825
1826
1827 Sam Houston elected governor of Tennessee (1827-April 1829)
Sam Houston served as governor of Tennessee, 1827-1829
-Born in Rockingham County, Virginia on March 2, 1793
-Moved to Blount County in 1808
-Wounded at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend
-Lived with the Indians and later negotiated treaties with them
-Studied law in Nashville and opened a law office in Lebanon
-Became district attorney of the Davidson District in Nashville in 1819
-Elected to Congress in 1823
-Became governor in 1827
-Nashville had a population of 6,000 in 1827
-A broken marriage caused Houston to quit as governor and again live with the Indians
-Left the area for Texas to aid in its fight for independence in 1833
-Elected governor of Texas in 1859
-Died on July 26, 1863
-Is buried in Oakwood Cemetery near Huntsville, Texas
1828 Indian Treaty
-Barbour's Treaty
-Signed May 16
1829 William Hall elected governor of Tennessee (April 1829-October 1829)
William Carroll elected governor of Tennessee (1829-1835)
William Hall served as governor of Tennessee, 1829
-Served five and one-half months as governor following Sam Houston's abrupt departure
-Was Speaker of the House and automatically became governor
-Born in Surry County, North Carolina on February 1, 1775
-Moved to the Castalian Springs area in 1779
-Suffered the loss of seven family members in Indian raids
-Elected to the Tennessee House of Representatives in 1797
-Elected to the state Senate in 1821
-Served in Congress in 1831
-Died on October 7, 1856
-Is buried in Sumner County
1830
1831
1832
1833 Indian Treaty
-Stokes & Ellsworth's Treaty
-Signed February 14
1834 Indian Treaty
-Vashon's Treaty
-Signed February 10
-Voided by President Andrew Jackson
1835 Indian Treaty
-Treaty of Removal
-Resulted in the Trail of Tears
-Signed December 26
Newton Cannon elected governor of Tennessee (1835-1839)
1836
1837
1838 Trail of Tears
The year that most of the forced removal of the Cherokee Indians took place with all of them either leaving from, or passing through Tennessee. Thanks to Floyd Ayers, Winchester, TN
1839 James Knox Polk elected governor of Tennessee (1839-1841)
James Knox Polk served as governor of Tennessee, 1839-1841
-Born in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina on November 2, 1795
-Moved with family to Tennessee in 1805
-Studied at Murfreesboro College and the University of North Carolina
-Graduated with honors in 1818
-Set up a law practice in Columbia
-Served in state legislature in 1825
-Elected to U S Congress and served as Speaker from 1835 to 1839
-Became President of the United States in 1844
-Died from cholera on June 15, 1849
-Was buried in City Cemetery in Nashville
-Remains were later moved to the state capitol grounds
1840
1841 James Chamberlain Jones elected governor of Tennessee (1841-1845)
James Chamberland Jones served as governor of Tennessee, 1841-1845
-Born in Davidson County on June 7, 1809
-Became a farmer in Wilson County
-Elected to the legislature in 1837
-Nashville became the permanent state capitol in 1840's
-The cornerstone of the capitol was laid in 1845
-The capitol building was completed in 1956
-Elected to the U S Senate in 1851
-Died at age fifty on October 29, 1859
-Is buried at the Elmwood Cemetery in Memphis
1842
1843
1844
1845 Aaron Vail Brown elected governor of Tennessee (1845-1847)
Aaron Vail Brown served as governor of Tennessee, 1845-1847
-Born in Brunswick County, Virginia on August 15, 1795
-Family moved to Giles County in 1813
-Graduated from University of North Carolina and joined his family in 1814
-Studied law and became a partner with James Polk
-Elected to state senate in 1821
-Served in the U S Congress from 1839 to 1845
-Appointed postmaster general by President Buchanan and moved to Washington
-Died of pneumonia on March 8, 1859
-Is buried at Mt Olivet Cemetery in Nashville
1846
1847 Neil S Brown elected governor of Tennessee (1847-1849)
Neill S Brown served as governor of Tennessee, 1847-1849
-Born in Giles County in 1810
-Admitted to the bar and opened an office in Pulaski in 1834
-Fought in the Seminole War in 1836
-Served six years in the state legislature
-The first telegraph company was established in Tennessee in 1848
-The state formed its first historical society in 1848
-Appointed minister to Russia in 1850
-Elected to the state legislature where he became speaker in 1855
-Served as member of the constitutional convention of 1879
-Died on January 30, 1886
-Is buried at Mount Olivet Cemetery in Nashville
1848
1849 William Trousdale elected governor of Tennessee (1849-1851)
William Trousdale served as governor of Tennessee, 1849-1851
-Born in Orange County, North Carolina in 1790
-His father James Trousdale was a captain in the Revolutionary War
-James received a land grant, including the present site of Gallatin, in 1784
-Moved to Tennessee and settled in Sumner County in 1796
-Served in the state senate in 1835
-Fought in the Creek and Mexican War
-Became minister to Brazil in 1852
-Died on March 27, 1872
-Is buried in Gallatin
http://www.nostalgiaville.com/travel/Tennessee/tennesseehistory.htm


Edited by Locksley (01/16/08 02:06 AM)
_________________________
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