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#532180 - 12/18/07 08:42 AM Re: how much (habitat management) [Re: kholmes]
brier rabbit
4 Point


Registered: 07/22/07
Posts: 130
Loc: sumner tn

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DEERCHASER007. Their are other types of plants you may want to look at growing. strawberry bush is loved by deer and hevily browsed. autum olive is also browsed by deer and make great cover and grows in the poorist of soils. Their are also some very good chestnut hybrids now that can grow in foristed areas. chiness chestnuts must be grow out in the open they do not grow tall enough to grow in forests. look for timber hybrids they will start to drop nuts in about 4-5 years, they bloom in early summer so late frosts do not afect nut production and they are fairly drought tolorent. Try some sawtooth oaks very early producers also.
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#532287 - 12/18/07 10:08 AM Re: how much (habitat management) [Re: brier rabbit]
BSK
Jerkasourous of the non-typical kind
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Registered: 03/11/99
Posts: 65979
Loc: Nashville, TN

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brier rabbit,

Lots of planting are good for wildlife, but what most landowners/managers need is massive amounts of natural food sources and cover. Timber removal/thinning is definitely the most cost effective way of accomplishing that.
_________________________
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"There is no reasoning someone out of a position he has not reasoned himself into." --Clive James

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#532414 - 12/18/07 11:50 AM Re: how much (habitat management) [Re: BSK]
Quailman
8 Point


Registered: 08/04/03
Posts: 1418
Loc: Winchester, TN

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 Originally Posted By: BSK
brier rabbit,

Lots of planting are good for wildlife, but what most landowners/managers need is massive amounts of natural food sources and cover. Timber removal/thinning is definitely the most cost effective way of accomplishing that.


Definitely agree with this statement. Landowners spend way too much money on trying to create food sources, when everything they need is laying in the soil, waiting to be released. You can accomplish a great deal more by using herbicides, disking, and burning than you can by buying expensive food plot mixtures and specially propagated tree and shrub species. The techniques listed above are much more economical in the long run and provide as much if not more benefit to wildlife.
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#532457 - 12/18/07 12:24 PM Re: how much (habitat management) [Re: BSK]
TAS
6 Point


Registered: 08/20/07
Posts: 563
Loc: Hickman County

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 Originally Posted By: BSK
Late summer and early fall, just as the water is going down out of the leaves and into the roots. September is a good time.
Thank you!
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#532772 - 12/18/07 04:50 PM Re: how much (habitat management) [Re: TAS]
birddoginQ
4 Point


Registered: 11/11/07
Posts: 171
Loc: Knox, TN

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very true, think about how many post have been posted recently about what folks have planted and deer dont seem to be touching. why not capitalize on what is already there and what the deer already know. Stawberry bush is a good native plant to manage for along with other native browse such as wild berries (black/blue), beggar tick, clover, viburnum, honey suckle, beauty berry.... the list goes on. Not to mention trees, dogwood is a deer favorite (leaves in spring and summer, fruit in the fall) and honey locust is another over looked tree.
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#532778 - 12/18/07 04:54 PM Re: how much (habitat management) [Re: birddoginQ]
birddoginQ
4 Point


Registered: 11/11/07
Posts: 171
Loc: Knox, TN

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fall would also be the time of year to do any tree work such as girdling to prevent excessive sprouting. Trees cut either for management of timber harvest (which is also managment) are subject to excessive sprouting as the tree is bring everyting up from the bottom anyway in an attempt to grow. Sprouting is always an issue in situations where herbacide is not used but can be minimized with planning the time of year you do it.
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#532966 - 12/18/07 07:08 PM Re: how much (habitat management) [Re: birddoginQ]
brier rabbit
4 Point


Registered: 07/22/07
Posts: 130
Loc: sumner tn

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BKS
I am not dissageeing with you but chestnuts were once a very big part of out eastern woodlands. they where nearly wiped out by a blight imported on some chinese chestnut trees. The hybrid chestnut trees are not very expensive they grow fast and produce lots of nuts. great food for wildlife. the strawberry bush is native to the eastern states and is usually browsed out by deer. i still find some growing on my place but are usually very small. if you can find some of these small woody shrub growing on your land they are definetly worth tending to.

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#533537 - 12/19/07 07:47 AM Re: how much (habitat management) [Re: brier rabbit]
BSK
Jerkasourous of the non-typical kind
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Registered: 03/11/99
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The problem is brier rabbit, trying to nurture just a few plants doesn't produce much food volume. What most lands in expansive hardwoods areas (like much of TN) lack is total food volume. Instead of worrying about a couple of species that are attractive to deer, simply let Nature take its course by allowing sunlight to reach the ground through timber removal. I would always worry about total food volume first, then worry about specific attractive species once food volume requirements have been met.

Always address the lowest hole in the management bucket first. That is the hole most of your management effort is leaking out of.
_________________________
"Know where you stand, and stand there" --Jesuit Father Daniel Berrigan

"There is no reasoning someone out of a position he has not reasoned himself into." --Clive James

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#533568 - 12/19/07 08:10 AM Re: how much (habitat management) [Re: BSK]
Wes Parrish
16 Point


Registered: 06/12/02
Posts: 19470
Loc: Knoxville-Dover-Union City, TN

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 Originally Posted By: BSK
I would always worry about total food volume first . . .

Always address the lowest hole in the management bucket first. That is the hole most of your management effort is leaking out of.

I agree with nearly everything posted thus far.
But would particularly like to add something regarding BSK's "lowest hole".

Provided you have diverse habitat, then the lowest hole in your bucket may be a lack of forage mass in late winter. Therefore, if you're planting food plots, shouldn't you focus on plants that provide the greatest potential forage mass during late winter?

For most of my plots, I think am best accomplishing this with a mix of mostly brassicas, mainly because the deer tend to not like it much during its early growing stages, allowing a great amount of forage mass to be produced. However, Dwarf Essex Rape (DER) is one type of brassica I may reduce in my future mixes for two reasons: One, the deer seem to like it better, and hit it earlier, in some cases eating it up before the most critical time. Two, other less-preferred (by deer as a food item) brassicas seem to grow taller and produce much more food volume. I've been most impressed with the Biologic Maximum in terms of filling the lowest hole in my bucket. But the Maximum is expensive while the DER is cheap, so am sure will continue to use some of both.

One other thing.
Few things are as good for year-round nutrition as a mix of various clovers with about 10 - 20% of the mix being chicory. If you produce the huge forage mass of brassicas I'm talking about, it may shade out your clovers, and you may need to do some early spring/late winter frost seeding (once the brassicas have been eaten down) to maintain the clover plots for spring/summer/fall. I look at the clover plots to add some extra protein when the deer need it most, and the brassicas to add some high-quality winter forage when needed most. But when push comes to shove, the deer may need that extra winter forage more than they need extra spring/summer protein.

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#533715 - 12/19/07 09:43 AM Re: how much (habitat management) [Re: Wes Parrish]
BSK
Jerkasourous of the non-typical kind
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Registered: 03/11/99
Posts: 65979
Loc: Nashville, TN

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Wes,

And that's why I plant primarily fall/winter annuals in my plots. The weeds I produce in my clear-cuts in summer are better (both volume and nutrition-wise) than anything I could grow in my thin-soil food plots in summer.
_________________________
"Know where you stand, and stand there" --Jesuit Father Daniel Berrigan

"There is no reasoning someone out of a position he has not reasoned himself into." --Clive James

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