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#3556016 - 01/21/14 07:22 PM Honey Suckle
Bone Collector
14 Point


Registered: 09/09/09
Posts: 8886
Loc: Murfreesboro, TN

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I know some are going to disagree with me because it is an invasive species, but i have done some research and read good things about introducing it in areas of your property.

Problem is, where do you get it aside, from finding a plant and transplanting?

Also if you do find a plant I read were some sell "clippings" on e-bay.

what do you clip?
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“There are hunters and there are victims. By your discipline, cunning, obedience and alertness, you will decide if you are a hunter or a victim.”
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#3556078 - 01/21/14 07:49 PM Re: Honey Suckle [Re: Bone Collector]
Wes Parrish
16 Point


Registered: 06/12/02
Posts: 19187
Loc: Knoxville-Dover-Union City, TN

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Wherever you want it, start stretching some wire between posts or trees. Birds will land on the wire and deposit the seeds. This is part of why you see it so much along fence rows.
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#3556083 - 01/21/14 07:50 PM Re: Honey Suckle [Re: Bone Collector]
Boll Weevil
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Registered: 06/26/11
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No disagreement here; plant it whenever/wherever you can. Pluck the little purplish black berries off to plant in places that they can climb with good sunlight like hedgerows and the edges of brush piles.
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#3556896 - 01/22/14 11:01 AM Re: Honey Suckle [Re: Boll Weevil]
Doskil
6 Point


Registered: 09/23/07
Posts: 740
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Bush honeysuckle or vine honeysuckle?
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#3556971 - 01/22/14 12:09 PM Re: Honey Suckle [Re: Doskil]
Boll Weevil
8 Point


Registered: 06/26/11
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 Originally Posted By: Doskil
Bush honeysuckle or vine honeysuckle?

Yes.

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#3557042 - 01/22/14 01:02 PM Re: Honey Suckle [Re: Boll Weevil]
BSK
Jerkasourous of the non-typical kind
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Registered: 03/11/99
Posts: 64982
Loc: Nashville, TN

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You definitely do NOT want bush honeysuckle. It is not used much by any wildlife. Now the vine Japanese honeysuckle can be a useful winter food source for deer. The problem is, if you have deer, establishing honeysuckle is extremely difficult (because they eat it all). In fact, honeysuckle vine is so invasive and ubiquitous, that if you DON'T have it, it's probably because you have too many deer for the current winter food sources available. Increase other natural food sources, and/or decrease the deer density, and suddenly Japanese honeysuckle will appear.

Japanese honeysuckle vine is an excellent "indicator" plant in most of TN. If deer density is matched will with winter food sources, you will have Japanese honeysuckle. If you DON'T have Japanese honeysuckle, you most likely have too many deer for the current winter food sources.
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"There is no reasoning someone out of a position he has not reasoned himself into." --Clive James

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#3557146 - 01/22/14 02:21 PM Re: Honey Suckle [Re: BSK]
Bone Collector
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Registered: 09/09/09
Posts: 8886
Loc: Murfreesboro, TN

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 Originally Posted By: BSK
You definitely do NOT want bush honeysuckle. It is not used much by any wildlife. Now the vine Japanese honeysuckle can be a useful winter food source for deer. The problem is, if you have deer, establishing honeysuckle is extremely difficult (because they eat it all). In fact, honeysuckle vine is so invasive and ubiquitous, that if you DON'T have it, it's probably because you have too many deer for the current winter food sources available. Increase other natural food sources, and/or decrease the deer density, and suddenly Japanese honeysuckle will appear.

Japanese honeysuckle vine is an excellent "indicator" plant in most of TN. If deer density is matched will with winter food sources, you will have Japanese honeysuckle. If you DON'T have Japanese honeysuckle, you most likely have too many deer for the current winter food sources.


Funny you mention that. I smelled it in April of last year along the fence row. I want to move some into other areas. I need to find it, but it seems like it disappears fast.

Japanese Honeysuckle is the one with the flowers that you can pull the center piece out of and suck on it and it tastes like honey, right?

What do you cut off to transplant it?
_________________________
Semper Fidelis!

“There are hunters and there are victims. By your discipline, cunning, obedience and alertness, you will decide if you are a hunter or a victim.”
General James Mattis

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#3557838 - 01/23/14 07:39 AM Re: Honey Suckle [Re: Bone Collector]
BSK
Jerkasourous of the non-typical kind
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Registered: 03/11/99
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 Originally Posted By: Bone Collector
Japanese Honeysuckle is the one with the flowers that you can pull the center piece out of and suck on it and it tastes like honey, right?


Correct.

 Quote:
What do you cut off to transplant it?


If you really want to put out the effort, you can cut a bunch of it and just lightly disk the sections into the ground where you want it (having moist soil helps with rapid rooting). I've even seen people cut sections and keep them in wet newspaper in sunlight until the sections begin to root before planting. However, the biggest problem is deer eating every little sprig that sprouts. If honeysuckle doesn't exist naturally, the browse pressure keeping it from existing is the real problem, and planted sprigs will need protection to become established. I've seen "tents" of chicken wire used to protect the growing honeysuckle. This allows the honeysuckle to become established, and protects the plant a foot or two off the ground, but allows deer to eat the excess that grows beyond the wire.
_________________________
"Know where you stand, and stand there" --Jesuit Father Daniel Berrigan

"There is no reasoning someone out of a position he has not reasoned himself into." --Clive James

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#3557848 - 01/23/14 07:46 AM Re: Honey Suckle [Re: BSK]
BlountArrow
10 Point


Registered: 07/13/12
Posts: 2539
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It's interesting to hear of people actually wanting to establish Jap Honeysuckle. I guess the areas I hunt have just never been void of it. As a matter of fact, a TWRA biologist last year recommended I spray a good portion of mine back and kill it. I have not done so. I think it could be a good idea if I was further along down the road in my "habitat rejuvenation plan", but I'm not there yet. After reading posts since then, I think maybe some biologists tend to down play or not appreciate the importance honey suckle can play as a winter food source. That's just my opinion from what I've read. Still though, it baffles me a little to see a post about trying to introduce honey suckle \:\) for reasons previously stated. Good luck though; I just can't imagine it being very difficult to introduce to your property.
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#3557929 - 01/23/14 08:43 AM Re: Honey Suckle [Re: BlountArrow]
BSK
Jerkasourous of the non-typical kind
Non-Typical


Registered: 03/11/99
Posts: 64982
Loc: Nashville, TN

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 Originally Posted By: BlountArrow
It's interesting to hear of people actually wanting to establish Jap Honeysuckle. I guess the areas I hunt have just never been void of it. As a matter of fact, a TWRA biologist last year recommended I spray a good portion of mine back and kill it. I have not done so. I think it could be a good idea if I was further along down the road in my "habitat rejuvenation plan", but I'm not there yet. After reading posts since then, I think maybe some biologists tend to down play or not appreciate the importance honey suckle can play as a winter food source. That's just my opinion from what I've read. Still though, it baffles me a little to see a post about trying to introduce honey suckle \:\) for reasons previously stated. Good luck though; I just can't imagine it being very difficult to introduce to your property.


Some biologists are very anti honeysuckle, simply because it's non-native and can be very invasive. However, I'm more neutral if not positive about it. In some circumstances, for a winter food source, it's better than most other natural food sources.

In large sections of the western Highland Rim (expansive forests), deer have eaten all of it away. In those circumstances, you won't be able to establish it due to deer browse pressure. But in these areas, if enough timber is thinned allowing sunlight to hit the ground over a large enough area, honeysuckle will "magically" appear all on its own.
_________________________
"Know where you stand, and stand there" --Jesuit Father Daniel Berrigan

"There is no reasoning someone out of a position he has not reasoned himself into." --Clive James

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