Tndeer Logo

Page 1 of 1 1
Topic Options
#3326845 - 08/18/13 04:27 PM Works in Progress
Poser
Mud Dauber
16 Point


Registered: 07/28/10
Posts: 12881
Loc: Tennessee

Offline
I went round two with a pair of Venison salamis over the weekend. I think these are going to come out better than my first as I realized a couple of mistakes.


After I finished preparing the 2nd stage of the Salami, I realized I had about a pound and a half of leftover fatback from the batch, so I decided to attempt Lardo, which a very traditional form of curing fatback. I rubbed the cut of fat with curing salt, seas salt, brown sugar, juniper berries, cloves and rosemary. Vacuum sealed it (traditionally, they are cured in marble casks. It will cure for 6 months in in the bag.


While we were out eating the best ribs in Memphis at Alex's Tavern, my friend mentioned having a wild hog belly in his freezer that his buddy had killed in Arkansas. Pancetta, which is, by the looks of it at least, a relatively simple form of curing pork belly. We make a pact to cure it this afternoon. Late that night, per instructions, I texted him a reminder to thaw the pork belly out. Apparently, he managed to set his house alarm off in the process of performing a late night, drunken, freezer raid (and, in the process, managed to get in big trouble with the mrs. Busted.)

Anyway, hangovers thumping, we met up on Sunday and put together a cure of Cure #2, Sea Salt, Brown sugar, crushed pepper, cinnamon sticks, bay leaf, juniper berries, thyme, nutmeg, toasted fennel seed, cloves, ground ginger, coriander, garlic..... and probably a couple of other "old world" spices. This was sealed up with a bit of air in the bag. It will cure for 7-10 days, flipping the bag each day. After that, it will get tied up in cheese cloth and hung for several weeks.


At present: Venion Summer sausges, Dry cured Venison sausges, Venison Bresaola (in the cheese cloth), 2 Venison Salamis.
_________________________
It doesn't have to be fun to be fun.

Wild & crazy, can't be stopped. Only the strong will survive.

Keep your knife sharp and your skillet greasy.

http://www.GoCarnivore.com

Top
#3327911 - 08/19/13 12:40 PM Re: Works in Progress [Re: Poser]
Kimber45 Moderator
Peace Maker
16 Point


Registered: 07/10/08
Posts: 18019
Loc: Close to Jackson, TN

Offline
Poser you need your own specialty meat shop or something! Based on the projects I've seen posted by you, you undoubtedly love fooling with food and appear to be dang skilled at it too!
_________________________
Patriotism is not short, frenzied outbursts of emotion, but the tranquil and steady dedication of a lifetime.

Top
#3328014 - 08/19/13 02:17 PM Re: Works in Progress [Re: Kimber45]
Poser
Mud Dauber
16 Point


Registered: 07/28/10
Posts: 12881
Loc: Tennessee

Offline
 Originally Posted By: Kimber45
Poser you need your own specialty meat shop or something! Based on the projects I've seen posted by you, you undoubtedly love fooling with food and appear to be dang skilled at it too!


Thanks. Charcuterie seemed like the natural next step, considering the amount of game meat I always have on hand. Having "ready to eat" venison laying around, means a lot more of it gets eaten on a regular basis and pretty much guarantees what you give away gets eaten. A lot of people will ask for venison, but never get around to cooking it because they don't know what to do with it. If you give someone, say, a stick of Pepperoni, it gets eaten.

While it would be cool to take such ideas to the next level, I'm not so sure the market demand is there, plus the FDA makes artisan practices difficult for selling, since curing temperatures are higher than the FDA minimum for meat storage. I'm guessing that you could offer charcuterie as an extension of deer processing since that meat is not FDA regulated, however, it would be $$. It would be cool to offer venison prosciutto, salami, etc, but you would need a customer base willing to spend $300 on a deer processing, curing job and also be willing to wait weeks and/or months for certain cuts to properly cure. -not sure if you could make money at that. Interesting idea, though.
_________________________
It doesn't have to be fun to be fun.

Wild & crazy, can't be stopped. Only the strong will survive.

Keep your knife sharp and your skillet greasy.

http://www.GoCarnivore.com

Top
#3328292 - 08/19/13 06:09 PM Re: Works in Progress [Re: Poser]
Kimber45 Moderator
Peace Maker
16 Point


Registered: 07/10/08
Posts: 18019
Loc: Close to Jackson, TN

Offline
 Originally Posted By: Poser
 Originally Posted By: Kimber45
Poser you need your own specialty meat shop or something! Based on the projects I've seen posted by you, you undoubtedly love fooling with food and appear to be dang skilled at it too!


Thanks. Charcuterie seemed like the natural next step, considering the amount of game meat I always have on hand. Having "ready to eat" venison laying around, means a lot more of it gets eaten on a regular basis and pretty much guarantees what you give away gets eaten. A lot of people will ask for venison, but never get around to cooking it because they don't know what to do with it. If you give someone, say, a stick of Pepperoni, it gets eaten.

While it would be cool to take such ideas to the next level, I'm not so sure the market demand is there, plus the FDA makes artisan practices difficult for selling, since curing temperatures are higher than the FDA minimum for meat storage. I'm guessing that you could offer charcuterie as an extension of deer processing since that meat is not FDA regulated, however, it would be $$. It would be cool to offer venison prosciutto, salami, etc, but you would need a customer base willing to spend $300 on a deer processing, curing job and also be willing to wait weeks and/or months for certain cuts to properly cure. -not sure if you could make money at that. Interesting idea, though.


You would be surprised.. We have a local guy who's gone into processing and is anal about his end product. He has as many as 10 smokers going making jerky, stays wrapped up making summer sausage and trail bologna AND it can be $300 with a decent sized deer - and he turns deer away. He takes getting every bit of silverskin and proper seasoning etc to a whole new level - which again keeps him so full that he works 7-days a week once muzzle loader starts and his wife as well. They are young and passionate about it.....with a magnificent end product in high demand. These chemical companies and big farmers etc get these specialtie cuts done and give them away to customers for gifts etc is what I hear.
Either way, unless his process control methods change, he'll get to do one of mine every year in jerky, summer suasage and trail bologna.. I've had many a deer done at Yoder Bros and thought they were the best - this guy is much better.
_________________________
Patriotism is not short, frenzied outbursts of emotion, but the tranquil and steady dedication of a lifetime.

Top
#3328345 - 08/19/13 06:49 PM Re: Works in Progress [Re: Kimber45]
Poser
Mud Dauber
16 Point


Registered: 07/28/10
Posts: 12881
Loc: Tennessee

Offline
 Originally Posted By: Kimber45
 Originally Posted By: Poser
 Originally Posted By: Kimber45
Poser you need your own specialty meat shop or something! Based on the projects I've seen posted by you, you undoubtedly love fooling with food and appear to be dang skilled at it too!


Thanks. Charcuterie seemed like the natural next step, considering the amount of game meat I always have on hand. Having "ready to eat" venison laying around, means a lot more of it gets eaten on a regular basis and pretty much guarantees what you give away gets eaten. A lot of people will ask for venison, but never get around to cooking it because they don't know what to do with it. If you give someone, say, a stick of Pepperoni, it gets eaten.

While it would be cool to take such ideas to the next level, I'm not so sure the market demand is there, plus the FDA makes artisan practices difficult for selling, since curing temperatures are higher than the FDA minimum for meat storage. I'm guessing that you could offer charcuterie as an extension of deer processing since that meat is not FDA regulated, however, it would be $$. It would be cool to offer venison prosciutto, salami, etc, but you would need a customer base willing to spend $300 on a deer processing, curing job and also be willing to wait weeks and/or months for certain cuts to properly cure. -not sure if you could make money at that. Interesting idea, though.


You would be surprised.. We have a local guy who's gone into processing and is anal about his end product. He has as many as 10 smokers going making jerky, stays wrapped up making summer sausage and trail bologna AND it can be $300 with a decent sized deer - and he turns deer away. He takes getting every bit of silverskin and proper seasoning etc to a whole new level - which again keeps him so full that he works 7-days a week once muzzle loader starts and his wife as well. They are young and passionate about it.....with a magnificent end product in high demand. These chemical companies and big farmers etc get these specialtie cuts done and give them away to customers for gifts etc is what I hear.
Either way, unless his process control methods change, he'll get to do one of mine every year in jerky, summer suasage and trail bologna.. I've had many a deer done at Yoder Bros and thought they were the best - this guy is much better.


Interesting. I'd expect that cost that high might could fly with a small clietele base in Memphis and Nashville, but most hunters seems to want the cheapest processing job as possible. On the cured meats, do you get your meat back, or is it an exchange program?
_________________________
It doesn't have to be fun to be fun.

Wild & crazy, can't be stopped. Only the strong will survive.

Keep your knife sharp and your skillet greasy.

http://www.GoCarnivore.com

Top
#3330359 - 08/21/13 10:14 AM Re: Works in Progress [Re: Poser]
Kimber45 Moderator
Peace Maker
16 Point


Registered: 07/10/08
Posts: 18019
Loc: Close to Jackson, TN

Offline
 Originally Posted By: Poser
 Originally Posted By: Kimber45
 Originally Posted By: Poser
 Originally Posted By: Kimber45
Poser you need your own specialty meat shop or something! Based on the projects I've seen posted by you, you undoubtedly love fooling with food and appear to be dang skilled at it too!


Thanks. Charcuterie seemed like the natural next step, considering the amount of game meat I always have on hand. Having "ready to eat" venison laying around, means a lot more of it gets eaten on a regular basis and pretty much guarantees what you give away gets eaten. A lot of people will ask for venison, but never get around to cooking it because they don't know what to do with it. If you give someone, say, a stick of Pepperoni, it gets eaten.

While it would be cool to take such ideas to the next level, I'm not so sure the market demand is there, plus the FDA makes artisan practices difficult for selling, since curing temperatures are higher than the FDA minimum for meat storage. I'm guessing that you could offer charcuterie as an extension of deer processing since that meat is not FDA regulated, however, it would be $$. It would be cool to offer venison prosciutto, salami, etc, but you would need a customer base willing to spend $300 on a deer processing, curing job and also be willing to wait weeks and/or months for certain cuts to properly cure. -not sure if you could make money at that. Interesting idea, though.


You would be surprised.. We have a local guy who's gone into processing and is anal about his end product. He has as many as 10 smokers going making jerky, stays wrapped up making summer sausage and trail bologna AND it can be $300 with a decent sized deer - and he turns deer away. He takes getting every bit of silverskin and proper seasoning etc to a whole new level - which again keeps him so full that he works 7-days a week once muzzle loader starts and his wife as well. They are young and passionate about it.....with a magnificent end product in high demand. These chemical companies and big farmers etc get these specialtie cuts done and give them away to customers for gifts etc is what I hear.
Either way, unless his process control methods change, he'll get to do one of mine every year in jerky, summer suasage and trail bologna.. I've had many a deer done at Yoder Bros and thought they were the best - this guy is much better.


Interesting. I'd expect that cost that high might could fly with a small clietele base in Memphis and Nashville, but most hunters seems to want the cheapest processing job as possible. On the cured meats, do you get your meat back, or is it an exchange program?


The good thing is if you're High End to begin with the cheap folks wont bother you much, that is until they see the High End Folks buying your Top Notch stuff at which point they'll bite the bullet so to keep up with the Jone's \:\)
I see that philosophy work in a lot of the retail hunting equipment market already and see it happening for the local processor too as I mentioned. Based on your post's and pic's...I'd say your knowledge and expertise/experience on specialty meats is leaps and bounds ahead of his too. Of course for all this encouragement I will expect free samples when you get started

I "think" you get your meat back only even on cured stuff


Edited by Kimber45 (08/21/13 10:15 AM)
_________________________
Patriotism is not short, frenzied outbursts of emotion, but the tranquil and steady dedication of a lifetime.

Top
#3330383 - 08/21/13 10:23 AM Re: Works in Progress [Re: Kimber45]
Poser
Mud Dauber
16 Point


Registered: 07/28/10
Posts: 12881
Loc: Tennessee

Offline
What is the name of the processor you are referring to?
_________________________
It doesn't have to be fun to be fun.

Wild & crazy, can't be stopped. Only the strong will survive.

Keep your knife sharp and your skillet greasy.

http://www.GoCarnivore.com

Top
#3330543 - 08/21/13 12:43 PM Re: Works in Progress [Re: Poser]
Kimber45 Moderator
Peace Maker
16 Point


Registered: 07/10/08
Posts: 18019
Loc: Close to Jackson, TN

Offline
Matthew Lents

731-697-7two30
_________________________
Patriotism is not short, frenzied outbursts of emotion, but the tranquil and steady dedication of a lifetime.

Top
Page 1 of 1 1


Moderator:  Bobby G, RUGER, Unicam, gtk, CBU93, stretch, Kimber45, Crappie Luck, Mrs.Unicam 
Hop to:
Top Posters
4105517
RUGER
87003
Deer Assassin
65411
BSK
61015
Crappie Luck
51376
spitndrum
Newest Members
Mik475, AaronB, Bad Wolf, jw3783, Jesse91
13279 Registered Users
Who's Online
115 registered (Nhill, Mark71211, lung-buster, Tims, Jcalder, Bass1090, 11 invisible) and 163 anonymous users online.
Forum Stats
13279 Members
42 Forums
93187 Topics
1089294 Posts

Max Online: 788 @ 11/11/13 08:06 PM
Moon Phase
CURRENT MOON
September
Su M Tu W Th F Sa
1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30
Forum Donations
The TnDeer.Com Deer Talk Forum is for Tennessee Deer Hunters by Tennessee Deer Hunters. If you enjoy using our Talk Forum and would like to contribute to help in it's up-keep. Just submit your contribution by clicking on the DONATE button below and paying with PayPal or a major credit card. Any amount is much appreciated. Thanks for your support!

TN Burn Safe

Generated in 0.089 seconds in which 0 seconds were spent on a total of 14 queries. Zlib compression enabled.