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#3284836 - 07/07/13 03:57 PM Re: Blood Trailing deer. [Re: EastTNHunter]
BSK
Jerkasourous of the non-typical kind
Non-Typical


Registered: 03/11/99
Posts: 65411
Loc: Nashville, TN

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 Originally Posted By: EastTNHunter
 Originally Posted By: BSK


And although I've seen it with every weapon type and every projectile, I will say it happens more often (in firearms) with fast-expanding bullets. That's why, personally, I prefer penetrating bullets over fast-expanding bullets. An exit wound makes a bloodless trail less likely.


I couldn't agree more. That is why I went away from Ballistic Tips and Powerbelts, and lightweight Shockwaves/SSTs. I prefer a heavy for caliber bullet and one that holds together pretty good.


I avoid any "power-shock" or Ballistic Tip bullet of any kind, as well as any "expanding" type sabotted MZ bullet. I use "controlled expansion" rifle bullets and full-diameter MZ bullets that expand little at all (you don't need to expand a 50-caliber bullet--that's a big entrance and exit hole).
_________________________
"Know where you stand, and stand there" --Jesuit Father Daniel Berrigan

"There is no reasoning someone out of a position he has not reasoned himself into." --Clive James

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#3284843 - 07/07/13 03:59 PM Re: Blood Trailing deer. [Re: JCDEERMAN]
BSK
Jerkasourous of the non-typical kind
Non-Typical


Registered: 03/11/99
Posts: 65411
Loc: Nashville, TN

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 Originally Posted By: JCDEERMAN
As I do with all deer whether I see them drop or not, I attempted to look for blood along the path he took. No blood found, but followed his tracks and turned over leaves right to him. This keeps me "in tune". I think this should be good practice for everyone. After numerous times doing this, one day it will pay off when you NEED all of that self-taught experience.


I can't agree more with this. Even if you know exactly where a deer is, practice blood-trailing at every opportunity. Blood-trailing is one of those skills you can never practice enough. That kind of relentless practice will pay off huge some day.
_________________________
"Know where you stand, and stand there" --Jesuit Father Daniel Berrigan

"There is no reasoning someone out of a position he has not reasoned himself into." --Clive James

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#3284924 - 07/07/13 05:38 PM Re: Blood Trailing deer. [Re: BSK]
102
10 Point


Registered: 08/01/02
Posts: 4047
Loc: Tennessee

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 Originally Posted By: BSK
 Originally Posted By: JCDEERMAN
As I do with all deer whether I see them drop or not, I attempted to look for blood along the path he took. No blood found, but followed his tracks and turned over leaves right to him. This keeps me "in tune". I think this should be good practice for everyone. After numerous times doing this, one day it will pay off when you NEED all of that self-taught experience.


I can't agree more with this. Even if you know exactly where a deer is, practice blood-trailing at every opportunity. Blood-trailing is one of those skills you can never practice enough. That kind of relentless practice will pay off huge some day.



X 3

Also, be there on the gutting.
_________________________
God, Family, Job, Bowhunting
Luck is where Opportunity and Preparation MEET!
When in doubt...back out!
SCAPAS.stay calm and pick a spot.

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#3285153 - 07/07/13 08:41 PM Re: Blood Trailing deer. [Re: BSK]
nodog
4 Point


Registered: 08/12/12
Posts: 297
Loc: Ohio

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 Originally Posted By: BSK
nodogs,

I've seen amazing success rates with the use of blood-trailing dogs.


There are something aren't they, it's just amazing. I think everyone should experience the thrill once in a life time. It's like nothing else seeing a dog like that work.

I remember the first time I heard his bark change when he knew he was on it, like a rocket blasted off in front of me while I was holding the leash. Better than a fire works display. People really can't grasp it till they see it first hand. Just beautiful.
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#3285163 - 07/07/13 08:58 PM Re: Blood Trailing deer. [Re: BSK]
nodog
4 Point


Registered: 08/12/12
Posts: 297
Loc: Ohio

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 Originally Posted By: BSK
 Originally Posted By: JCDEERMAN
As I do with all deer whether I see them drop or not, I attempted to look for blood along the path he took. No blood found, but followed his tracks and turned over leaves right to him. This keeps me "in tune". I think this should be good practice for everyone. After numerous times doing this, one day it will pay off when you NEED all of that self-taught experience.


I can't agree more with this. Even if you know exactly where a deer is, practice blood-trailing at every opportunity. Blood-trailing is one of those skills you can never practice enough. That kind of relentless practice will pay off huge some day.

Thrills the soul!
_________________________
Hello

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#3285318 - 07/08/13 05:11 AM Re: Blood Trailing deer. [Re: nodog]
102
10 Point


Registered: 08/01/02
Posts: 4047
Loc: Tennessee

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Last year, early October, I actually had on coveralls. It was cool.
I did not expect to be wearing these this early and had not "refreshed" my memory on affected accuracy.

I was unzipped for cooling by ten AM and had a buck wander into range.

As I drew the buck made a quick hop that caused me to contort and caused my bow string to catch the zipper on my coveralls.
Needless to say, the arrow went WAY off course and entered the deer back in the ham, angling forward exiting the intestines. Made me sick.

I knew the deer was dead, and knew I had to leave it.

Just before dark, and against my better judgement, (about 8 hours after the shot)I took up the blood trail and jumped the deer. I was hunting close to home and already had a dog for the next day if needed so I pushed when I knew I should probably have waited.

After the jump I went home.

Next day my buddy brought his dog on a leash.

Walked RIGHT TO the dead deer.

Meat was fine.

The total distance traveled before the jump was about 100 yards. Had I left it alone till next morning I would have found this deer there, in its' first bed.
Instead, the dog had to find it 300 yards down the trail (no blood) where I may not have found it in time to salvage the meat.

The problem I have with dogs is that they are rather difficult to haul around on out of town trips. And I refuse to leave a dog penned up all the time. Especially when it is hot. And often times I hunt when it is hot (one of my biggest bucks was killed in Illinois on a record breaking November 86 degree day)


Edited by 102 (07/08/13 05:13 AM)
_________________________
God, Family, Job, Bowhunting
Luck is where Opportunity and Preparation MEET!
When in doubt...back out!
SCAPAS.stay calm and pick a spot.

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#3285539 - 07/08/13 10:30 AM Re: Blood Trailing deer. [Re: 102]
Mike Belt
TnDeer Old Timer
16 Point


Registered: 03/26/99
Posts: 17890
Loc: Lakeland, Tn.

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For those that prefer to blood trail....Would you rather a deer drop on the spot or that it runs out of sight leaving a blood trail? I love blood trailing deer but the problem is that in almost every instance I can think of the deer ran farther away rather than towards where I was parked making for a much harder, longer job of dragging.

I also agree that looking for a blood trail or any signs the deer made on his death run (even when the downed deer is in sight) is good practice. I always do that rather than just walking straight to the downed deer.
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#3285549 - 07/08/13 10:42 AM Re: Blood Trailing deer. [Re: Mike Belt]
DirtyBear0311
8 Point


Registered: 09/01/12
Posts: 1632
Loc: Milan, TN

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 Originally Posted By: Mike Belt
For those that prefer to blood trail....Would you rather a deer drop on the spot or that it runs out of sight leaving a blood trail? I love blood trailing deer but the problem is that in almost every instance I can think of the deer ran farther away rather than towards where I was parked making for a much harder, longer job of dragging.

I also agree that looking for a blood trail or any signs the deer made on his death run (even when the downed deer is in sight) is good practice. I always do that rather than just walking straight to the downed deer.




I believe that I would still prefer to trail despite the extra effort of the drag. I figure that its a small price to pay if just a bit of work for a great thrill and the chance to gain more knowledge.
_________________________
Semper Fi

Just because it's bad-a** don't mean it's a good idea.


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#3285600 - 07/08/13 11:40 AM Re: Blood Trailing deer. [Re: Mike Belt]
BSK
Jerkasourous of the non-typical kind
Non-Typical


Registered: 03/11/99
Posts: 65411
Loc: Nashville, TN

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 Originally Posted By: Mike Belt
For those that prefer to blood trail....Would you rather a deer drop on the spot or that it runs out of sight leaving a blood trail? I love blood trailing deer but the problem is that in almost every instance I can think of the deer ran farther away rather than towards where I was parked making for a much harder, longer job of dragging.


I only attempt certain "knockdown" shots (primarily the high shoulder shot) when 1) I'm using a weapon that can easily produce that effect (has the speed and impact power); and 2) the deer is standing still and broadside. All other shots--no matter the weapon--are targeted for a double-lung hit, which often doesn't produce a knockdown.
_________________________
"Know where you stand, and stand there" --Jesuit Father Daniel Berrigan

"There is no reasoning someone out of a position he has not reasoned himself into." --Clive James

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#3285708 - 07/08/13 01:50 PM Re: Blood Trailing deer. [Re: BSK]
DirtyBear0311
8 Point


Registered: 09/01/12
Posts: 1632
Loc: Milan, TN

Offline
 Originally Posted By: BSK
 Originally Posted By: Mike Belt
For those that prefer to blood trail....Would you rather a deer drop on the spot or that it runs out of sight leaving a blood trail? I love blood trailing deer but the problem is that in almost every instance I can think of the deer ran farther away rather than towards where I was parked making for a much harder, longer job of dragging.


I only attempt certain "knockdown" shots (primarily the high shoulder shot) when 1) I'm using a weapon that can easily produce that effect (has the speed and impact power); and 2) the deer is standing still and broadside. All other shots--no matter the weapon--are targeted for a double-lung hit, which often doesn't produce a knockdown.



What type of a weapon would produce that hit? Would a faster/lighter controlled expansion bullet do it or would it need to be a slower, heavier bullet?
_________________________
Semper Fi

Just because it's bad-a** don't mean it's a good idea.


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