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#3100575 - 12/29/12 08:10 PM Missouri elk staying put for now
Doskil
6 Point


Registered: 09/23/07
Posts: 720
Loc: NC USA

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http://www.rmef.org/HowToHelp/Volunteer/VolunteerNews/MO_ElkProgram.aspx
 Quote:

The 346-square-mile elk zone (221,000 acres) is located in the Ozark Mountains and encompasses some of Missouri’s most wild and beautiful country.


Interesting MO is trying to restore elk on an area about 1/3rd the size of TN's elk range

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#3101292 - 12/30/12 11:04 AM Re: Missouri elk staying put for now [Re: Doskil]
AT Hiker
6 Point


Registered: 07/03/11
Posts: 793
Loc: Clarksville, Tennessee

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Cool info...I honestly did not know MO was doing this. Also neat that KY has plenty of Elk to share.
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#3107035 - 01/03/13 04:35 AM Re: Missouri elk staying put for now [Re: AT Hiker]
Locksley
16 Point


Registered: 10/23/01
Posts: 19679
Loc: Antioch TN

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 Originally Posted By: AT Hiker
Cool info...I honestly did not know MO was doing this. Also neat that KY has plenty of Elk to share.


Missouri elk WERE the first Elk in the south to be restocked.
_________________________
To know wisdom and instruction; to perceive the words of understanding;"The greatest pain a man can suffer is to have knowledge of much, and power over nothing" - Herodotus

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#3107135 - 01/03/13 06:49 AM Re: Missouri elk staying put for now [Re: Locksley]
jar
4 Point


Registered: 08/06/12
Posts: 297
Loc: tn, rutherford county

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They trap some elk closre to my cousins house in Eastern KY. Last year he was given a nuisance cow elk permit for late Jan. because the elk are doing so well in the county where he lives. I was with him when he shot a mature cow elk the first morning. Im waiting to hear about this year, he says we will get them by the middle of Jan. The tags are for land owners in a small part of the county.
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#3109680 - 01/04/13 07:40 PM Re: Missouri elk staying put for now [Re: jar]
LanceS4803
6 Point


Registered: 12/04/10
Posts: 767
Loc: Middle TN

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Apparently elk ranged throughout TN and MO.

I wonder when elk finally left the lower Middle TN area?
We have Elkton in TN and Elkmont just across the border in AL.
_________________________
To a deer, every human is a stump.
To a turkey, every stump is a human.

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#3109721 - 01/04/13 08:03 PM Re: Missouri elk staying put for now [Re: LanceS4803]
cecil30-30
16 Point


Registered: 12/05/06
Posts: 13991
Loc: Morgan Co

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 Originally Posted By: LanceS4803
Apparently elk ranged throughout TN and MO.

I wonder when elk finally left the lower Middle TN area?
We have Elkton in TN and Elkmont just across the border in AL.
I don't think they left,I think they was hunted out.
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#3110999 - 01/05/13 08:56 PM Re: Missouri elk staying put for now [Re: cecil30-30]
LanceS4803
6 Point


Registered: 12/04/10
Posts: 767
Loc: Middle TN

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When would that have been?
Early 1800s?
_________________________
To a deer, every human is a stump.
To a turkey, every stump is a human.

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#3111130 - 01/05/13 10:02 PM Re: Missouri elk staying put for now [Re: LanceS4803]
cecil30-30
16 Point


Registered: 12/05/06
Posts: 13991
Loc: Morgan Co

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 Originally Posted By: LanceS4803
1. How long has it been since elk roamed wild in the state of Tennessee?
The last historical record of an elk being sighted in Tennessee was in 1865 when one was reported to be killed in Obion County.


http://www.tennessee.gov/twra/elkquestions.html
_________________________
The beauty of the second amendment is that it will not be needed until they try to take it." -Thomas Jefferson


Ban Liberals!!! Save America!!!!

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#3111368 - 01/06/13 09:10 AM Re: Missouri elk staying put for now [Re: cecil30-30]
Locksley
16 Point


Registered: 10/23/01
Posts: 19679
Loc: Antioch TN

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 Originally Posted By: cecil30-30
 Originally Posted By: LanceS4803
1. How long has it been since elk roamed wild in the state of Tennessee?
The last historical record of an elk being sighted in Tennessee was in 1865 when one was reported to be killed in Obion County.


http://www.tennessee.gov/twra/elkquestions.html


Elk once roamed the southern Appalachian Mountains and elsewhere in the eastern United States. They were eliminated from the region by over-hunting and loss of habitat. The last elk in North Carolina was believed to have been killed in the late 1700s.

In Tennessee, the last elk was killed in the mid-1800s. By 1900, the population of elk in North America dropped to the point that hunting groups and other conservation organizations became concerned the species was headed for extinction.


http://smokiesinformation.org/nature-wildlife/elk


Elk killed in Tennesse for first time since 1865
By Bryan Brasher on October 22, 2009

Tennessee's first elk hunt in nearly 150 years is over, and it can only be declared a smashing success.

The hunt came to an end late Tuesday afternoon when Franklin, Tenn., resident Tami Miller (pictured) took the fifth and final elk at the North Cumberland Wildlife Management Area. Miller's elk weighed more than 700 pounds with a 5x6 antler rack.

Four other elk were taken as follows:

http://blogs.commercialappeal.com/outdoo...since-1865.html


The Eastern Elk was larger than its western cousins. A full-grown bull could weigh up to 1000 pounds, stand 50-60 inches tall at the shoulder, and carry a rack of antlers six feet in length.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_elk


There may be more remaining of the eastern elk than old skeletons. In 1905, 18 elk were introduced to Fiordland National Park in New Zealand—a gift from Theodore Roosevelt. The elk were survivors of an original shipment of 20, half of which came from Yellowstone National Park and half from an Indian game reserve in Brookfield, Massachusetts, owned by H.E. Richardson. The latter are believed to be Eastern elk captured in northern Minnesota by Native Americans. The possible Eastern elk bloodline might explain some unusual characteristics he has seen in New Zealand elk, such as "bifurcated" antlers in which the dagger, or fourth point, forks at the tip.[10]
However, the likelihood of a pure bloodline is very low. Even though the animal population had successfully adapted to the harsh terrain, several factors likely contributed to a dilution of the pure gene pool. To wit, removal of protection in 1935; the crossbreeding with Red Deer that spread into the area; the gazetting of the Fiordland region as a National park in 1952; and the resulting status of the Elk and all introduced game species being relegated to that of noxious animals, or pests, by the government agencies of the time; has seen the wild herd go into decline. Today that herd is but a shadow of its former self, being comprised now only of crossbreeds of varying degree that have defied the efforts of government agencies to exterminate or remove them from Fiordland.[11]
Eastern elk could have also hung on in the extensive forests of Ontario. While evidence is sketchy, numerous people reported seeing a band of elk near Sault Ste. Marie in the early 1980s. These elk could be of eastern origin—and could still exist in the wilds of Ontario.[10]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_elk

Elk once numbered in the millions and occupied habitats spanning most of North America. Unfortunately, shrinking habitat and overhunting reduced populations to a few persistent herds in the mountainous West. Had the elk not been remarkably adaptable, it might now be extinct.

The eastern elk (Cerrus elaphus canadensis) lived in eastern boreal and hardwood forests. This was the subspecies native to Arkansas, though historical records indicate it persisted no later than the 1840s. It is now extinct.

The U.S. Forest Service introduced Rocky Mountain elk (Cersus elaphus nelsoni) in Franklin County's Black Mountain Refuge in 1933. Three bulls and eight cows from Wichita National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma were released. The population grew to 125 by 1948, but by then, wildlife biologists were concerned about the herd's future. The herd increased to an estimated 200 by the mid 1950s and then vanished.

No one knows for sure what caused these elk to disappear. Some speculate that illegal hunting, natural mortality and shrinkage of suitable range through natural ecological succession eventually resulted in their extermination.

In 1981, the Game & Fish Commission, in cooperation with private citizens and the National Park Service, initiated another elk restoration project in the Ozark Mountains of northwest Arkansas. Between 1981 and 1985, 112 elk from Colorado and Nebraska were released at five sites near Pruitt in Newton County. All release sites were on or adjacent Buffalo National River lands. Some elk were ear-tagged and tested for diseases such as brucellosis and leptospirosis prior to release.

The Game & Fish Commission and Park Service monitor elk using field observations, helicopter counts and, in recent years, thermal infrared sensing equipment. Elk have been reported in Washington, Carroll, Boone, Marion, Newton, Searcy, Stone, Conway, Pope, Van Buren and Faulkner counties, but most of the approximately 350 elk in the Arkansas herd occur along 67 miles of the upper and middle Buffalo National River corridor in Newton and Searcy counties, primarily on National Park Service land.

Arkansas elk range covers approximately 225,000 acres. Gene Rush/Buffalo River Wildlife Management Area, which borders Park Service property along the river, is included in this area, and elk are also found seasonally on surrounding private lands. A small breeding population is thought to be established on private land in southwest Boone and southeast Carroll counties.

Use by elk of national forest lands along the Richland Creek drainage in Searcy County appears to be seasonal. The few elk seen elsewhere in the state are considered transients.

Each year since 1991, biologists in helicopters have counted elk along the Buffalo River corridor and in some private land areas. Seventy-six elk were counted in 1991, 144 in 1992, 142 in 1993 and 140 in 1994. Calf/cow ratios have ranged from 40 to 49 calves per 100 cows, which suggests adequate reproduction. Bull/cow ratios have ranged from 39 to 54 antlered bulls per 100 cows, which compares favorably with data on established elk herds in some western states.

A thermal infrared sensing project initiated in 1994 provides more precise information on elk numbers and distribution. In February and March 1994, 312 elk were found on national park land, AG&FC land and adjacent private lands along the Buffalo River corridor between Boxley and the Highway 65 bridge at Silver Hill. The survey area included all areas normally surveyed by helicopter and additional private and national forest lands where elk were reported in recent years.

Fifty-five elk deaths were documented between 1981 and 1993. Poaching (32 percent) and disease (31 percent) are primary factors in these losses.

Without suitable habitat, elk would soon disappear from Arkansas. Realizing this, state, federal and private interests have worked together to expand and improve elk habitat along the Buffalo River.

Since 1992, the Game & Fish Commission, cooperating with the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, has done extensive habitat improvement work on 17,652-acre Gene Rush/Buffalo River WMA. As a result, elk use of the WMA has increased recently, and more habitat work is planned for the future.

The National Park Service also wants to ensure the future of the elk herd. Their efforts to create and maintain beneficial elk habitat along the Buffalo have included conducting prescribed burns, maintaining hay fields and establishing native grass openings.

Based on available habitat along the middle and lower Buffalo, it seems likely elk will expand their current range toward the mouth of the river. Suitable range also exists on private lands in the region, but private landowners may not tolerate extensive elk use. A few are already complaining.

Interest in Arkansas elk increases each year. More and more Arkansans visit the Buffalo River area to see and photograph these magnificent animals, especially in late September and early October when elk are breeding. The herd will never be large compared to herds in western states, but these elk provide unique wildlife watching opportunities, and those who come to see them provide additional tourist revenue for state and local economies.

An elk program team composed of Game & Fish and National Park Service staff recently drafted an elk management plan. Their recommendations include developing and funding future habitat improvement and research projects, formulating plans for a limited elk hunting program in the future, developing a statewide nuisance elk policy, developing public elk viewing sites and assessing sites for herd expansion onto public lands.

This article courtesy Arkansas Wildlife Magazine

http://www.centuryinter.net/nacent/ozark/elk.html


Edited by Locksley (01/06/13 09:37 AM)
_________________________
To know wisdom and instruction; to perceive the words of understanding;"The greatest pain a man can suffer is to have knowledge of much, and power over nothing" - Herodotus

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#3113342 - 01/07/13 07:55 PM Re: Missouri elk staying put for now [Re: Locksley]
LanceS4803
6 Point


Registered: 12/04/10
Posts: 767
Loc: Middle TN

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Excellent info! Thank yu very much.
I recall Utah was trading elk for turkeys to Southern states.
_________________________
To a deer, every human is a stump.
To a turkey, every stump is a human.

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