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#305184 - 07/19/07 09:25 AM Baiting vs. Food Plots
grundsow
4 Point


Registered: 04/03/01
Posts: 283
Loc: Berks County, PA

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I don't know if baiting for hunting purposes is legal in Tenn or not. But how do y'all (vernacular intentional ) view food plots? Considering seed is sold in 1/4-acre plot size and there is no intention to harvest the planted "crops", and terms like "hunting plot" & "killing plot" are thrown around readily…

Are wildlife food plots "baiting" or not?

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#305213 - 07/19/07 09:41 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: grundsow]
TOW
10 Point


Registered: 06/29/05
Posts: 4196
Loc: Back 40

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IMHO - Baiting is a poor man's food plot....

There is not a whole lot of difference in taking something in for the deer to eat right now as opposed to bringing something in, plant it and the deer eat it later.

Both are food attractants..
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#305272 - 07/19/07 10:14 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: TOW]
ferg
Spider
16 Point


Registered: 07/29/04
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Loc: At the TNDeer shirt factory %^...

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Not again - but - to me - one is leagle to hunt over and one is not in Tn - very basic difference, very clear.

ferg....
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#305275 - 07/19/07 10:16 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: TOW]
BSK
Jerkasourous of the non-typical kind
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Registered: 03/11/99
Posts: 64229
Loc: Nashville, TN

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grundsow,

That is common debate across the country. Generally, those who do not own property or are not allowed to plant food plots complain food plots are bait. Those who use food plots, and have some real-world experience with them, will say they are not bait.

But much depends on how you define "bait." Without question, very small food plots (1/3-acre or less) certainly are designed to "draw deer" instead of provide better nutrition (unless you have many of these small plots). So in intent, very small plots are created for the same reason bait piles are established--to draw deer to a specific location. However, food plots do not suffer from many of the biological problems associated with bait piles.

So it really comes down to perspective and intent. Can small food plots be considered "baiting?" When drawing deer to a specific small location is the intent, then yes it can be considered "baiting" from a philosophical standpoint. However, biologically there are some real differences in deer utilization. But in intent, they can be the same.
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"Know where you stand, and stand there" --Jesuit Father Daniel Berrigan

"There is no reasoning someone out of a position he has not reasoned himself into." --Clive James

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#305289 - 07/19/07 10:27 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: BSK]
strutandrut
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Registered: 07/03/06
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Loc: signal mountain

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here we go again
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#305361 - 07/19/07 11:38 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: BSK]
grundsow
4 Point


Registered: 04/03/01
Posts: 283
Loc: Berks County, PA

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Thanks guys, would like to hear more perspective from out of state. Here in PA it’s too heated to discuss with much progress at understanding one another. I believe other states allow hunting over supplemental feeding/bait, and QDMA endorses providing salt/minerals for deer.

PA basically defines “bait” this way. It must be food/minerals (scents, calls & decoys are legal), and it must have been “placed” (not planted). So standing corn/grain is legal to hunt over. However, if one were to bush-hog it down and leave the food lay, or say plow up some turnips and leave them lay, then it would be illegal to hunt over. IMO that’s ridiculous.

Interestingly, “deer baiting” has been made temporarily LEGAL in certain “suburban/urban” zones in an effort to reduce deer density. And now there is a proposal to allow “corn baiting” for all game in all of PA. This has people up in arms.

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#305388 - 07/19/07 11:55 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: grundsow]
BSK
Jerkasourous of the non-typical kind
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Registered: 03/11/99
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From a legal standpoint, I personally would like to see bait defined by the simple rule: "If it grows out of the ground, it is not bait. If it is poured on the ground, it is bait." However, state's are going to have differing opinions on what is bait. In TN, I believe you can bush-hog standing corn. Also in TN, you can use salt/mineral licks, but only if the product is at least 50% salt. I also believe it can not have any food source in it (like corn mixed with the mineral/salt [but someone correct me if I'm wrong about that]).

When it comes to legalized baiting, ethically I don't have a problem with it. However, biologically I have a huge problem with it. The chances for the spread of disease at bait piles is very high. In addition, I'm concerned about the spread of CWD at salt licks. Salt will kill all living organisms (bacteria, viruses) but there is a possibility it could actually strengthen the CWD prion.
_________________________
"Know where you stand, and stand there" --Jesuit Father Daniel Berrigan

"There is no reasoning someone out of a position he has not reasoned himself into." --Clive James

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#305575 - 07/19/07 02:08 PM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: BSK]
grundsow
4 Point


Registered: 04/03/01
Posts: 283
Loc: Berks County, PA

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A pile of shelled corn is somehow disturbing to me, but I have trouble then defending my bird feeder.

The disease transmission factor at “feeder” sites has me concerned. However, I wonder how justified that concern is considering concentrated deer activity at licking branches, scrapes, and signpost rubs. And just the natural social behavior of deer to yard-up overwinter (at least in the north), and yearling buck dispersal ranges of like 5 to 50 miles from birth range? How significant is a feed site in the big picture, in terms of being a disease vector?

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#305794 - 07/19/07 05:58 PM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: grundsow]
backstraps
12 Point


Registered: 09/19/03
Posts: 6797
Loc: NE Tennessee

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BSk, you make some good points....I can agree with if it grows out of the ground it isnt bait...if it is poured out, it is bait...but I would also like to think if it grows out of the ground and is less than say 3-5 acre plot it is bait...because given the right deer population and time of year, an acre of foilage wont last long as primary source of food. As for the comment made by another user people who doesnt have land is against fod plots...not true I have several hundred acres to hunt. I have food plots, due to the fact they are legal...but still in my mind they are no different than having a broadcast feeder with other suppliments. Millet, corn, etc
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#306508 - 07/20/07 07:05 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: grundsow]
BSK
Jerkasourous of the non-typical kind
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Registered: 03/11/99
Posts: 64229
Loc: Nashville, TN

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 Originally Posted By: grundsow
A pile of shelled corn is somehow disturbing to me, but I have trouble then defending my bird feeder.

The disease transmission factor at “feeder” sites has me concerned. However, I wonder how justified that concern is considering concentrated deer activity at licking branches, scrapes, and signpost rubs. And just the natural social behavior of deer to yard-up overwinter (at least in the north), and yearling buck dispersal ranges of like 5 to 50 miles from birth range? How significant is a feed site in the big picture, in terms of being a disease vector?


Actually, there are some very nasty avian diseases being spread by backyard bird feeders.

Without question, deer have social behaviors that bring body fluids into contact. But why would we want to increases those through feeders? I find it very interesting that the Southeast Wildlife Disease Study Group believes that the two greatest threats to wildlife in America are: 1) the translocation of wildlife (transporting wildlife from place to place); and 2) the artificial feeding of wildlife. Both processes greatly increase the risk of disease spread.

Again, diseases can and will spread naturally, but why would we want to increase those risks? In addition, the artifical feeding of wildlife may be causing major changes in wildlife utilization of the habitat and causing all sorts of other problems. And there is the problems associated with molds and diseases that grow on the feed. Some of the byproducts of those molds are very nasty and can be deadly to wildlife.

Below is a link to one of the most comprehensive studies available on the positive and negative effects of artificial feeding:

http://wildlife1.usask.ca/wildlife_health_topics/wildlife_baiting.pdf
_________________________
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"There is no reasoning someone out of a position he has not reasoned himself into." --Clive James

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