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#305184 - 07/19/07 09:25 AM Baiting vs. Food Plots
grundsow
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Registered: 04/03/01
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Loc: Berks County, PA

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I don't know if baiting for hunting purposes is legal in Tenn or not. But how do y'all (vernacular intentional ) view food plots? Considering seed is sold in 1/4-acre plot size and there is no intention to harvest the planted "crops", and terms like "hunting plot" & "killing plot" are thrown around readily…

Are wildlife food plots "baiting" or not?

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#305213 - 07/19/07 09:41 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: grundsow]
TOW
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IMHO - Baiting is a poor man's food plot....

There is not a whole lot of difference in taking something in for the deer to eat right now as opposed to bringing something in, plant it and the deer eat it later.

Both are food attractants..
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#305272 - 07/19/07 10:14 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: TOW]
ferg
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Not again - but - to me - one is leagle to hunt over and one is not in Tn - very basic difference, very clear.

ferg....
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#305275 - 07/19/07 10:16 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: TOW]
BSK
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grundsow,

That is common debate across the country. Generally, those who do not own property or are not allowed to plant food plots complain food plots are bait. Those who use food plots, and have some real-world experience with them, will say they are not bait.

But much depends on how you define "bait." Without question, very small food plots (1/3-acre or less) certainly are designed to "draw deer" instead of provide better nutrition (unless you have many of these small plots). So in intent, very small plots are created for the same reason bait piles are established--to draw deer to a specific location. However, food plots do not suffer from many of the biological problems associated with bait piles.

So it really comes down to perspective and intent. Can small food plots be considered "baiting?" When drawing deer to a specific small location is the intent, then yes it can be considered "baiting" from a philosophical standpoint. However, biologically there are some real differences in deer utilization. But in intent, they can be the same.
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#305289 - 07/19/07 10:27 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: BSK]
strutandrut
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Registered: 07/03/06
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here we go again
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#305361 - 07/19/07 11:38 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: BSK]
grundsow
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Registered: 04/03/01
Posts: 284
Loc: Berks County, PA

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Thanks guys, would like to hear more perspective from out of state. Here in PA it’s too heated to discuss with much progress at understanding one another. I believe other states allow hunting over supplemental feeding/bait, and QDMA endorses providing salt/minerals for deer.

PA basically defines “bait” this way. It must be food/minerals (scents, calls & decoys are legal), and it must have been “placed” (not planted). So standing corn/grain is legal to hunt over. However, if one were to bush-hog it down and leave the food lay, or say plow up some turnips and leave them lay, then it would be illegal to hunt over. IMO that’s ridiculous.

Interestingly, “deer baiting” has been made temporarily LEGAL in certain “suburban/urban” zones in an effort to reduce deer density. And now there is a proposal to allow “corn baiting” for all game in all of PA. This has people up in arms.

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#305388 - 07/19/07 11:55 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: grundsow]
BSK
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From a legal standpoint, I personally would like to see bait defined by the simple rule: "If it grows out of the ground, it is not bait. If it is poured on the ground, it is bait." However, state's are going to have differing opinions on what is bait. In TN, I believe you can bush-hog standing corn. Also in TN, you can use salt/mineral licks, but only if the product is at least 50% salt. I also believe it can not have any food source in it (like corn mixed with the mineral/salt [but someone correct me if I'm wrong about that]).

When it comes to legalized baiting, ethically I don't have a problem with it. However, biologically I have a huge problem with it. The chances for the spread of disease at bait piles is very high. In addition, I'm concerned about the spread of CWD at salt licks. Salt will kill all living organisms (bacteria, viruses) but there is a possibility it could actually strengthen the CWD prion.
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#305575 - 07/19/07 02:08 PM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: BSK]
grundsow
4 Point


Registered: 04/03/01
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A pile of shelled corn is somehow disturbing to me, but I have trouble then defending my bird feeder.

The disease transmission factor at “feeder” sites has me concerned. However, I wonder how justified that concern is considering concentrated deer activity at licking branches, scrapes, and signpost rubs. And just the natural social behavior of deer to yard-up overwinter (at least in the north), and yearling buck dispersal ranges of like 5 to 50 miles from birth range? How significant is a feed site in the big picture, in terms of being a disease vector?

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#305794 - 07/19/07 05:58 PM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: grundsow]
backstraps
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Registered: 09/19/03
Posts: 6934
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BSk, you make some good points....I can agree with if it grows out of the ground it isnt bait...if it is poured out, it is bait...but I would also like to think if it grows out of the ground and is less than say 3-5 acre plot it is bait...because given the right deer population and time of year, an acre of foilage wont last long as primary source of food. As for the comment made by another user people who doesnt have land is against fod plots...not true I have several hundred acres to hunt. I have food plots, due to the fact they are legal...but still in my mind they are no different than having a broadcast feeder with other suppliments. Millet, corn, etc
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#306508 - 07/20/07 07:05 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: grundsow]
BSK
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 Originally Posted By: grundsow
A pile of shelled corn is somehow disturbing to me, but I have trouble then defending my bird feeder.

The disease transmission factor at “feeder” sites has me concerned. However, I wonder how justified that concern is considering concentrated deer activity at licking branches, scrapes, and signpost rubs. And just the natural social behavior of deer to yard-up overwinter (at least in the north), and yearling buck dispersal ranges of like 5 to 50 miles from birth range? How significant is a feed site in the big picture, in terms of being a disease vector?


Actually, there are some very nasty avian diseases being spread by backyard bird feeders.

Without question, deer have social behaviors that bring body fluids into contact. But why would we want to increases those through feeders? I find it very interesting that the Southeast Wildlife Disease Study Group believes that the two greatest threats to wildlife in America are: 1) the translocation of wildlife (transporting wildlife from place to place); and 2) the artificial feeding of wildlife. Both processes greatly increase the risk of disease spread.

Again, diseases can and will spread naturally, but why would we want to increase those risks? In addition, the artifical feeding of wildlife may be causing major changes in wildlife utilization of the habitat and causing all sorts of other problems. And there is the problems associated with molds and diseases that grow on the feed. Some of the byproducts of those molds are very nasty and can be deadly to wildlife.

Below is a link to one of the most comprehensive studies available on the positive and negative effects of artificial feeding:

http://wildlife1.usask.ca/wildlife_health_topics/wildlife_baiting.pdf
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#307164 - 07/20/07 07:11 PM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: backstraps]
deerchaser007
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Registered: 12/17/02
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 Originally Posted By: backstraps
BSk, you make some good points....I can agree with if it grows out of the ground it isnt bait...if it is poured out, it is bait...but I would also like to think if it grows out of the ground and is less than say 3-5 acre plot it is bait...because given the right deer population and time of year, an acre of foilage wont last long as primary source of food. As for the comment made by another user people who doesnt have land is against fod plots...not true I have several hundred acres to hunt. I have food plots, due to the fact they are legal...but still in my mind they are no different than having a broadcast feeder with other suppliments. Millet, corn, etc



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#308273 - 07/21/07 11:28 PM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: BSK]
Stalker
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Registered: 12/06/04
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Seems to me the disease factor is null and void...here is why...

It is illegal to hunt over bait, feeders, food, etc. All of which (from what I am understanding) increase the risk of disease spread (this used as PART of why they make rules for not hunting over bait).

However a person could feed deer and other wildlife all year long in TN as long as all of it is removed 10 days before hunting takes place. So what is the difference in feeding (baiting) the last few months when they have been fed all year anyway?

I thought that the main reasons for not allowing baiting stemed from the "fair chase" mentality and food plots were the loop hole in the law because it would be too hard to define agricultural practices when one man is hunting over a field he planted for hunting and another man is hunting over a field planted by a farmer...what if the hunter over the "food plot" was the farmer? or is a farmer?
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#308369 - 07/22/07 07:58 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: Stalker]
BSK
Jerkasourous of the non-typical kind
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Registered: 03/11/99
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Stalker,

You are correct that mosr baiting laws in the past have involved the issue of "fair chase." However, you will see more and more states passing no baiting or feeding laws over health concerns in the near future. With nasty new contagious diseases popping up, state agencies are growing rightfully concerned about disease spread issues.
_________________________
"Know where you stand, and stand there" --Jesuit Father Daniel Berrigan

"There is no reasoning someone out of a position he has not reasoned himself into." --Clive James

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#308429 - 07/22/07 09:45 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: BSK]
Stalker
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Registered: 12/06/04
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 Originally Posted By: BSK
Stalker,

You are correct that mosr baiting laws in the past have involved the issue of "fair chase." However, you will see more and more states passing no baiting or feeding laws over health concerns in the near future. With nasty new contagious diseases popping up, state agencies are growing rightfully concerned about disease spread issues.


So, how do you think the future laws will view a person who has feeders filled with corn from January (after season ends) thru 3 weeks from bow season and has 1 acre sized food plots (2 on 120 acres) and six large mieral lick locations? Who manages the land, clearing brush, mowing, feeding, seeding, uses trail cams to verify progress, and works the land every couple weeks or so all year. This is what I do. I ensure that I am following the laws on baiting and if my feeders are not empty 15 days out from bow season I remove them completely?


Edited by Stalker (07/22/07 09:48 AM)
Edit Reason: spelling
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#308476 - 07/22/07 10:14 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: strutandrut]
pety221
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Registered: 02/18/06
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 Originally Posted By: strutandrut
here we go again

same crap diffrent day
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#308484 - 07/22/07 10:26 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: Stalker]
BSK
Jerkasourous of the non-typical kind
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Registered: 03/11/99
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 Originally Posted By: Stalker
 Originally Posted By: BSK
Stalker,

You are correct that mosr baiting laws in the past have involved the issue of "fair chase." However, you will see more and more states passing no baiting or feeding laws over health concerns in the near future. With nasty new contagious diseases popping up, state agencies are growing rightfully concerned about disease spread issues.


So, how do you think the future laws will view a person who has feeders filled with corn from January (after season ends) thru 3 weeks from bow season and has 1 acre sized food plots (2 on 120 acres) and six large mieral lick locations? Who manages the land, clearing brush, mowing, feeding, seeding, uses trail cams to verify progress, and works the land every couple weeks or so all year. This is what I do. I ensure that I am following the laws on baiting and if my feeders are not empty 15 days out from bow season I remove them completely?


They will simply pass no feeding and no baiting laws. Basically, grow it out of the ground, OK. Provide it out of a feeder, illegal.

_________________________
"Know where you stand, and stand there" --Jesuit Father Daniel Berrigan

"There is no reasoning someone out of a position he has not reasoned himself into." --Clive James

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#308671 - 07/22/07 02:32 PM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: pety221]
Stalker
8 Point


Registered: 12/06/04
Posts: 1468
Loc: Greene / Cocke County

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 Originally Posted By: pety221
 Originally Posted By: strutandrut
here we go again

same crap diffrent day


Its pretty easy not to get sick of it...do'nt get involved.
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#308673 - 07/22/07 02:34 PM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: grundsow]
Stalker
8 Point


Registered: 12/06/04
Posts: 1468
Loc: Greene / Cocke County

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Thanks BSK...for your time and input.
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#309710 - 07/23/07 11:17 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: BSK]
grundsow
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Registered: 04/03/01
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Loc: Berks County, PA

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 Quote:
I thought that the main reasons for not allowing baiting stemed from the "fair chase" mentality

Boone & Crockett Regulations clearly classify bait as “fair chase”. And, Pope & Young doesn’t reject it either.

 Quote:
Again, diseases can and will spread naturally, but why would we want to increase those risks? In addition, the artifical feeding of wildlife may be causing major changes in wildlife utilization of the habitat and causing all sorts of other problems. And there is the problems associated with molds and diseases that grow on the feed. Some of the byproducts of those molds are very nasty and can be deadly to wildlife.

Why then do you suppose QDMA has articles in support of supplemental feeding and/or baiting with salt/minerals, etc?

 Quote:
They will simply pass no feeding and no baiting laws. Basically, grow it out of the ground, OK. Provide it out of a feeder, illegal.

Again, if the idea is to prevent disease, why give food-plotters a free pass to concentrate deer? Why not do something like regulate SIZE of plot too, the same way bait pile size is sometimes regulated?

I don’t know, but I read that report and man it just seems like it’s difficult to draw any real conclusions. I mean, first of all baiting and supplemental feeding are lumped together, which seems to me to give baiting a bad rap by association.

And then the bad things about feeding appear to be more linked to overpopulation than feeding itself. Sure “feeding” could facilitate disease transmission, but isn’t high deer density a bigger issue?

For example, in the traditional deer hunting destination of northcentral PA, the overwinter density is often down into the single digits nowadays (based on infrared counts). Can those numbers really result in “dangerous concentrations” of deer around bait sites?

Also interesting to me was that the success rates of hunting over bait vs. without were conflicting. But meanwhile “sharpshooter” deer reduction services and Game Commission deer studies always use bait.

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#310913 - 07/24/07 07:21 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: grundsow]
BSK
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Boone & Crockett Regulations clearly classify bait as “fair chase”. And, Pope & Young doesn’t reject it either.

I'm really not interested in what B&C or P&Y have to say. However, I'm very interested in what the non-hunting public thinks, and they--no matter what study you look at--overwhelmingky dislike bait and believe it is unfair. The non-hunting public will decide our future (only 5% of the U.S. population hunts).


Why then do you suppose QDMA has articles in support of supplemental feeding and/or baiting with salt/minerals, etc?

Because in some situations, like the near desert environment of west and south TX, supplemental feeding is necessary to sustain a viable deer population. The carrying capacity of these environments fluctuates so drastically from year to year depending on rainfall. Other situations exist where supplemental feeding is the only way to produce a truly healthy deer population (Limited Potential [LP] habitat).

However, that said, I'm deeply opposed to any supplemental feeding unless absolutely necessary.

So far, disease problems have not been linked to salt licks. But the potential is there for CWD transmission at salt licks (but not other diseases due to the high saline content of the lick, which will kill all living organisms).


Again, if the idea is to prevent disease, why give food-plotters a free pass to concentrate deer? Why not do something like regulate SIZE of plot too, the same way bait pile size is sometimes regulated?

Because there is a huge difference in the way deer feed in a small plot than the way they feed at a feeder or bait pile. In a small food plot they are not placing their mouths directly into the same spot, while at a feeder or bait pile, every mouth is placed into the same location in rapid succession.


I don’t know, but I read that report and man it just seems like it’s difficult to draw any real conclusions.

Are you serious? I feel that report is about as damning as it can get concerning supplemental feeding and baiting. Different perspective I guess.


I mean, first of all baiting and supplemental feeding are lumped together, which seems to me to give baiting a bad rap by association.

Which it should. They are equally as dangerous.


And then the bad things about feeding appear to be more linked to overpopulation than feeding itself. Sure “feeding” could facilitate disease transmission, but isn’t high deer density a bigger issue?

Absolutely. It isn't just a disease issue. It is also a "misuse" issue. Many who supplementally feed do so for the wrong reasons and use poor judgement about the effect of the supplemental feeding. They do not recongnize the signs of the damage they are doing through increased population and encouraging that increased population to concetrate their feeding near and at the feeders.

Supplemental feeding and baiting are complex, multifaceted issues. But the scientific concensus is they are both bad, for various reasons. I would avoid them both. Outside of TX, I have never recommended supplemental feeding to a client. In fact, I try my best to discourage any feeding at all other than habitat improvements.
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#547278 - 01/02/08 02:01 PM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: BSK]
grundsow
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Registered: 04/03/01
Posts: 284
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 Originally Posted By: BSK
 Originally Posted By: grundsow
I mean, first of all baiting and supplemental feeding are lumped together, which seems to me to give baiting a bad rap by association.


Which it should. They are equally as dangerous.


Baiting vs. Feeding - I’d like to revisit this.

After the PGC recently made baiting legal in certain places, I began placing ear corn in front of some of my trailcams in winter after hunting season to see how deer would react. I figure it’s no different than the picked corn fields around here.

You’re telling me though, that you feel this is dangerous biologically?

I mean, I really don’t see larger groups of deer, and I’m not even sure if there are more frequent visits in front of my trailcams when I bait. They simply stay in front of the camera for a longer period of time affording me more pics.

Now I have an opportunity to hunt a new property within the area where hunting over bait is legal. PGC allows no more than 5-gallons of “bait” to be used at a time. I’ve been invited to hunt a small lot to try to reduce deer density. Flowers and shrubs are being eaten at someone’s house as well as the newly planted hardwoods in Tubex and even the evergreens on an adjacent farm now enrolled in some sort of conservation program.

Right now there is a group of about 10 deer that spend the day between a woodlot of about 2-acres or less (3,200 deer per forested sq. mile!!) and their “sanctuary” - an overgrown meadow about another acre or two in size. I don’t have access to the meadow or picked soybean and corn fields (and wouldn't know how to hunt them if I did), so my options are get the deer into the woods somehow where I can hang a treestand. I was thinking baiting.

BTW, haven’t you run baited trailcam surveys?

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#548323 - 01/03/08 08:55 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: ]
BSK
Jerkasourous of the non-typical kind
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 Originally Posted By: WhitetailSlayer
BSK - is putting out salt and or mineral licks or loose trace salt bad in your opinion? I understand completely what you are saying about baiting and supplemental feeding, but is there a need in our area (West & Middle TN) for this and does it have any benefits/consequences here????


That's a tough question to answer because of CWD. The high saline environment of a salt lick will kill most living organisms (infectious bacteria and viruses), but there is some theoretical possibility that a high saline environment may actually enhance the CWD prion. At this point that idea is only theoretical. It has not yet been shown that the CWD prion is being transmitted at salt licks. But it is something to consider.
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"Know where you stand, and stand there" --Jesuit Father Daniel Berrigan

"There is no reasoning someone out of a position he has not reasoned himself into." --Clive James

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#548485 - 01/03/08 11:59 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: ]
BSK
Jerkasourous of the non-typical kind
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Registered: 03/11/99
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 Originally Posted By: DUCK37101
Does baiting have a history of being harmful to deer in states where it is legal and if so can you tell me where the articles are that show this?


Duck37101,

Yes, there are known problems with baiting and supplemental feeding. Probably the best reference source I know of is the following PDF document. It is fairly lengthy, but I like it because it discusses many, many published research projects involving both the pros and cons of all forms of supplemental feeding, from trough feeders, to baiting, to food plots. I think it is a very balanced and unbiased report.

http://wildlife1.usask.ca/wildlife_health_topics/wildlife_baiting.pdf

In addition, although unpublished, at the Southeast Deer Study Group (annual scientific symposium concerning research on deer) a couple of years ago, the head of the Southeast Cooperative Disease Study Group gave a speach in which he stated that he believed the supplemental feeding of wildlife was the 2nd greatest threat to wildlife in America today (the #1 threat was the practice of relocating wildlife across long geographic distances for shooting preserves and breeding programs. This practice is the fastest way to spread contagious disease). He pointed out that they are seeing "unknown" disease cropping up where baiting is common. In addition, he pointed out that half of all bait piles they had tested in NC had high enough levels of aflatoxin (a toxin produced by mold that grows on cereal grains, especially corn) to be dangerous to animals.
_________________________
"Know where you stand, and stand there" --Jesuit Father Daniel Berrigan

"There is no reasoning someone out of a position he has not reasoned himself into." --Clive James

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#548605 - 01/03/08 02:31 PM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: BSK]
grundsow
4 Point


Registered: 04/03/01
Posts: 284
Loc: Berks County, PA

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 Quote:
He pointed out that they are seeing "unknown" disease cropping up where baiting is common. In addition, he pointed out that half of all bait piles they had tested in NC had high enough levels of aflatoxin (a toxin produced by mold that grows on cereal grains, especially corn) to be dangerous to animals.

Page 31 of the report on your link shows a so-called “bait” pile of shelled corn the size of a dump truck load. IMO that is feeding not baiting and I can see how such practices could result in mold contamination.

However, I don’t understand how a 5-gallon bucket of ear corn scattered about could really be considered dangerous.



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#548618 - 01/03/08 02:43 PM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: grundsow]
BSK
Jerkasourous of the non-typical kind
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A handful of corn infected with aflatixon could kill a number of animals. It only takes aflatoxin contamination of 20 parts per BILLION to kill a full-grown turkey.

In the winter, aflatoxin is a very low-risk problem, as the cold weather kills the mold. But in summer, corn can become dangerous for wildlife in a matter of a few days of exposure to hot, humid or rainy weather.
_________________________
"Know where you stand, and stand there" --Jesuit Father Daniel Berrigan

"There is no reasoning someone out of a position he has not reasoned himself into." --Clive James

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#548878 - 01/03/08 06:23 PM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: BSK]
Tennessee Todd
Communicates like Rad
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Registered: 03/12/99
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http://www.tele-bait.com
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#549140 - 01/03/08 08:22 PM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: BSK]
hard county
6 Point


Registered: 11/26/07
Posts: 558
Loc: hornsby tennessee

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 Originally Posted By: BSK
A handful of corn infected with aflatixon could kill a number of animals. It only takes aflatoxin contamination of 20 parts per BILLION to kill a full-grown turkey.

In the winter, aflatoxin is a very low-risk problem, as the cold weather kills the mold. But in summer, corn can become dangerous for wildlife in a matter of a few days of exposure to hot, humid or rainy weather.

What study shows this? of all the studies i have found 800 ppb was the lowest quantity of alfatoxin which affected deer, turkeys were around the same number.
also bush-hogged corn is illegal to hunt over
IMO alfatoxin is propaganda to keep the TWRA away from the very difficult issue of ethics.
I also find it funny that everyone wants to harp on alfatoxin in
the bagged corn baiting debate when alfatoxin is more prevalent in standing corn than in washed bagged corn.
And finally, when supplemental feeding is done right, corn is rarely used, (most opt for soybean meal, cottonseed meal or protein pelletts), piles on the ground are never used (I prefer a trough type feeder which i can protect from the weather) also I have the ability to clean the feeder and if needed remove all feed.
I also believe that suplemental feeding should be incorporated into a total habitat management program which would include food plots and selective harvest.
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#549491 - 01/04/08 07:41 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: hard county]
BSK
Jerkasourous of the non-typical kind
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 Originally Posted By: hard county
 Originally Posted By: BSK
A handful of corn infected with aflatixon could kill a number of animals. It only takes aflatoxin contamination of 20 parts per BILLION to kill a full-grown turkey.

In the winter, aflatoxin is a very low-risk problem, as the cold weather kills the mold. But in summer, corn can become dangerous for wildlife in a matter of a few days of exposure to hot, humid or rainy weather.

What study shows this? of all the studies i have found 800 ppb was the lowest quantity of alfatoxin which affected deer, turkeys were around the same number.


You must be reading the wrong stuff. Alfatoxin is far more deadly to birds than mammals. It can be lethal to turkey at 20 PPB.
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"There is no reasoning someone out of a position he has not reasoned himself into." --Clive James

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#549502 - 01/04/08 07:48 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: hard county]
BSK
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 Originally Posted By: hard county

also bush-hogged corn is illegal to hunt over


According to what TWRA personnel have posted on this site, that is not correct.



 Quote:
IMO alfatoxin is propaganda to keep the TWRA away from the very difficult issue of ethics.


I always find that those who fight the scientific truths about aflatixon are usually those with a vested interest. They want to bait and supplementally feed. They're looking for the "quick fix" answer to bigger bucks. I'm not the TWRA, but I strongly advise against both practices, baiting and supplemental feeding. They both are proven problems. I would love to see the TWRA outlaw the feeding of wildlife outside of a 100 yards from a occupied home. That would allow backyard bird feeding but not the trough feeding of wildlife.



 Quote:
I also find it funny that everyone wants to harp on alfatoxin in
the bagged corn baiting debate when alfatoxin is more prevalent in standing corn than in washed bagged corn.


That can be true, but the local Coops in my area don't sell bagged, washed whole-kernal corn. It is simply whatever the local farmers sell to them. And once you put corn out in the environment, mold growth can be immediate.



 Quote:
I also believe that suplemental feeding should be incorporated into a total habitat management program which would include food plots and selective harvest.


I STRONGLY disagree with that.
_________________________
"Know where you stand, and stand there" --Jesuit Father Daniel Berrigan

"There is no reasoning someone out of a position he has not reasoned himself into." --Clive James

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#549531 - 01/04/08 08:08 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: ]
BSK
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WhitetailSlayer,

Check out the Quality Deer Management Association's (QDMA's) website:

http://www.qdma.com/

The QDMA was started and is still run by wildlife biologists as a way of educating hunters about deer management.
_________________________
"Know where you stand, and stand there" --Jesuit Father Daniel Berrigan

"There is no reasoning someone out of a position he has not reasoned himself into." --Clive James

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#549631 - 01/04/08 09:14 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: BSK]
CopperHead77
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Registered: 08/20/07
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I heard somewhere that once corn is broken down, like cracked corn for instance,that it's less likely to be harmful. Anyone heard this?
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#550721 - 01/05/08 07:58 AM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: CopperHead77]
gbotts
Spike


Registered: 08/04/07
Posts: 81
Loc: scott county

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i dont know about the toxins in cracked corn, but i do know the nutrienal level in the corn starts to decrease as soon as the corn is cracked.
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#551145 - 01/05/08 06:56 PM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: gbotts]
holstonangler
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Registered: 02/25/06
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 Originally Posted By: gbotts
i dont know about the toxins in cracked corn, but i do know the nutrienal level in the corn starts to decrease as soon as the corn is cracked.


So its better for the deer to swallow it whole? \:\)

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#552047 - 01/06/08 06:00 PM Re: Baiting vs. Food Plots [Re: holstonangler]
gbotts
Spike


Registered: 08/04/07
Posts: 81
Loc: scott county

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yeah
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