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#1210299 - 03/02/09 12:57 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: gil1]
captain hook
10 Point


Registered: 11/20/07
Posts: 4340
Loc: Knoxville

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Thanks for the info gil1 and it makes sense for the applications you described.

Rods IMO should be flung, before they are purchased. Always use your local dealer for advice on gear.
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#1210363 - 03/02/09 01:41 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: captain hook]
JimFromTN
8 Point


Registered: 07/14/08
Posts: 1388
Loc: Nashville, TN

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I'm no expert and to tell you the truth, you probably should not listen to an expert, especially one in a fly shop. Fly shops are good because they do often give casting lessons and they carry things that you can't get anywhere else like tippets, flies, and the goop you put on your dry flies to keep them afloat. I think that casting lessons would be a better investment than the $600 rod they are going to tell you that you absolutely need not to mention the $300 reel and the hundreds of dollars worth of fly line, tippets, and various other things. I have been fly fishing since I was about 9 yrs old and I am now in my early forties. I fished over 20 years with an 8 ft 5 wt fiberglas flyrod my father made me. I fished the Galitin river in Montana with it when I was 18. It worked just fine. You can go out and get a nice graphite flyrod in the $60 to $100 range that will work just fine for a beginner. You will end up spending almost as much for the reel if not more. Yes, you will eventually want to buy another rod. Thats part of getting into fishing regardless of the method you use. There is no fly rod that is great for everything just like there is no spinning rod that will suit all your needs.

For a starter rod, I would get an 8' rod in the 5 to 6 wt range. You could go shorter and lighter if you want. Get a reel with 2 spools. One for floating line and one for sinking line. Get a good variety of tippets.

If you have access to a boat, one of the best ways to learn to cast a fly is to go out to an open lake when the may flys are hatching and throw some poppers for blue gill.

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#1210399 - 03/02/09 01:55 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: JimFromTN]
Fordman
12 Point


Registered: 08/06/00
Posts: 5864
Loc: Rockvale,tn

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 Originally Posted By: JimFromTN
I'm no expert and to tell you the truth, you probably should not listen to an expert, especially one in a fly shop. Fly shops are good because they do often give casting lessons and they carry things that you can't get anywhere else like tippets, flies, and the goop you put on your dry flies to keep them afloat. I think that casting lessons would be a better investment than the $600 rod they are going to tell you that you absolutely need not to mention the $300 reel and the hundreds of dollars worth of fly line, tippets, and various other things. I have been fly fishing since I was about 9 yrs old and I am now in my early forties. I fished over 20 years with an 8 ft 5 wt fiberglas flyrod my father made me. I fished the Galitin river in Montana with it when I was 18. It worked just fine. You can go out and get a nice graphite flyrod in the $60 to $100 range that will work just fine for a beginner. You will end up spending almost as much for the reel if not more. Yes, you will eventually want to buy another rod. Thats part of getting into fishing regardless of the method you use. There is no fly rod that is great for everything just like there is no spinning rod that will suit all your needs.

For a starter rod, I would get an 8' rod in the 5 to 6 wt range. You could go shorter and lighter if you want. Get a reel with 2 spools. One for floating line and one for sinking line. Get a good variety of tippets.

If you have access to a boat, one of the best ways to learn to cast a fly is to go out to an open lake when the may flys are hatching and throw some poppers for blue gill.






Dont know which nashville shop you have seen try to put a novice into a 600.00 rod but the shop I use would never do that. THere are starter kids from 50.00 to infinity availible. He can go to a fly shop and actually cast the set up and see what he thinks. Right now you can get the redington to sage kits between 199 and 399. Thats rod,line, and reel.
A Fly Shop is like a archery pro shop. You run out tonight and test cast a BPS or cabelas rod and get back to us on the service you got....
And an 5/6 would be great for trout/panfish/ creek and stream angling but a 7 or an 8 would be more univeral for all the opportunities we have here in Tennessee. Since the origional poster is from East tn I would highly recommend he visit Little River outfitters and cast as many rods in his price range as he can.
A fly shop will be able to get you the right size tippets to ccomodate the type fishing you will be doing. Trying to learn to fly fish without a mentor or a good local flyshop is very hard to do. Since the guy is in East Tennessee I would say he could PM 7mm-08 and maybe get some very useful localized information.

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#1210433 - 03/02/09 02:17 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Fordman]
Radar
Non-Typical


Registered: 08/19/01
Posts: 31145
Loc: Kansas City, Mo.

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I have bought several bass fishing rods from both BPS and Cabelas and never had a problem with the rods or the service .
I don't think fly rods are any different to me . It's just another way to present a lure. I think the original poster was just looking for a simple setup to get started with without breaking the bank.
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#1210444 - 03/02/09 02:23 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Radar]
Fordman
12 Point


Registered: 08/06/00
Posts: 5864
Loc: Rockvale,tn

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 Originally Posted By: Scott61
I have bought several bass fishing rods from both BPS and Cabelas and never had a problem with the rods or the service .
I don't think fly rods are any different to me . It's just another way to present a lure. I think the original poster was just looking for a simple setup to get started with without breaking the bank.

Scott I sgree my point was to SHOP LOCALLY if at all possible.

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#1210456 - 03/02/09 02:39 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Nhill]
B.D.
8 Point


Registered: 03/24/08
Posts: 1484
Loc: Hendersonville TN

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Gil's advice is good.

For trout and river smallies, you probably want to go with a 9 foot 5wt or 6wt rod. The choice on weight depends on which fish you'll go after most. If you think you'll go trout fishing more, go with the 5 wt. If you think you'll be after smallies more, go with the 6 wt. A 5wt rod will land any smallie in the world. However, if you smallmouth fish a lot you will be throwing some bigger poppers and streamers, and the big flies will be easier to cast with a bit heavier rod.

As far as rod length, I would go with a 9 foot. You just really don't gain much "accessibility" from a short rod on small rivers. Even a short flyrod is 7 ft, and two feet of length doesn't really make that much difference when you've got 30 feet of line out behind you on a backcast. In fact, the long rod can actually be an advantage in tight quarters sometimes, because it's easier to roll cast once you get the hang of it.

I do not like Bass Pro rods because the warranty sucks. Fly rods tend to be very long with very fine tips, which increases the likelihood of breaking a tip off a rod. It's worth the money to go with a manufacturer that offers a "no questions asked" warranty where you can send the rod back and get it replaced for a nominal charge if you break it. The Sage Launch is a nice rod for a couple hundred bucks. Temple Fork and Redington both have some nice rods between $100 and $200. Buyer beware on fly rods under $100 - especially the Bass Pro ones. Like you said, you'll regret buying a "cheap" one (fly rods tend to be more expensive than conventional gear).

Whatever you get, get it from a local shop instead of online or at a big box. The advice and guidance you get will be worth the effort, and the prices really aren't that much different.

Finally, to Captain Hook - sinking lines aren't for beginners, but if you don't use one regularly, you're missing out. Streamers for big trout and stripers - 'nuff said.

bd


Edited by Brian Dunigan (03/02/09 02:45 PM)

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#1210467 - 03/02/09 02:46 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: B.D.]
Radar
Non-Typical


Registered: 08/19/01
Posts: 31145
Loc: Kansas City, Mo.

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http://www.best-fly-fishing-gear.com/fly-rods-llbean.html
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#1210513 - 03/02/09 03:09 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: B.D.]
stillinscrubs
4 Point


Registered: 08/16/07
Posts: 350
Loc: nashville, tn

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I agree with BD on this. Longer rod good, bass pro warranty bad, 6wt if more small mouth fishing, 5wt if more trout.

I like temple fork and redington rods also and I have been at it for 28 years. I think the TFO singature is better in the 5wt than the 6wt, I have both, the 5wt is less stiff, but both will work. Click on the links to see the rods and WARRANTIES. I have a redington RS3 4wt that is all I fish with for trout, stick with a 5 or 6wt for your first rod.

http://www.templeforkflyrods.com/rods/signature.html#T

http://www.redington.com/cat.php?k=50169

Look for rod, reel, line packages and save a few bucks.

Line:
To start get a floating line in the style DT (double taper) or WF (weight forward) I lean towards the WF, you can load the rod better (cast a little more easily.) Buy a line rated for your rods weight, 5 wt rod, get 5 wt line. You do not need to worry about sinking lines, tips or any of that "stuff" right now. Probably better to spend more money here if you can afford it. The lines will last longer and float better longer, but no need to spend more than $80.

Reel:
Get the cheapest reel that will hold the line you buy and 50-100 yards of backing. 20 or 30# dacron. All flylines are rated for 30lb breaking strength so don't get heavier than 30lb backing. You do not need a reel with a adjustable drag, a clicker reel will work just fine. The reel is the least important piece of equipment in fly fishing. Pick one up at a garage sale, that's shopping locally I think.

Buying more expensive gear is like buying more expensive cars...you may get something more, but a lot of the markup is for the name, when all you need to do is get from point a to point b. IMO.

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#1210558 - 03/02/09 03:22 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Radar]
B.D.
8 Point


Registered: 03/24/08
Posts: 1484
Loc: Hendersonville TN

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 Originally Posted By: Scott61
http://www.best-fly-fishing-gear.com/fly-rods-llbean.html


We get your point, Scott - you really like Cabela's and don't see the sense in going to a local shop. \:\)

Here's the thing: For what Nhill is trying to do, the ideal rod models from Cabela's would be the LST or the PT+. A 9' 5wt LST will set him back $175, and a PT+ will cost $195. Now, Cabela's has cheaper rods available, but they are garbage. If you buy a $50 fly rod from Cabelas or anywhere else, it's going to be noodly, not cast well, and it will start falling apart if you use it like a serious fisherman (line guide wraps coming unglued and stuff like that). Trust me, been there, done that.

You were implying that buying online/big box would be a lot cheaper than shopping locally, but it isn't so. Their quality gear costs about the same, and you don't get the added benefit of being able to cast the rod before you buy it to make sure it fits you, you don't get help matching the rod to a good reel within your budget, etc.

I will tell you this, too: If I'm going to spend $175 or less on a flyrod, I would buy a Temple Fork or Redington any day before I would buy a Cabela's rod. Better quality for the price.

bd

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#1210685 - 03/02/09 03:34 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: B.D.]
Radar
Non-Typical


Registered: 08/19/01
Posts: 31145
Loc: Kansas City, Mo.

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 Originally Posted By: Brian Dunigan
 Originally Posted By: Scott61
http://www.best-fly-fishing-gear.com/fly-rods-llbean.html


We get your point, Scott - you really like Cabela's and don't see the sense in going to a local shop. \:\)

Here's the thing: For what Nhill is trying to do, the ideal rod models from Cabela's would be the LST or the PT+. A 9' 5wt LST will set him back $175, and a PT+ will cost $195. Now, Cabela's has cheaper rods available, but they are garbage. If you buy a $50 fly rod from Cabelas or anywhere else, it's going to be noodly, not cast well, and it will start falling apart if you use it like a serious fisherman (line guide wraps coming unglued and stuff like that). Trust me, been there, done that.

You were implying that buying online/big box would be a lot cheaper than shopping locally, but it isn't so. Their quality gear costs about the same, and you don't get the added benefit of being able to cast the rod before you buy it to make sure it fits you, you don't get help matching the rod to a good reel within your budget, etc.

I will tell you this, too: If I'm going to spend $175 or less on a flyrod, I would buy a Temple Fork or Redington any day before I would buy a Cabela's rod. Better quality for the price.

bd


I would buy at a local flyshop , but have no local flyshops in my area ,and I'm not driving an hour to Nashville . Sorry to offend the fly fishing purists with my purchase from Cabelas ,but I'm temporarily laid off and on a tight budget.
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