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#1209833 - 03/02/09 08:55 AM Intro to fly fishing
Nhill
8 Point


Registered: 09/30/01
Posts: 1629
Loc: Maryville, TN

Offline
I have wanted to get into fly fishing for a couple of years now, and I think I am ready to dive in. Basically I want to be able to fly fish for trout, river smallies, and such. I really don't know what to look for in a fly rod. I want to get the cheapest one that I can, but I don't want to have to buy another one in a month or two because I regretted getting the cheap one. Like I said, I don't know what to look for, but I don't think that I would want a real long rod for accessibility reasons in small rivers.

Does anyone have any recommendations?
Thanks

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#1209841 - 03/02/09 09:02 AM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Nhill]
Fordman
12 Point


Registered: 08/06/00
Posts: 5864
Loc: Rockvale,tn

Offline
 Originally Posted By: Nhill
I have wanted to get into fly fishing for a couple of years now, and I think I am ready to dive in. Basically I want to be able to fly fish for trout, river smallies, and such. I really don't know what to look for in a fly rod. I want to get the cheapest one that I can, but I don't want to have to buy another one in a month or two because I regretted getting the cheap one. Like I said, I don't know what to look for, but I don't think that I would want a real long rod for accessibility reasons in small rivers.

Does anyone have any recommendations?
Thanks



A good rod does not have to cost an arm and a leg.... just a leg..lol Look at Echo rods they retail for about 279 and carry a lifetime warrenty, have two tips a fast and a slow. If your looking to save dollars you can cut costs on a reel. Dont pinch pennies on the rod or the line. Look at the Rio series of lines. I like them because I get several seasons out of them. If your actually new and have not done it before I would strongly suggest two things. First take a casting lesson at your local fly shop. Its easier to learn right from the get go then to go back and try to forget bad habits you developed. Second book a day with a guide. You can learn volumes ffrom a good guide in a single day.

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#1209871 - 03/02/09 09:20 AM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Fordman]
Radar
Non-Typical


Registered: 08/19/01
Posts: 31209
Loc: Kansas City, Mo.

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I ordered a nice outfit from Cabela's yesterday . Check out the Wind River series .BPS also has the White River series that is a good outfit for beginners and novice fly fishermen .
_________________________

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#1209883 - 03/02/09 09:26 AM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Radar]
Fordman
12 Point


Registered: 08/06/00
Posts: 5864
Loc: Rockvale,tn

Offline
 Originally Posted By: Scott61
I ordered a nice outfit from Cabela's yesterday . Check out the Wind River series .BPS also has the White River series that is a good outfit for beginners and novice fly fishermen .

If your only throwing a floating line they would be good. The thing most folks dont understand is that casting a 200+ grain sinking line and a weighted fly takes a rod with backbone. I am not saying those rods wont do it as I have never fishied them. I personally prefer a rod that can pick up a 250 or 300 grain sinking head and then I know for a fact it will throw a floating lilne a country mile.

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#1209887 - 03/02/09 09:26 AM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Fordman]
Fordman
12 Point


Registered: 08/06/00
Posts: 5864
Loc: Rockvale,tn

Offline
Additionally.... flyfishing is like archery..... support your local fly (pro) shops every chance you get!
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#1209902 - 03/02/09 09:33 AM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Fordman]
Radar
Non-Typical


Registered: 08/19/01
Posts: 31209
Loc: Kansas City, Mo.

Offline
 Originally Posted By: Fordman
 Originally Posted By: Scott61
I ordered a nice outfit from Cabela's yesterday . Check out the Wind River series .BPS also has the White River series that is a good outfit for beginners and novice fly fishermen .

If your only throwing a floating line they would be good. The thing most folks dont understand is that casting a 200+ grain sinking line and a weighted fly takes a rod with backbone. I am not saying those rods wont do it as I have never fishied them. I personally prefer a rod that can pick up a 250 or 300 grain sinking head and then I know for a fact it will throw a floating lilne a country mile.


I understand . I just can't afford a high dollar setup right now . ;\) I'll be throwing a 9' 8 wt. rod for smallies and hybrid stripers .
_________________________

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#1210224 - 03/02/09 12:08 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: ]
Fordman
12 Point


Registered: 08/06/00
Posts: 5864
Loc: Rockvale,tn

Offline
 Originally Posted By: captain hook
I can think of no reason to throw a sinking line of any kind other then an intermediate in this area. Of course what do I know...

On the rods, go to Little River and cast some rods. The only way to find a rod which fits you and will be comfortable and be easy for you to learn on is to go try them out. Also you can pick up some free casting tips as well.

Mail ordering equipment is killing the small business's like LRO and others. Where you can go get hands on advice from locals any day of the week.

Don't randomly order rods, it is a recipe for failure. But what do I know...

Let me clarify for you... sink tips.... Guess I should have been real clear on this board with all the experts and all.

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#1210286 - 03/02/09 12:46 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Fordman]
gil1
12 Point


Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 6339
Loc: Nashville, TN

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Even though I use sink tips and intermediate sinking lines too, full sinking lines play a part in my arsenal. I don't really enjoy streamer fishing anyway (mostly because of a shoulder injury). But I use them often when I toss streamers.

I love them for stripers (in the winter only). I love them in deep holes for trout (like on the Cumberland River). I love them in deep, fast rivers for smallies when they won't hit in the top few feet of the water column. I love them for skipjacks at the steam plant (when the water is rolling, the intermediates won't get down far enough to get even a single bite).

On the other hand, I much prefer a floating line if I can get away with it.

On the rod thing, I like to tell them at the shop what I'm fishing for in what conditions and what I can spend. They pick rods for me to cast. I try out rods without looking at the price or the manufacturer.

Often, I'll pick a rod that is medium to low cost. I assume it's because my stroke is not sophisticated enough to recognize the innovative technologies of the more expensive rods.

For some reason, I have a $100 Cabelas travel rod that I can cast much better than a $500 Sage in the same weight. That certainly doesn't mean that Cabelas is better than Sage. It just means my casting style fits one and not the other. I have other Sages that cast great.

I usually buy rods with full warranties because I have broken almost every rod I own (never once on a fish). I always buy from the shops, not over the net for the reasons others stated.


Edited by gil1 (03/02/09 03:53 PM)
Edit Reason: screwup
_________________________
It is not the killing ...; it is the contest of skill and cunning. The true hunter counts his achievement in proportion to the effort involved and the fairness of the sport.

Dr. Saxton Pope

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#1210363 - 03/02/09 01:41 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: ]
JimFromTN
8 Point


Registered: 07/14/08
Posts: 1419
Loc: Nashville, TN

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I'm no expert and to tell you the truth, you probably should not listen to an expert, especially one in a fly shop. Fly shops are good because they do often give casting lessons and they carry things that you can't get anywhere else like tippets, flies, and the goop you put on your dry flies to keep them afloat. I think that casting lessons would be a better investment than the $600 rod they are going to tell you that you absolutely need not to mention the $300 reel and the hundreds of dollars worth of fly line, tippets, and various other things. I have been fly fishing since I was about 9 yrs old and I am now in my early forties. I fished over 20 years with an 8 ft 5 wt fiberglas flyrod my father made me. I fished the Galitin river in Montana with it when I was 18. It worked just fine. You can go out and get a nice graphite flyrod in the $60 to $100 range that will work just fine for a beginner. You will end up spending almost as much for the reel if not more. Yes, you will eventually want to buy another rod. Thats part of getting into fishing regardless of the method you use. There is no fly rod that is great for everything just like there is no spinning rod that will suit all your needs.

For a starter rod, I would get an 8' rod in the 5 to 6 wt range. You could go shorter and lighter if you want. Get a reel with 2 spools. One for floating line and one for sinking line. Get a good variety of tippets.

If you have access to a boat, one of the best ways to learn to cast a fly is to go out to an open lake when the may flys are hatching and throw some poppers for blue gill.

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#1210399 - 03/02/09 01:55 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: JimFromTN]
Fordman
12 Point


Registered: 08/06/00
Posts: 5864
Loc: Rockvale,tn

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 Originally Posted By: JimFromTN
I'm no expert and to tell you the truth, you probably should not listen to an expert, especially one in a fly shop. Fly shops are good because they do often give casting lessons and they carry things that you can't get anywhere else like tippets, flies, and the goop you put on your dry flies to keep them afloat. I think that casting lessons would be a better investment than the $600 rod they are going to tell you that you absolutely need not to mention the $300 reel and the hundreds of dollars worth of fly line, tippets, and various other things. I have been fly fishing since I was about 9 yrs old and I am now in my early forties. I fished over 20 years with an 8 ft 5 wt fiberglas flyrod my father made me. I fished the Galitin river in Montana with it when I was 18. It worked just fine. You can go out and get a nice graphite flyrod in the $60 to $100 range that will work just fine for a beginner. You will end up spending almost as much for the reel if not more. Yes, you will eventually want to buy another rod. Thats part of getting into fishing regardless of the method you use. There is no fly rod that is great for everything just like there is no spinning rod that will suit all your needs.

For a starter rod, I would get an 8' rod in the 5 to 6 wt range. You could go shorter and lighter if you want. Get a reel with 2 spools. One for floating line and one for sinking line. Get a good variety of tippets.

If you have access to a boat, one of the best ways to learn to cast a fly is to go out to an open lake when the may flys are hatching and throw some poppers for blue gill.






Dont know which nashville shop you have seen try to put a novice into a 600.00 rod but the shop I use would never do that. THere are starter kids from 50.00 to infinity availible. He can go to a fly shop and actually cast the set up and see what he thinks. Right now you can get the redington to sage kits between 199 and 399. Thats rod,line, and reel.
A Fly Shop is like a archery pro shop. You run out tonight and test cast a BPS or cabelas rod and get back to us on the service you got....
And an 5/6 would be great for trout/panfish/ creek and stream angling but a 7 or an 8 would be more univeral for all the opportunities we have here in Tennessee. Since the origional poster is from East tn I would highly recommend he visit Little River outfitters and cast as many rods in his price range as he can.
A fly shop will be able to get you the right size tippets to ccomodate the type fishing you will be doing. Trying to learn to fly fish without a mentor or a good local flyshop is very hard to do. Since the guy is in East Tennessee I would say he could PM 7mm-08 and maybe get some very useful localized information.

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#1210433 - 03/02/09 02:17 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Fordman]
Radar
Non-Typical


Registered: 08/19/01
Posts: 31209
Loc: Kansas City, Mo.

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I have bought several bass fishing rods from both BPS and Cabelas and never had a problem with the rods or the service .
I don't think fly rods are any different to me . It's just another way to present a lure. I think the original poster was just looking for a simple setup to get started with without breaking the bank.
_________________________

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#1210444 - 03/02/09 02:23 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Radar]
Fordman
12 Point


Registered: 08/06/00
Posts: 5864
Loc: Rockvale,tn

Offline
 Originally Posted By: Scott61
I have bought several bass fishing rods from both BPS and Cabelas and never had a problem with the rods or the service .
I don't think fly rods are any different to me . It's just another way to present a lure. I think the original poster was just looking for a simple setup to get started with without breaking the bank.

Scott I sgree my point was to SHOP LOCALLY if at all possible.

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#1210456 - 03/02/09 02:39 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Nhill]
B.D.
8 Point


Registered: 03/24/08
Posts: 1484
Loc: Hendersonville TN

Offline
Gil's advice is good.

For trout and river smallies, you probably want to go with a 9 foot 5wt or 6wt rod. The choice on weight depends on which fish you'll go after most. If you think you'll go trout fishing more, go with the 5 wt. If you think you'll be after smallies more, go with the 6 wt. A 5wt rod will land any smallie in the world. However, if you smallmouth fish a lot you will be throwing some bigger poppers and streamers, and the big flies will be easier to cast with a bit heavier rod.

As far as rod length, I would go with a 9 foot. You just really don't gain much "accessibility" from a short rod on small rivers. Even a short flyrod is 7 ft, and two feet of length doesn't really make that much difference when you've got 30 feet of line out behind you on a backcast. In fact, the long rod can actually be an advantage in tight quarters sometimes, because it's easier to roll cast once you get the hang of it.

I do not like Bass Pro rods because the warranty sucks. Fly rods tend to be very long with very fine tips, which increases the likelihood of breaking a tip off a rod. It's worth the money to go with a manufacturer that offers a "no questions asked" warranty where you can send the rod back and get it replaced for a nominal charge if you break it. The Sage Launch is a nice rod for a couple hundred bucks. Temple Fork and Redington both have some nice rods between $100 and $200. Buyer beware on fly rods under $100 - especially the Bass Pro ones. Like you said, you'll regret buying a "cheap" one (fly rods tend to be more expensive than conventional gear).

Whatever you get, get it from a local shop instead of online or at a big box. The advice and guidance you get will be worth the effort, and the prices really aren't that much different.

Finally, to Captain Hook - sinking lines aren't for beginners, but if you don't use one regularly, you're missing out. Streamers for big trout and stripers - 'nuff said.

bd


Edited by Brian Dunigan (03/02/09 02:45 PM)

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#1210467 - 03/02/09 02:46 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: B.D.]
Radar
Non-Typical


Registered: 08/19/01
Posts: 31209
Loc: Kansas City, Mo.

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http://www.best-fly-fishing-gear.com/fly-rods-llbean.html
_________________________

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#1210513 - 03/02/09 03:09 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: B.D.]
stillinscrubs
4 Point


Registered: 08/16/07
Posts: 351
Loc: nashville, tn

Offline
I agree with BD on this. Longer rod good, bass pro warranty bad, 6wt if more small mouth fishing, 5wt if more trout.

I like temple fork and redington rods also and I have been at it for 28 years. I think the TFO singature is better in the 5wt than the 6wt, I have both, the 5wt is less stiff, but both will work. Click on the links to see the rods and WARRANTIES. I have a redington RS3 4wt that is all I fish with for trout, stick with a 5 or 6wt for your first rod.

http://www.templeforkflyrods.com/rods/signature.html#T

http://www.redington.com/cat.php?k=50169

Look for rod, reel, line packages and save a few bucks.

Line:
To start get a floating line in the style DT (double taper) or WF (weight forward) I lean towards the WF, you can load the rod better (cast a little more easily.) Buy a line rated for your rods weight, 5 wt rod, get 5 wt line. You do not need to worry about sinking lines, tips or any of that "stuff" right now. Probably better to spend more money here if you can afford it. The lines will last longer and float better longer, but no need to spend more than $80.

Reel:
Get the cheapest reel that will hold the line you buy and 50-100 yards of backing. 20 or 30# dacron. All flylines are rated for 30lb breaking strength so don't get heavier than 30lb backing. You do not need a reel with a adjustable drag, a clicker reel will work just fine. The reel is the least important piece of equipment in fly fishing. Pick one up at a garage sale, that's shopping locally I think.

Buying more expensive gear is like buying more expensive cars...you may get something more, but a lot of the markup is for the name, when all you need to do is get from point a to point b. IMO.

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#1210558 - 03/02/09 03:22 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Radar]
B.D.
8 Point


Registered: 03/24/08
Posts: 1484
Loc: Hendersonville TN

Offline
 Originally Posted By: Scott61
http://www.best-fly-fishing-gear.com/fly-rods-llbean.html


We get your point, Scott - you really like Cabela's and don't see the sense in going to a local shop. \:\)

Here's the thing: For what Nhill is trying to do, the ideal rod models from Cabela's would be the LST or the PT+. A 9' 5wt LST will set him back $175, and a PT+ will cost $195. Now, Cabela's has cheaper rods available, but they are garbage. If you buy a $50 fly rod from Cabelas or anywhere else, it's going to be noodly, not cast well, and it will start falling apart if you use it like a serious fisherman (line guide wraps coming unglued and stuff like that). Trust me, been there, done that.

You were implying that buying online/big box would be a lot cheaper than shopping locally, but it isn't so. Their quality gear costs about the same, and you don't get the added benefit of being able to cast the rod before you buy it to make sure it fits you, you don't get help matching the rod to a good reel within your budget, etc.

I will tell you this, too: If I'm going to spend $175 or less on a flyrod, I would buy a Temple Fork or Redington any day before I would buy a Cabela's rod. Better quality for the price.

bd

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#1210685 - 03/02/09 03:34 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: B.D.]
Radar
Non-Typical


Registered: 08/19/01
Posts: 31209
Loc: Kansas City, Mo.

Offline
 Originally Posted By: Brian Dunigan
 Originally Posted By: Scott61
http://www.best-fly-fishing-gear.com/fly-rods-llbean.html


We get your point, Scott - you really like Cabela's and don't see the sense in going to a local shop. \:\)

Here's the thing: For what Nhill is trying to do, the ideal rod models from Cabela's would be the LST or the PT+. A 9' 5wt LST will set him back $175, and a PT+ will cost $195. Now, Cabela's has cheaper rods available, but they are garbage. If you buy a $50 fly rod from Cabelas or anywhere else, it's going to be noodly, not cast well, and it will start falling apart if you use it like a serious fisherman (line guide wraps coming unglued and stuff like that). Trust me, been there, done that.

You were implying that buying online/big box would be a lot cheaper than shopping locally, but it isn't so. Their quality gear costs about the same, and you don't get the added benefit of being able to cast the rod before you buy it to make sure it fits you, you don't get help matching the rod to a good reel within your budget, etc.

I will tell you this, too: If I'm going to spend $175 or less on a flyrod, I would buy a Temple Fork or Redington any day before I would buy a Cabela's rod. Better quality for the price.

bd


I would buy at a local flyshop , but have no local flyshops in my area ,and I'm not driving an hour to Nashville . Sorry to offend the fly fishing purists with my purchase from Cabelas ,but I'm temporarily laid off and on a tight budget.
_________________________

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#1210712 - 03/02/09 03:46 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: gil1]
Radar
Non-Typical


Registered: 08/19/01
Posts: 31209
Loc: Kansas City, Mo.

Offline
 Originally Posted By: gil1
Even though I use sink tips and intermediate sinking lines too, full sinking lines play a part in my arsenal. I don't really enjoy streamer fishing anyway (mostly because of a shoulder injury). But I use them often when I toss streamers.

I love them for stripers (in the winter only). I love them in deep holes for trout (like on the Cumberland River). I love them in deep, fast rivers for smallies when they won't hit in the top few feet of the water column. I love them for skipjacks at the steam plant (when the water is rolling, the intermediates won't get down far enough to get even a single bite).

On the other hand, I much prefer a floating line if I can get away with it.

On the rod thing, I like to tell them at the shop what I'm fishing for in what conditions and what I can spend. They pick rods for me to cast. I try out rods without looking at the price or the manufacturer.

Often, I'll pick a rod that is medium to low cost. I assume it's because my stroke is not sophisticated enough to recognize the innovative technologies of the more expensive rods.

For some reason, I have a $100 Cabelas travel rod that I can cast much better than a $500 Sage in the same weight. That certainly doesn't mean that Sage is bettere than Cabelas. it just means my casting style fits one and not the other. I have other Sages that cast great.

I usually buy rods with full warranties because I have broken almost every rod I own (never once on a fish). I always buy from the shops, not over the net for the reasons others stated.


Very good advise Gil .
_________________________

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#1210739 - 03/02/09 04:07 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Radar]
B.D.
8 Point


Registered: 03/24/08
Posts: 1484
Loc: Hendersonville TN

Offline
Sorry - I really didn't mean to turn that into as big an argument as I made it.

bd

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#1210769 - 03/02/09 04:24 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: B.D.]
Nhill
8 Point


Registered: 09/30/01
Posts: 1629
Loc: Maryville, TN

Offline
Thanks for all the advice. I had no idea where to start, and I am all for buying local, so I think I will go to little river and try some out. I like to fish for trout, but I will probably do more small mouth fishing in the rivers than anything.

Brian, don't worry about turning it into an argument. That is when a lot of viewpoints and opinions come out.

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#1210776 - 03/02/09 04:27 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Nhill]
go_okfishin
6 Point


Registered: 12/14/03
Posts: 679
Loc: Bellevue

Offline
Nhill,
Is Wynn's sporting goods in Maryville still in business? I bought my first Fenwick fly rods from them back in 88.
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always lookin

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#1210779 - 03/02/09 04:28 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: go_okfishin]
Nhill
8 Point


Registered: 09/30/01
Posts: 1629
Loc: Maryville, TN

Offline
No, they went out of business maybe 3 or 4 years ago.
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#1210784 - 03/02/09 04:30 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Nhill]
go_okfishin
6 Point


Registered: 12/14/03
Posts: 679
Loc: Bellevue

Offline
That s***s. They were a great local sporting goods store.
_________________________
always lookin

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#1210786 - 03/02/09 04:32 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: gil1]
7mm08
10 Point


Registered: 09/12/07
Posts: 4919
Loc: In a river hopefully!

Offline
Next year will be 30 years of fly fishing only. I trout, bass, striper, redfish, seatrout mostly.

I am also the greatest abuser of flyfishing equipment. I have fallen on more rods and broken them than most guys will ever own.

Go buy a Temple Fork Outfitters...TFO 9ft 5wt rod. Light enough for trout, heavy enough(stiff), for smallies. 6wt is too stiff for lighter tippet. Cost about 200 buck.

Next, go to Bass Pro and buy a Hobbs Creek reel for a 5wt. Get them to load it up with backing and put the line on. That reel is about 40 bucks. I have landed stripers over 20# with the old one I have, and redfish greater than 10#. Cheap but they work. I no longer use them because i have gotten a little more cash now and spend a little more for equipment.

Good LUck
_________________________
I hunt and fish not for the thrill of the kill, but for the thrill of the grill!!

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#1210790 - 03/02/09 04:34 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: go_okfishin]
Nhill
8 Point


Registered: 09/30/01
Posts: 1629
Loc: Maryville, TN

Offline
We really haven't had a good all around sporting goods store in Maryville since. Well, Dicks just built a store a few months ago, but I hate Dicks, small selection and high prices. There are some gun shops and fishing shops, but nothing like Wynns was.
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#1210854 - 03/02/09 05:44 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: ]
go_okfishin
6 Point


Registered: 12/14/03
Posts: 679
Loc: Bellevue

Offline
Dang, Captain good thing your not a comedian cause you sure know how to silence a room. \:D \:D \:D
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always lookin

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#1210858 - 03/02/09 05:46 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: ]
Radar
Non-Typical


Registered: 08/19/01
Posts: 31209
Loc: Kansas City, Mo.

Offline
I'm fortunate to have learned to fly fish from my father . He was a great mentor and awesome fly fisherman. No , I'm no expert , but some of my fondest fishing memories where with my father, when we just had a flyrod fishing for gills on the beds .
Dad didn't talk about top dollar equipment , but re-enforced good technique through example. He has caught everything from bream ,bass, steelhead, and grayling , to Tarpon.
Many of you guys would probably laugh at the fiberglass flyrod and automatic reel he gave me more than 30 years ago , but it has a special meaning to me because of the memories it brings back.
Like hunting ,fly fishing doesn't have to become complicated . Just the simple enjoyment of being on the water , and sharing it with loved ones or good friends is what really matters.
_________________________

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#1210864 - 03/02/09 05:50 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: B.D.]
jakeway
TnDeer Old Timer
10 Point


Registered: 11/22/99
Posts: 3577
Loc: Hendersonville, TN, USA

Offline
 Originally Posted By: Brian Dunigan
...I do not like Bass Pro rods because the warranty sucks...

bd


I currently have 11 fly rods in the house, ranging from an old Eagle Claw fiberglass to Orvis Rocky Mountain, Browning, 4 different Bass Pro, a Courtland, and a TFO. Granted, none (except maybe the Orvis) retailed for over $200, but all have served me well.

I also recommend going the fly shop route for beginners (save them all the learning pains I went through over the last 45 years of fly fishing).

What I don't understand is the above comment about Bass Pro's warranty. I've only returned one Orvis reel and some Cortland line that I didn't like the feel of, and BPS took them back no questions asked. I have a good friend that broke the tip on his Bass Pro White River rod by carrying it strapped on the back of a motorcycle (without using a rod case) and they replaced it with a brand new rod, no questions, even though my buddy had no receipt for the rod.

How can you get better warranty service than that?

(Note I said Warranty Service. Many times I've gone in there and the salesman didn't know anything about the products I was inquiring about.)
_________________________
It's not rocket surgery, for crying outside!

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#1210919 - 03/02/09 06:13 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: jakeway]
Radar
Non-Typical


Registered: 08/19/01
Posts: 31209
Loc: Kansas City, Mo.

Offline
While I can't vouch for Bass pro fly rods , I have owned several of their baitcasting rods without a problem with any of them .
I will also mention that Bass Pro Shops are a sponsor and supporter of tndeer , and gave out many door prizes at the vous . I like to support local businesses if there are any in the area , but I will also support the sponsors of this website too . They help pay the bills to keep the website up and allow us to share information on these forums.
Note the BPS banner at the top of the page . ;\)
_________________________

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#1210949 - 03/02/09 06:17 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Radar]
madMax
4 Point


Registered: 04/09/08
Posts: 130
Loc: Middle TN

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 Originally Posted By: Scott61
I'm fortunate to have learned to fly fish from my father . He was a great mentor and awesome fly fisherman. No , I'm no expert , but some of my fondest fishing memories where with my father, when we just had a flyrod fishing for gills on the beds .
Dad didn't talk about top dollar equipment , but re-enforced good technique through example. He has caught everything from bream ,bass, steelhead, and grayling , to Tarpon.
Many of you guys would probably laugh at the fiberglass flyrod and automatic reel he gave me more than 30 years ago , but it has a special meaning to me because of the memories it brings back.
Like hunting ,fly fishing doesn't have to become complicated . Just the simple enjoyment of being on the water , and sharing it with loved ones or good friends is what really matters.


Dont worry Scott, Im with you on this one. Dad taught himself with a cheap fiberglass and taught me with one. I still use it, the cheap ole Pflueger has served me well 15 years..hows that for quality? Caught everything from 3 and 4 lb river smallies to trout to BIG ole carp on it. I spin fish way more than flyfish but when I use it, it always brings back memories. Dont let anyone on here tell you that you need $200+ to get started in flyfishing.


Edited by MaxD (03/02/09 07:41 PM)

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#1211007 - 03/02/09 06:59 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: madMax]
snaildarter
4 Point


Registered: 11/16/06
Posts: 147
Loc: Knoxville, TN

Offline
I'm a st. croix and g loomis fan myself. I've fished rivers from Utah, Colorado, Idaho, Arkasas to the headwater streams in the smokies with a 7'6" gl2 4 wt rod. In my eyes it is the perfect trout rod. I've got a 8'6" 5wt/6wt that I use on the lake fishing for bass that I picked up cheap from http://www.albrightflyfish.com/ , it is ok.

If anyone happens to pass thru Chattanooga they have a sweet deal on a 9' 7wt St. croix right now. I'm debating picking one up next week when I'm back down there.

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#1211060 - 03/02/09 07:35 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: madMax]
Fordman
12 Point


Registered: 08/06/00
Posts: 5864
Loc: Rockvale,tn

Offline
 Originally Posted By: MaxD
 Originally Posted By: Scott61
I'm fortunate to have learned to fly fish from my father . He was a great mentor and awesome fly fisherman. No , I'm no expert , but some of my fondest fishing memories where with my father, when we just had a flyrod fishing for gills on the beds .
Dad didn't talk about top dollar equipment , but re-enforced good technique through example. He has caught everything from bream ,bass, steelhead, and grayling , to Tarpon.
Many of you guys would probably laugh at the fiberglass flyrod and automatic reel he gave me more than 30 years ago , but it has a special meaning to me because of the memories it brings back.
Like hunting ,fly fishing doesn't have to become complicated . Just the simple enjoyment of being on the water , and sharing it with loved ones or good friends is what really matters.


Dont worry Scott, Im with you on this one. Dad taught himself with a cheap fiberglass and taught me with one. I still use it, the cheap ole Pflueger has served me well 15 years..hows that for quality? Caught everything from 3 and 4 lb river smallies to trout to BIG ole carp on it. I spin fish way more than flyfish but when I use it, it always brings back memories. Dont let anyone on here tell you that you need $200+ to get started in flyfishing. Alot of these guys are just Orvis fly only fanboys no matter how much they try to hide it...dang Im sounding too much like Tubby Tubs I gotta stop posting for awhile.

I am not trying to pick a fight here but why is it a fisherman can own the best casting rods, high dollar reels, a 40K plus boat and literally thousands in terminal tackle and thats just fishing. Yet let a flyfisherman post and I have to hear the bullshite about orvis boys? SO freaking what that I like to use the best equipment I can afford. How is my 600 dollar sage z axis any different that a 600 dollar bow or a 600 dollar rifle? Someone please tell me why a person who is serious about fly fishing has be be poked in the eye by some of you.
I have a thompson A vice my father used to tie flies on when I was a kid. Do I use it? About once a year when I take a trip down memory lane. I choose to tie on a "high dollar" vice for two reasons. First its a better vice and second because I freaking want to.
As far as rods go... I fish at the minimum a 100 days a year on my own plus another 50 as a guide. That fact alone negates the issue of price on a rod, all I want it Quality. Sometimes quality costs more and I am fine with that. What I am getting sick of is that fact that everytime there is a decent thread about flyfishing on this site some jackleg has to pop in about how ineffective fly fishing is or how its a rich mans sport. Well those same people are the ones with 600 dollar bows, 40K boats, and 1k rifles. Its all about what you love so why do some of you look hard in the mirror before you knock a fly angler because he uses good equipment.

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#1211079 - 03/02/09 07:48 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Fordman]
madMax
4 Point


Registered: 04/09/08
Posts: 130
Loc: Middle TN

Offline
I didnt mean to piss you off either - guess Ive just had too many run-ins with high dollar fly guys I hold a grudge now. Kinda like all the tournament threads that pop up every year and ppl who hold a grudge against them. I apologize. I was just letting him know you dont have to drop a few hundred dollars to catch fish or learn to fish with a flyrod thats all. Remark removed again I apologize.
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#1211091 - 03/02/09 07:52 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Fordman]
7mm08
10 Point


Registered: 09/12/07
Posts: 4919
Loc: In a river hopefully!

Offline
Capt. Hook,
Sage..... Come on now. You know they are overrated. Better than Horvis, but IMO overrated for my dollar. They also only replace the section of the rod broken, unlike my favorite rods...Loomis who replace the entire rod without questions asked.

I own three Loomis rods. I loan out my Sage to beginners to striper fish with, I don't loan out my Loomis rods. If Scott had not been so stuck on Sage he might have still been in business. TFO are great for beginnners. They have no idea for how to load a rod, or let alone cast, so why spend tons of money on one?

The last TFO I bought for my son was $130 and I bought that Hobbs creek reel that I mentioned. That kid can outcast just about anyone on the Clinch, and I will put money on that statement.

NHill. If you want to go this spring let me know. I will meet you, take you to the Clinch and let you try the rod I am talking about. Just PM me and see if you can get TVA to cut the water so we can fish. OK?



Edited by 7mm08 (03/02/09 07:56 PM)
_________________________
I hunt and fish not for the thrill of the kill, but for the thrill of the grill!!

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#1211107 - 03/02/09 07:57 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: madMax]
Fordman
12 Point


Registered: 08/06/00
Posts: 5864
Loc: Rockvale,tn

Offline
 Originally Posted By: MaxD
I didnt mean to piss you off either - guess Ive just had too many run-ins with high dollar fly guys I hold a grudge now. Kinda like all the tournament threads that pop up every year and ppl who hold a grudge against them. I apologize. I was just letting him know you dont have to drop a few hundred dollars to catch fish or learn to fish with a flyrod thats all. Remark removed again I apologize.

Max you dont need too apologize at all. Your EXACTLY right you dont NEED anything but a safety pin and a stick to catch any fish in the state. You dont NEED anything but a Homemade bow, some straight stick and some stone broadheads to kill a deer during archery and you DONT need anything but a .30 caliber flintlock to kill a deer during firearms season either. I dont care what anyone uses to kill deer or turkey. I could care less that Dr Dickle fishes tournaments with that gay guy Tennessee Todd... Just get tired of getting knocked for my choice of equipment.

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#1211113 - 03/02/09 08:00 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: 7mm08]
Fordman
12 Point


Registered: 08/06/00
Posts: 5864
Loc: Rockvale,tn

Offline
 Originally Posted By: 7mm08
Capt. Hook,
Sage..... Come on now. You know they are overrated. Better than Horvis, but IMO overrated for my dollar. They also only replace the section of the rod broken, unlike my favorite rods...Loomis who replace the entire rod without questions asked.

I own three Loomis rods. I loan out my Sage to beginners to striper fish with, I don't loan out my Loomis rods. If Scott had not been so stuck on Sage he might have still been in business. TFO are great for beginnners. They have no idea for how to load a rod, or let alone cast, so why spend tons of money on one?

The last TFO I bought for my son was $130 and I bought that Hobbs creek reel that I mentioned. That kid can outcast just about anyone on the Clinch, and I will put money on that statement.

NHill. If you want to go this spring let me know. I will meet you, take you to the Clinch and let you try the rod I am talking about. Just PM me and see if you can get TVA to cut the water so we can fish. OK?


Nhill I hear ole 7mm is a pretty good fly angler and he has taken the time to help me on some choices for striper lines... better jump at his offer.


Edited by Fordman (03/02/09 08:14 PM)

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#1211134 - 03/02/09 08:13 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: 7mm08]
Fordman
12 Point


Registered: 08/06/00
Posts: 5864
Loc: Rockvale,tn

Offline
 Originally Posted By: 7mm08
Capt. Hook,
Sage..... Come on now. You know they are overrated. Better than Horvis, but IMO overrated for my dollar. They also only replace the section of the rod broken, unlike my favorite rods...Loomis who replace the entire rod without questions asked.

I own three Loomis rods. I loan out my Sage to beginners to striper fish with, I don't loan out my Loomis rods. If Scott had not been so stuck on Sage he might have still been in business. TFO are great for beginnners. They have no idea for how to load a rod, or let alone cast, so why spend tons of money on one?

The last TFO I bought for my son was $130 and I bought that Hobbs creek reel that I mentioned. That kid can outcast just about anyone on the Clinch, and I will put money on that statement.

NHill. If you want to go this spring let me know. I will meet you, take you to the Clinch and let you try the rod I am talking about. Just PM me and see if you can get TVA to cut the water so we can fish. OK?



Sorry but I gotta agree with knothead (captain hook) on the sage choice.... The good news is I just figured out why Cpt hooks head is not in those pictures.... apparently arrogance makes his head swell and it just wont fit.....

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#1211259 - 03/02/09 09:24 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Fordman]
birddoginQ
4 Point


Registered: 11/11/07
Posts: 170
Loc: Knox, TN

Offline
The TFO recommendation is definitely the ticket. I fish both TFO and st. croix and love both of them. Both have high end rods but the meat of their selections are drastically lower than other aforementioned brands. And I (like others who have commented on their experience) fish alot, or help others fish alot, and only guide with high end rods. No matter where you buy the rod or what you get stay with it. It can be frustrating (especially if you forgo the guide and casting lesson) but you will get it. Alot of casting a fly rod is counterintuitive. For instance, the harder I cast....the farther it will go...not so. And along with that each rod is different. Pay attention to small things not only when you are learning but throughout your time with a fly rod. You will learn (maybe) we flyfish not for the rod, or the reel, or the size of the fish we catch, or the systems we use, or......... We flyfish for the experience. A fisherman progresses in his/her carrier. Learning, catching, catching the most, catching the biggest, catching the hard to catch, and so on. But if you truly want to enjoy what ever equipment you buy, learn to enjoy using it. PM me if you want to get together. I would be more than happy to help
_________________________
Outside is the only place where I feel like ME

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#1211572 - 03/03/09 05:12 AM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Fordman]
Radar
Non-Typical


Registered: 08/19/01
Posts: 31209
Loc: Kansas City, Mo.

Offline
 Originally Posted By: Fordman
 Originally Posted By: MaxD
 Originally Posted By: Scott61
I'm fortunate to have learned to fly fish from my father . He was a great mentor and awesome fly fisherman. No , I'm no expert , but some of my fondest fishing memories where with my father, when we just had a flyrod fishing for gills on the beds .
Dad didn't talk about top dollar equipment , but re-enforced good technique through example. He has caught everything from bream ,bass, steelhead, and grayling , to Tarpon.
Many of you guys would probably laugh at the fiberglass flyrod and automatic reel he gave me more than 30 years ago , but it has a special meaning to me because of the memories it brings back.
Like hunting ,fly fishing doesn't have to become complicated . Just the simple enjoyment of being on the water , and sharing it with loved ones or good friends is what really matters.


Dont worry Scott, Im with you on this one. Dad taught himself with a cheap fiberglass and taught me with one. I still use it, the cheap ole Pflueger has served me well 15 years..hows that for quality? Caught everything from 3 and 4 lb river smallies to trout to BIG ole carp on it. I spin fish way more than flyfish but when I use it, it always brings back memories. Dont let anyone on here tell you that you need $200+ to get started in flyfishing. Alot of these guys are just Orvis fly only fanboys no matter how much they try to hide it...dang Im sounding too much like Tubby Tubs I gotta stop posting for awhile.

I am not trying to pick a fight here but why is it a fisherman can own the best casting rods, high dollar reels, a 40K plus boat and literally thousands in terminal tackle and thats just fishing. Yet let a flyfisherman post and I have to hear the bullshite about orvis boys? SO freaking what that I like to use the best equipment I can afford. How is my 600 dollar sage z axis any different that a 600 dollar bow or a 600 dollar rifle? Someone please tell me why a person who is serious about fly fishing has be be poked in the eye by some of you.
I have a thompson A vice my father used to tie flies on when I was a kid. Do I use it? About once a year when I take a trip down memory lane. I choose to tie on a "high dollar" vice for two reasons. First its a better vice and second because I freaking want to.
As far as rods go... I fish at the minimum a 100 days a year on my own plus another 50 as a guide. That fact alone negates the issue of price on a rod, all I want it Quality. Sometimes quality costs more and I am fine with that. What I am getting sick of is that fact that everytime there is a decent thread about flyfishing on this site some jackleg has to pop in about how ineffective fly fishing is or how its a rich mans sport. Well those same people are the ones with 600 dollar bows, 40K boats, and 1k rifles. Its all about what you love so why do some of you look hard in the mirror before you knock a fly angler because he uses good equipment.


I don't own a $40,000 boat, nor the best of any other fishing equipment . I get by with allot of mid price tackle. My post was stated to emphasize the fact that everyone is different and should buy what suits their needs within their budget.
A beginning bowhunter doesn't need to go out and spend a fortune on a top end bow, but they do need to get one that fits them and their budget. I bought a bow off ebay last year for less than $300. I killed 5 deer with it.The archer makes the bow shoot, like the fisherman who makes the cast with the proper presentation.
Fly fishing is no different than any other aspect of fishing. I don't look down on the guy using the Zebco 202 while fishing with his son .I look up to him for sharing the experience with his son. My dad did the same with me. That was my whole point on the previous post.
I have said this about bowhunting , but I think it applies here as well . Promote the sport , not your choice of equipment. ;\) Be a mentor to others getting into the sport, especially the young fishermen.


_________________________

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#1211580 - 03/03/09 05:28 AM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Nhill]
ghosthunter
10 Point


Registered: 11/30/04
Posts: 3603
Loc: chattanooga

Offline
Hey Nhill. I've spent many days fishing up in your area, especially Little River all through the park. If you just wanna test the waters with fly fishing, just get a cheap combo kit. Something that you would get at Wal-Mart in a package for about $20. Belive me, that's all you need to fish those rivers and it will be a great thermometer for you to see if you like it or not. BTW those folks at LRO are great, but for now I would stik with dirt cheap then move up to something a little nicer with a lifetime warranty.
_________________________
it's a long way to the top if ya wanna rock 'n' roll

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#1211787 - 03/03/09 08:10 AM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: ]
B.D.
8 Point


Registered: 03/24/08
Posts: 1484
Loc: Hendersonville TN

Offline
 Originally Posted By: captain hook

This is going to come off as arrogant as anything I have ever written or said,


Hey, you're right!

Okay, so you caught a big striper on a floating line. So what? I've caught stripers on floating line too. Sometimes they feed on the surface.

You can put up all the pictures you want, and this statement is still wrong:

 Quote:
I can think of no reason to throw a sinking line of any kind other then an intermediate in this area.


Sorry, but it's just flat wrong.

Are sinking lines for beginners? No. But no reason to throw a sinking line in this area? Come on, give me a break.

Any day you want, I'll gladly invite you streamer fishing for stripers when they're suspended around 15 ft of water on Priest, or maybe chasing browns on the Caney when they're running one or two generators. I'll use a 350 grain sinking line and you use an intermediate, and we'll see whether you can think of a reason to "use a sinking line in this area" when you can't get your fly down to where the fish are. Maybe that will help you not have to worry about sounding "arrogant." \:\)

bd


Edited by Brian Dunigan (03/03/09 09:29 AM)

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#1211896 - 03/03/09 09:07 AM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: ]
JimFromTN
8 Point


Registered: 07/14/08
Posts: 1419
Loc: Nashville, TN

Offline
 Originally Posted By: captain hook
 Originally Posted By: JimFromTN
I'm no expert and to tell you the truth, you probably should not listen to an expert, especially one in a fly shop. Fly shops are good because they do often give casting lessons and they carry things that you can't get anywhere else like tippets, flies, and the goop you put on your dry flies to keep them afloat. I think that casting lessons would be a better investment than the $600 rod they are going to tell you that you absolutely need not to mention the $300 reel and the hundreds of dollars worth of fly line, tippets, and various other things. I have been fly fishing since I was about 9 yrs old and I am now in my early forties. I fished over 20 years with an 8 ft 5 wt fiberglas flyrod my father made me. I fished the Galitin river in Montana with it when I was 18. It worked just fine. You can go out and get a nice graphite flyrod in the $60 to $100 range that will work just fine for a beginner. You will end up spending almost as much for the reel if not more. Yes, you will eventually want to buy another rod. Thats part of getting into fishing regardless of the method you use. There is no fly rod that is great for everything just like there is no spinning rod that will suit all your needs.

For a starter rod, I would get an 8' rod in the 5 to 6 wt range. You could go shorter and lighter if you want. Get a reel with 2 spools. One for floating line and one for sinking line. Get a good variety of tippets.

If you have access to a boat, one of the best ways to learn to cast a fly is to go out to an open lake when the may flys are hatching and throw some poppers for blue gill.






Having been around those guys that work in Shops in Nashville as well as here in Knoxville I can say with 100% certainty there isn't a bigger load of BS in the world then what is above. Period.

You are making suggestions of rod lengths without considering a tenth of where he is wishing to fish, what he intends to use, or how he intends to use it.


I don't mean to bash all fly shops and I am sorry that I offended anyone. I was in Cumberland Transit last year and when the guy found out I wasn't some stick up the backside fly fishing elitist, he wanted nothing to do with me. I was actually looking around for a good may fly immitation to use on lakes. I wanted something a better than a traditional popper. My father used to make me some good ones but he pasted away a few years back so I needed to find a new source. The guy had no interest in helping me. Apparently, he was too stuck up to help someone who wanted to fish for panfish. I've fly fished for salmon in AK, trout in Montana, redfish in Florida (hopefully someday Tarpon), and yes bluegill on KY Lake. I walked around there and looked at the flyrods. Do they carry anything under $250 to $300? There is (or was. Its been a few years) a fly shop in Brentwood that did not carry anything less expensive but they were very nice people and very helpful so I would say the guy at Cumberland Transit was the exception and not the rule. My main point is that fly shops are usually more expensive and not what I would recomend for someone who is trying to break in to the world of fly fishing. Once that person has the experience and the technique down and wants to move up then by all means go and buy your equipment at a fly shop.

An 8 foot 5 wt rod is a good all around rod for TN and the guy is a beginner. 5 wt is light enough for panfish and trout and heavy enough for a descent size smallie. Some people are pushing for a 9 foot rod. Have you ever tried to fish some of the streams in the Smokies with a 9 ft rod? Your line will spend more time in the trees then in the water. An 8ft rod is good enough for long casts in open areas and maybe not the greatest in really tight areas but is a better choice than a longer rod.

A begginner should be less focused on equipment and more on technique which is why I suggested a basic all around inexpensive setup. Buy the rod, reel, and line at Bass Pro and then go to the fly shop closest to the area you are going to fish and buy flies and tippets and strike up a conversation about whats working best in the area. If you don't have someone to teach you to cast, find a fly shop that gives lessons. Some give free lessons. It will be a far better investment than any rod you buy. If you really want to get serious then join organizations like Trout Unlimited (TU) and Federation of Fly Fishermen (FFF) and go to the meetings. You will meet lots of great people who are more than willing to teach you anything you could posibly ever want to know about fly fishing. There will be stick up the backside elitist fly fishermen there but just smile and listen while they pontificate about their fly fishing adventures. It can be amusing while at the same time very informative.

Practice on ponds and lakes with poppers. It will help with your casting, give you confidence, and be fun at the same time.


Edited by JimFromTN (03/03/09 09:16 AM)

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#1211931 - 03/03/09 09:21 AM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: JimFromTN]
Fordman
12 Point


Registered: 08/06/00
Posts: 5864
Loc: Rockvale,tn

Offline
 Originally Posted By: JimFromTN
 Originally Posted By: captain hook
 Originally Posted By: JimFromTN
I'm no expert and to tell you the truth, you probably should not listen to an expert, especially one in a fly shop. Fly shops are good because they do often give casting lessons and they carry things that you can't get anywhere else like tippets, flies, and the goop you put on your dry flies to keep them afloat. I think that casting lessons would be a better investment than the $600 rod they are going to tell you that you absolutely need not to mention the $300 reel and the hundreds of dollars worth of fly line, tippets, and various other things. I have been fly fishing since I was about 9 yrs old and I am now in my early forties. I fished over 20 years with an 8 ft 5 wt fiberglas flyrod my father made me. I fished the Galitin river in Montana with it when I was 18. It worked just fine. You can go out and get a nice graphite flyrod in the $60 to $100 range that will work just fine for a beginner. You will end up spending almost as much for the reel if not more. Yes, you will eventually want to buy another rod. Thats part of getting into fishing regardless of the method you use. There is no fly rod that is great for everything just like there is no spinning rod that will suit all your needs.

For a starter rod, I would get an 8' rod in the 5 to 6 wt range. You could go shorter and lighter if you want. Get a reel with 2 spools. One for floating line and one for sinking line. Get a good variety of tippets.

If you have access to a boat, one of the best ways to learn to cast a fly is to go out to an open lake when the may flys are hatching and throw some poppers for blue gill.






Having been around those guys that work in Shops in Nashville as well as here in Knoxville I can say with 100% certainty there isn't a bigger load of BS in the world then what is above. Period.

You are making suggestions of rod lengths without considering a tenth of where he is wishing to fish, what he intends to use, or how he intends to use it.


I don't mean to bash all fly shops and I am sorry that I offended anyone. I was in Cumberland Transit last year and when the guy found out I wasn't some stick up the backside fly fishing elitist, he wanted nothing to do with me. I was actually looking around for a good may fly immitation to use on lakes. I wanted something a better than a traditional popper. My father used to make me some good ones but he pasted away a few years back so I needed to find a new source. The guy had no interest in helping me. Apparently, he was too stuck up to help someone who wanted to fish for panfish. I've fly fished for salmon in AK, trout in Montana, redfish in Florida (hopefully someday Tarpon), and yes bluegill on KY Lake. I walked around there and looked at the flyrods. Do they carry anything under $250 to $300? There is (or was. Its been a few years) a fly shop in Brentwood that did not carry anything less expensive but they were very nice people and very helpful so I would say the guy at Cumberland Transit was the exception and not the rule. My main point is that fly shops are usually more expensive and not what I would recomend for someone who is trying to break in to the world of fly fishing. Once that person has the experience and the technique down and wants to move up then by all means go and buy your equipment at a fly shop.

An 8 foot 5 wt rod is a good all around rod for TN and the guy is a beginner. 5 wt is light enough for panfish and trout and heavy enough for a descent size smallie. Some people are pushing for a 9 foot rod. Have you ever tried to fish some of the streams in the Smokies with a 9 ft rod? Your line will spend more time in the trees then in the water. An 8ft rod is good enough for long casts in open areas and maybe not the greatest in really tight areas but is a better choice than a longer rod.

A begginner should be less focused on equipment and more on technique which is why I suggested a basic all around inexpensive setup. Buy the rod, reel, and line at Bass Pro and then go to the fly shop closest to the area you are going to fish and buy flies and tippets and strike up a conversation about whats working best in the area. If you don't have someone to teach you to cast, find a fly shop that gives lessons. Some give free lessons. It will be a far better investment than any rod you buy. If you really want to get serious then join organizations like Trout Unlimited (TU) and Federation of Fly Fishermen (FFF) and go to the meetings. You will meet lots of great people who are more than willing to teach you anything you could posibly ever want to know about fly fishing.


Well let me tell you. There are bad apples in every barrel. I dont shop at CT but I can say that they are not like you portray them, atleast not now. Grumpy is a nice man and would bend over backwards to help anyone. Fly South is my shop of choice and yes they carry rods the run the gammut of prices. Most small shops carry what the big boxes dont and thats usually a large selection of better equipment, thats how they survive. BPS and Cabelas, for the most part, have little interest in keeping a novice in the sport. Its not that they are bad or evil, its that they dont have the literally years of knowledge that a independant shop has to have in order to survive. Are they bad for the consumer, the big boxes, well no but they are very toxic to the pro shops that are still out there.
I have always tried to steer folks to the independant shops be they archery or fly fishing. I fully understand that in these tough economic times people are price shopping everything but let us not forget that those little shops need customers to survive as well.

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#1212016 - 03/03/09 09:41 AM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Fordman]
B.D.
8 Point


Registered: 03/24/08
Posts: 1484
Loc: Hendersonville TN

Offline
Also, keep in mind that a local fly shop won't stay in business if all they sell is tippet and the occasional casting lesson.

If we all bought our rods at Bass Pro and then went to the fly shops for advice, it won't be long before the local shops are dead and Bass Pro is the only place left. The guys at Bass Pro are nice enough, but they don't have much expertise and can't give you good advice about matching a line to a rod, what gear is best for what conditions, etc. Bass Pro doesn't do casting lessons. They often won't even let you take a rod out and cast it before you buy, which is critical with fly gear.

Also, don't think for a second that Bass Pro will continue to keep their prices cheap after they've killed off all their competition.

By the way, I have indeed fished the Smokies with a 9 foot rod. It actually works better than you'd expect. The reason is because 90 percent of the time up there, you have to roll cast or "dap" the fly into tight places. That's actually easier to do with a long rod. In the few places where you can actually back cast, there's not much difference between an 8ft and a 9ft rod.

bd

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#1212068 - 03/03/09 09:47 AM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: JimFromTN]
Radar
Non-Typical


Registered: 08/19/01
Posts: 31209
Loc: Kansas City, Mo.

Offline
 Originally Posted By: JimFromTN
 Originally Posted By: captain hook
 Originally Posted By: JimFromTN
I'm no expert and to tell you the truth, you probably should not listen to an expert, especially one in a fly shop. Fly shops are good because they do often give casting lessons and they carry things that you can't get anywhere else like tippets, flies, and the goop you put on your dry flies to keep them afloat. I think that casting lessons would be a better investment than the $600 rod they are going to tell you that you absolutely need not to mention the $300 reel and the hundreds of dollars worth of fly line, tippets, and various other things. I have been fly fishing since I was about 9 yrs old and I am now in my early forties. I fished over 20 years with an 8 ft 5 wt fiberglas flyrod my father made me. I fished the Galitin river in Montana with it when I was 18. It worked just fine. You can go out and get a nice graphite flyrod in the $60 to $100 range that will work just fine for a beginner. You will end up spending almost as much for the reel if not more. Yes, you will eventually want to buy another rod. Thats part of getting into fishing regardless of the method you use. There is no fly rod that is great for everything just like there is no spinning rod that will suit all your needs.

For a starter rod, I would get an 8' rod in the 5 to 6 wt range. You could go shorter and lighter if you want. Get a reel with 2 spools. One for floating line and one for sinking line. Get a good variety of tippets.

If you have access to a boat, one of the best ways to learn to cast a fly is to go out to an open lake when the may flys are hatching and throw some poppers for blue gill.






Having been around those guys that work in Shops in Nashville as well as here in Knoxville I can say with 100% certainty there isn't a bigger load of BS in the world then what is above. Period.

You are making suggestions of rod lengths without considering a tenth of where he is wishing to fish, what he intends to use, or how he intends to use it.


I don't mean to bash all fly shops and I am sorry that I offended anyone. I was in Cumberland Transit last year and when the guy found out I wasn't some stick up the backside fly fishing elitist, he wanted nothing to do with me. I was actually looking around for a good may fly immitation to use on lakes. I wanted something a better than a traditional popper. My father used to make me some good ones but he pasted away a few years back so I needed to find a new source. The guy had no interest in helping me. Apparently, he was too stuck up to help someone who wanted to fish for panfish. I've fly fished for salmon in AK, trout in Montana, redfish in Florida (hopefully someday Tarpon), and yes bluegill on KY Lake. I walked around there and looked at the flyrods. Do they carry anything under $250 to $300? There is (or was. Its been a few years) a fly shop in Brentwood that did not carry anything less expensive but they were very nice people and very helpful so I would say the guy at Cumberland Transit was the exception and not the rule. My main point is that fly shops are usually more expensive and not what I would recomend for someone who is trying to break in to the world of fly fishing. Once that person has the experience and the technique down and wants to move up then by all means go and buy your equipment at a fly shop.

An 8 foot 5 wt rod is a good all around rod for TN and the guy is a beginner. 5 wt is light enough for panfish and trout and heavy enough for a descent size smallie. Some people are pushing for a 9 foot rod. Have you ever tried to fish some of the streams in the Smokies with a 9 ft rod? Your line will spend more time in the trees then in the water. An 8ft rod is good enough for long casts in open areas and maybe not the greatest in really tight areas but is a better choice than a longer rod.

A begginner should be less focused on equipment and more on technique which is why I suggested a basic all around inexpensive setup. Buy the rod, reel, and line at Bass Pro and then go to the fly shop closest to the area you are going to fish and buy flies and tippets and strike up a conversation about whats working best in the area. If you don't have someone to teach you to cast, find a fly shop that gives lessons. Some give free lessons. It will be a far better investment than any rod you buy. If you really want to get serious then join organizations like Trout Unlimited (TU) and Federation of Fly Fishermen (FFF) and go to the meetings. You will meet lots of great people who are more than willing to teach you anything you could posibly ever want to know about fly fishing. There will be stick up the backside elitist fly fishermen there but just smile and listen while they pontificate about their fly fishing adventures. It can be amusing while at the same time very informative.

Practice on ponds and lakes with poppers. It will help with your casting, give you confidence, and be fun at the same time.


Jim , I think you hit the nail on the head with that post . I agree 100%
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#1212143 - 03/03/09 10:02 AM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Radar]
madMax
4 Point


Registered: 04/09/08
Posts: 130
Loc: Middle TN

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Also agree with Jim's post. Thats all we are trying to say is that getting into the sport the "intro" should not consist of talk about mid to high dollar equipment and brands. It should consist of talk on technique, presentation, where are good places to learn etc. Unless newbies just have the money to throw down - then by all means go buy whatever you think is best. If you want to try out flyfishing and arent sure if its your thing - buy cheap, test the waters, then go from there. You can always buy better, but if you buy better and you dont enjoy it your stuck with it. I also agree the best way to learn basics is buy a cheap flyrod, go to the lake this spring and summer and a catch bass/bluegill on poppers. This is by far the best way to learn but just my opinion.
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#1212207 - 03/03/09 10:40 AM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: B.D.]
JimFromTN
8 Point


Registered: 07/14/08
Posts: 1419
Loc: Nashville, TN

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 Originally Posted By: Brian Dunigan

By the way, I have indeed fished the Smokies with a 9 foot rod. It actually works better than you'd expect. The reason is because 90 percent of the time up there, you have to roll cast or "dap" the fly into tight places. That's actually easier to do with a long rod. In the few places where you can actually back cast, there's not much difference between an 8ft and a 9ft rod.


I just came across this. Its the rule that I had learned.

http://www.flyfishinggear.info/buyers_guide/fly_rods_length.shtm

I don't want to put the fly shops out of business. I think beginners should buy cheap and once they get into it, go to the fly shop and buy the $400 orvis rod.


Edited by JimFromTN (03/03/09 10:43 AM)

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#1212275 - 03/03/09 11:18 AM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Fordman]
gil1
12 Point


Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 6339
Loc: Nashville, TN

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Just a thought...

Have y'all been to a fly shop lately? They wouldn't last long without offering introductory equipment. In fact, I'd say that teaching and equipping the beginners is their bread and butter. I can't compare prices because I haven't looked elsewhere in a while, but our local shops all have very affordable introductory packages.

On Cumberland Transit, I'm wondering who you saw over there. The head fly guy over there is the antithesis of the elitist fly boy you described. He's just a regular no-frills guy that loves to chat and help others. I say give them another shot if you can. At least don't measure all fly shops by that one experience because I've never had a problem in any of the shops I've been to.
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#1212737 - 03/03/09 01:22 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: ]
Radar
Non-Typical


Registered: 08/19/01
Posts: 31209
Loc: Kansas City, Mo.

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I wish there were some fly shops in my area . I would be a customer for sure . ;\) I try to support the local shops whenever possible. I think Fordman can vouch for me on that . We had a long discussion today about this thread when he came over to the house . I learned allot from our conversation . There are allot of things that are taken the wrong way on these threads , and when you talk to someone in person , it is easier to understand the different views. ;\) Troy and I have known each other for about 8 years now , so he knows where I'm coming from. We can also debate without it becoming personal.
I also got to put my hands on some of his nice fly rods.
As far as supporting the small shops goes , when I go bass or crappie fishing , I try to seek out those small mom and pop baitshops near the lakes and rivers to buy bait and lures that I can't find anywhere else.
It is also a great place to get general info on what the fishing are hitting.
I appreciate the help I have gotten from Fordman , Gil , and Jakeaway regarding fly fishing tackle. Thats what makes these forums so great.

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#1212786 - 03/03/09 01:41 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: JimFromTN]
B.D.
8 Point


Registered: 03/24/08
Posts: 1484
Loc: Hendersonville TN

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 Originally Posted By: JimFromTN

I don't want to put the fly shops out of business. I think beginners should buy cheap and once they get into it, go to the fly shop and buy the $400 orvis rod.


I agree with this. Most of my rods now are from G. Loomis, but I'd never recommend that someone buy a $650 rod for their very first flyrod.

That said, "cheap" is a relative term. Unfortunately, most of the decent-quality entry level flyrods are between $100 and $150. I think TFO really stands out in this category. Bass Pro and Cabela's offer some cheaper combos (I think Bass Pro's Dogwood Canyon combo is about $75 for rod, reel, line, and all). However, the quality is just not there. In my opinion, those rods will make you regret not buying something nicer if you stick with it very long.

bd

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#1213514 - 03/03/09 06:23 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: B.D.]
jakeway
TnDeer Old Timer
10 Point


Registered: 11/22/99
Posts: 3577
Loc: Hendersonville, TN, USA

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 Originally Posted By: Brian Dunigan
[quote=JimFromTN]
...That said, "cheap" is a relative term...
bd


EXACTLY! One guy on another site was praising "Low cost" reels, then finally defined "Low Price" as $200, "High Price" as over $600. To many people, anything over $50 is expensive.

For rods, I like to use Bass Pro as the examples, since practically anyone can go to a shop or view their catalogs. I'd say that for a beginner, the BPS "Dogwood Canyon" is the lowest quality I'd recommend, and I think the Hobbs Creek would be better for a beginner. In either case, get a line at least as good as a Mainstream ($35). If you buy a cheap rod at Wal*Mart and put a low end line (Level line should be outlawed, but that's what I learned on) on it, you could get very frustrated at how hard it is to get consistant, good casts.

You will enjoy the sport exponentially more if you get lightweight quality equipment.

If anyone out there reading this wants to try fly fishing, but can't afford more than $50 on a rod, send me a PM and I'll see if I have something in my "seldom used" rodbox that will work for you.
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#1214940 - 03/04/09 09:31 AM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: jakeway]
Radar
Non-Typical


Registered: 08/19/01
Posts: 31209
Loc: Kansas City, Mo.

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I'm sitting here waiting for the UPS man to arrive with my new flyrod . I should be out in the yard in the next couple of hours flailing away with it . \:\)
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#1215351 - 03/04/09 12:35 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: jakeway]
B.D.
8 Point


Registered: 03/24/08
Posts: 1484
Loc: Hendersonville TN

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 Originally Posted By: jakeway

You will enjoy the sport exponentially more if you get lightweight quality equipment.


Amen, especially on the "quality" part. You don't have to buy a $700 rod by any stretch of the imagination, but there's a world of difference in performance between a $50 rod and a $150 one. Same goes for conventional tackle, really.

bd

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#1215747 - 03/04/09 04:36 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: B.D.]
Radar
Non-Typical


Registered: 08/19/01
Posts: 31209
Loc: Kansas City, Mo.

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I'm very happy with the Cabelas rod I received today. I spent some time in the yard practicing with it .
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#1223966 - 03/08/09 02:25 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: JimFromTN]
TNFishnstix
Button


Registered: 03/05/09
Posts: 10
Loc: Nashville

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[quote=JimFromTN

I don't mean to bash all fly shops and I am sorry that I offended anyone. I was in Cumberland Transit last year and when the guy found out I wasn't some stick up the backside fly fishing elitist, he wanted nothing to do with me. I was actually looking around for a good may fly immitation to use on lakes. I wanted something a better than a traditional popper. My father used to make me some good ones but he pasted away a few years back so I needed to find a new source. The guy had no interest in helping me. Apparently, he was too stuck up to help someone who wanted to fish for panfish. I've fly fished for salmon in AK, trout in Montana, redfish in Florida (hopefully someday Tarpon), and yes bluegill on KY Lake. I walked around there and looked at the flyrods. Do they carry anything under $250 to $300? [/quote]

JimfromTN, Number one, if you experienced anything like what you have mentioned at Cumberland Transit, I can assure you that it was not intentional and had nothing to do with what you fish for, what you fish with, or anything of that nature. And the apologies of the entire staff is extended. We pride ourselves in providing excellent customer service, and if you had in fact spent any time in the store you would see and understand that. As far as high priced rods, yes we have a few, but once again, if you took a good look around, and you did state that you looked at the rods, you would have seen a much wider selection in the TFO's, in the Cortlands, and the lower end rods than you did in the Orvis, or the Winstons or the bamboo that is displayed. We specialize in starter set ups and we advocate starting with what can be afforded rather than selling the high end rods. We also advocate going out and casting the rods with the customer so they can see, feel and experience the differences in fly rods prior to selection. Every customer gets asked tons of questions to help determine the appropriate rod/reel prior to selling them anything. Too, you will NEVER see anyone in the fly shop start at the top and sell down to the lower end. We do have customers come in looking for the higher end rods but that rarely happens with a beginner and even if it did, I would do my best to understand why they wanted to do that to begin with. I can assure you that Grumpy feels exactly the same way. Once again, our apologies are fully extended to you for any bad experience you may have had in our store, and we invite you back in for a "second look". Come in have a cup of coffee, and get to know us.

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#1224522 - 03/08/09 08:26 PM Re: Intro to fly fishing [Re: Radar]
Fence Post
TnDeer Old Timer
10 Point


Registered: 11/19/99
Posts: 3011
Loc: Bluff City,Tn. USA

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 Originally Posted By: Scott61
I'm sitting here waiting for the UPS man to arrive with my new flyrod . I should be out in the yard in the next couple of hours flailing away with it . \:\)


Scott, wish we had touched on the flyfish subject at the 'vous before you ordered. I have slightly used Orvis gear littering up the garage....
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