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The Steel Buffalo system.

Lets grow some stuff.

The Steel Buffalo system.

Postby TN Whitetail Freak » Wed Jun 12, 2019 12:09 pm

What are the opinions on this method. Personally ive never planted a food plot but if i ever did get lucky enough to have ground to manage i think id probably go with Dr. Woods method.
Last edited by TN Whitetail Freak on Thu Jun 13, 2019 10:46 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Dr. Woods Steel Buffalo system.

Postby MickThompson » Wed Jun 12, 2019 2:16 pm

I think he's taking an awful lot of credit for concepts he markets but didn't develop. It's basic USDA "soil health" farming with a cooler name. It draws on a lot of principles of agriculture that we forgot when fertilizer started coming in a bag. You can scale it up to full blown production ag or down to a backyard vegetable garden, but the principles are the same-

Never leave the ground bare
Always have a living root in the soil
Minimize disturbance
Maximize crop/cover diversity
https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nr ... ls/health/

You work to enhance natural systems instead of trying to conquer them with steel. Most of us don't have an unlimited supply of topsoil to play with, So you better make the best of what you have.

It works. It's how I grow my backyard vegetable garden, and there are 100,000s of acres of cropland managed in TN this way right now.
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Re: Dr. Woods Steel Buffalo system.

Postby BULL MOOSE » Wed Jun 12, 2019 8:32 pm

I think it is awesome. No till drill and crimper
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Re: Dr. Woods Steel Buffalo system.

Postby Andy S. » Thu Jun 13, 2019 7:01 am

^^^ MT nailed it.
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Re: Dr. Woods Steel Buffalo system.

Postby MickThompson » Thu Jun 13, 2019 9:31 am

The real key to a system like this is figuring out how to terminate your crop. A roller crimper works well for some crops at certain stages in their growth, but not all. It's a n expensive piece of equipment that does 1 thing. I can no till with an atv, sprayer, spreader, and mower or weed eater- no specialized equipment necessary. I could ditch the atv on micro plots, but i wouldn't want to. I don''t advocate pickling the world in roundup, but once you eliminate a perennial cover, you can maintain annual food plot rotations with minimal herbicide use.

a big tractor, no till planter,and roller crimper would be nice, but they aren't mandatory. You need a way to kill the existing plants, a way to spread seed, and a way to lay the thatch down.

I used to till my garden and that's how I initially killed most of the turf grasses. When I expanded later I just sprayed it. I use a little red bag seeder for my winter cover and plant my summer crops by poking a slit with a machete or simply placing the seed under the thatch. I let the covers flower for a couple weeks before I try to kill them- usually late April or early May. My covers were thigh high and thick enough that I had a family of rabbits in there. Any sooner and they will resprout with a fury. I terminate by scalping with a weedeater and push mow between the rows through the summer.

BTW, the guys that are rolling down covers in production ag are usually spraying it at the same time to make sure they get a good kill.

You can probably adapt what you are doing now and tools you already have for soil health food plots.
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Re: The Steel Buffalo system.

Postby Chaneylake » Fri Jun 14, 2019 9:57 pm

20190614_160827.jpg
20190614_160827.jpg (120.73 KiB) Viewed 1026 times


No till today, killed existing vegetation and planted corn in our duck hole. All in one pass.
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Re: The Steel Buffalo system.

Postby JCDEERMAN » Mon Jun 17, 2019 7:19 pm

I am all on board with this system. My whole life has been plowing, discing, spraying, 2 weeks later - discing, planting, cultipacking. Hours on end. Now that I have a little girl and our hunting camp folks are getting older and the younger guys are getting married and soon having kids, we need to find a way to work smarter and save time.

For those of you that have much more knowledge than myself on no till drills and this buffalo method, please educate me on this.

If we get a true no till drill, could one just spray to kill, then 2 weeks later use our 10ft cultipacker to lay over the grasses to flatten them and then no till drill right on top (driving in the same direction the grasses are laid)?

What brand no till drills would you recommend?
What brand would you stay away from?

It is hard to find a TRUE no till drill

Thanks in advance guys!
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Re: The Steel Buffalo system.

Postby DavidW » Mon Jun 17, 2019 8:44 pm

You can view some good videos on the concept https://www.growingdeer.tv/#/scouting-h ... ade-better.
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Re: The Steel Buffalo system.

Postby MickThompson » Mon Jun 17, 2019 9:24 pm

I've seen them set up with a 3 pt sprayer with booms mounted on the back of the drill, spraying and planting in a single pass but I wouldn't do that since it really limits what you can do with your sprayer. Unless you are trying to plant into stuff more than 2' tall I wouldn't bother with knocking it down after spraying. If I was planting into the tall stuff, bush hogging would be my choice after killing the field over cutipacking. Unless you have a super heavy thatch, it won't matter which way you orient yourself with the "grain". The drill has a pair of straight disk blades that meet to cut the seed furrow so if you put enough down pressure, you'll slice right through.

What are you wanting to plant? I've been around the forage drills much more than the grain drills. They both do different things better than the other. Forage/grass drills seed by "controlled spillage" vs metering out a seed every 7" for example. It won't do grain crops nearly as well as a grain drill but a grain drill with 30" rows is pretty worthless for planting winter wheat and clover. They can both plant warm season legumes though.

When you start looking at drills, keep the towing width vs the width of your gates in mind. Many have the wheels outboard to the frame and a drill that plants 8' wide may not go through a 10' gate. Haybuster, Truax, and Great Plains/Land Pride are the 3 we see around here. That's my order of preference too, mainly due to how you adjust output. I prefer not swapping sprockets like with the Great Plains. They all are good machines but do different things better and have their drawbacks as well.
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Re: The Steel Buffalo system.

Postby JCDEERMAN » Tue Jun 18, 2019 9:35 am

Mick - thanks for your input! We plant a mixture of everything - clover varieties, cereal grain varieties (oats wheat cereal rye), brassica varieties, sometimes corn and soybeans. here are the drills we are trying to decide on:

Frontier CS1384
Great Plains 3P606NT
Genesis 5

Any positives or negatives with these?

For the Frontier, the roller spikes somewhat concern me (it's not a disc that makes a slit in the soil) and I dont see exactly how it plants per reading material I've found, YouTube, etc....though it is the best price out of the 3 i have found so far.
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Re: The Steel Buffalo system.

Postby MickThompson » Tue Jun 18, 2019 8:30 pm

I haven't used any of them or any 3 pt hitch drill for that matter. You can pretty well plant everything you listed with a no till planter but you won't get big ears on a 7" row spacing.

The cultipacker worries me more than the spikes on the Frontier. Looks like it would ride up on every high spot instead of pressing the furrow shut like independent press wheels would. I think it's designed more for planting a worked up seed bed.

Edit- have you looked at the Truax 3 pt hitch model?
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Re: The Steel Buffalo system.

Postby JCDEERMAN » Wed Jun 19, 2019 10:17 am

Mick - The cultipacker worries me, as well. I agree on it seems to be designed more for a prepared seed bed.

Just took a look at the Truax drills. Which one specifically - either one of the FLXII-88G (5.3ft) or the FLXII-812G (8ft), or is there another specific one you had in mind? Thoughts on this brand and drill(s)?
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Re: The Steel Buffalo system.

Postby MickThompson » Wed Jun 19, 2019 9:39 pm

Pretty tough, lighter than some of the others, good customer support. I've used a Flex II 88 a good bit. you can find them used when soil conservation districts get new machines if you keep an eye out.
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Re: The Steel Buffalo system.

Postby JCDEERMAN » Fri Jun 21, 2019 8:49 am

We just ordered the Great Plains 3P606NT. One large seed box and one small seed box. Sure hope this thing does what it should.
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Re: The Steel Buffalo system.

Postby foodplot » Wed Jul 10, 2019 7:54 pm

I don't think Mr woods is worried about taking credit for anything...... what he has done is bring this idea to food plotters.... how many of you currently look at Agriculture sites etc?. not me i'm a hunter and look at hunting blogs and information...... DR woods has brought this idea into the hunting world....i am currently experimenting with this idea and i can tell you everything he says is TRUE!
THANK YOU MR WOODS!
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Re: The Steel Buffalo system.

Postby BULL MOOSE » Wed Jul 10, 2019 9:26 pm

I love watching how he has transformed his property. I believe at one time, he said that all the ridgetops in that Missouri county were covered in tomato fields and after 3-4 years of growing tomatoes, tne6 would abandon the fields or something like that...now the hills are covered in trees.
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Re: The Steel Buffalo system.

Postby JCDEERMAN » Thu Jul 11, 2019 8:39 am

foodplot wrote:I don't think Mr woods is worried about taking credit for anything...... what he has done is bring this idea to food plotters.... how many of you currently look at Agriculture sites etc?. not me i'm a hunter and look at hunting blogs and information...... DR woods has brought this idea into the hunting world....i am currently experimenting with this idea and i can tell you everything he says is TRUE!
THANK YOU MR WOODS!


I completely agree. You can tell when people are truly genuine, and he is certainly one of them. I have totally bought into the Buffalo system and am addicted to growing deer tv. He has done some amazing stuff on his place in the ozark mountains...something we will be trying to replicate starting this fall and moving forward
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