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   Aging Deer

 

  • Fawn ~ A fawn's jaws are very small and contain only four teeth.

  • Yearling (1-1/2 years) ~ Yearlings are the easiest to recognize. The first three jaw teeth are milk teeth. These will be worn smooth, while the remaining teeth (numbers 4, 5, and 6) will be sharp. Tooth number 3 will have three cusps (points) if it is a milk tooth. It will be replaced when the deer is 2 years old with a two-cusp adult tooth.

  • 2-1/2 years ~ The first three milk teeth have been replaced by adult teeth. The number 3 tooth has two cusps. All teeth are sharp. On the tongue side (the higher side of the tooth), the dentine of the number 4 tooth is not as wide as the enamel which surrounds it.

  • 3-1/2 years ~ The dentine of tooth number 4 is wider than the enamel, but this is not true of tooth number 5.

  • 4-1/2 years ~ The dentine of tooth number 5 is wider than the enamel, but this is not true of tooth number 6.

  • 5-1/2 years ~ The dentine of all three back teeth (4, 5, and 6) is wider than the enamel.

  • 6-1/2 years ~ Tooth number 4 is worn smooth, but teeth 5 and 6 are not.

  • 7-1/2 years ~ Teeth 4 and 5 are worn smooth, but 5 may have a slight ridge remaining.

  • 8-1/2 years ~ All three back teeth (4, 5, and 6) are worn smooth, but 6 may have a slight ridge remaining.

  • Over 8-1/2 years ~ It is generally impossible to determine the age of a deer older than 8-1/2 years from the jawbone, because all of the characteristic formations have been worn smooth.

 

 
 
 

 


 
     
 

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